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Can You Take Metformin And Magnesium Together

Should Metformin Come With A B12 “prescription”?

Should Metformin Come With A B12 “prescription”?

Metformin is widely considered to be a first-line treatment for type 2 diabetes, and it has been prescribed to over 120 million people worldwide. It’s a safe bet that a large proportion of those people are deficient in vitamin B12, thanks to the use of this medication. While the percentages vary, studies consistently show that metformin impairs vitamin B12 absorption. In one multicenter randomized trial, metformin was associated with a 19% decrease in vitamin B12 concentration compared to placebo (de Jager J, et al. BMJ (Clinical Research Ed.) 2010; 340, c2181). In a cross-sectional cohort study, patients on long-term metformin therapy had 26.7% lower cobalamin levels, 21.6% lower holotranscobalamin and 9.7% higher homocysteine compared with people in the control group (Hermann L, et al. The British Journal of Diabetes & Vascular Disease. 2004; 4(6), 401–406). Commonly cited figures are that 10-30% of people with diabetes who take metformin will have decreased vitamin B12. This is most likely an underestimation. Given its impact on vitamin B12 absorption, it might make sense for doctors to consider pairing B12 supplements with their metformin prescriptions. Signs of Deficiency Vitamin B12 is the largest and most complex of the vitamins. It is the only one that contains a metal ion—cobalt--and the only one that requires a transporter in the small intestine. It is required for proper red blood cell formation, neurological function, and DNA synthesis. It is also a co-factor for methionine synthase and L-methylmalonyl-CoA mutase. The former is needed for the formation of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe), a universal methyl donor for almost 100 different substrates. Symptoms of B12 deficiency include: megaloblastic anemia, fatigue, weakness, constipation, loss of appetite, Continue reading >>

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

The most common medication used in women with PCOS is the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Research is strongly showing that long-term use of metformin and at high doses (1.5mg or higher daily) can deplete levels of vitamin B12. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause permanent neurological and nerve damage as well as mood changes and decreased energy. Here’s what you need to know to avoid a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take metformin. About Metformin Metformin is a medication that became available in the U.S. in 1995 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the most widely used medication used to lower insulin levels in those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Other names for metformin include glucophage, glucophage XR, glumetza, and fortamet. Metformin lowers blood glucose levels in three ways: It suppresses the liver’s production of glucose. It increases the sensitivity of your liver, muscle, fat, and cells to the insulin your body makes. It slows the absorption of carbohydrates you consume Metformin use may affect the absorption of vitamin B12 possibly through alterations in intestinal mobility, increased bacterial overgrowth, or alterations of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex. Metformin can cause a malabsorption in B12 due to digestive changes, which leads to the binding of B12-intrinsic factor complex (intrinsic factor is needed to absorb B12 in the gut) and a reduction of B12 absorption. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Metformin Users The largest study thus far to examine the link between metformin and vitamin B12 is the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DDPOS). This study looked at B12 levels of individuals with prediabetes who took 850 mg Metformin 2x/day and compared them to those taking a placebo. At 5 years, 4.3% of the metformin users had Continue reading >>

Metformin And Magnesium Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin And Magnesium Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin and Magnesium drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Metformin and Magnesium together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Metformin and Magnesium. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 2,278 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2,278 people who take Metformin, Magnesium are studied. Most common drug interactions over time *: Neuropathy peripheral (surface nerve damage) Sepsis (a severe blood infection that can lead to organ failure and death) Acute coronary syndrome (acute chest pain and other symptoms that happen because the heart does not get blood) Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe) Blister (small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure) Cerebral infarction (less blood supply to brain resulting tissue damage) Cholecystitis chronic (long lasting infection of gallbladder) Carpal tunnel syndrome (nerve compression at wrist results numbness weakness, pain , swelling) Acute myocardial infarction (acute heart attack) Aortic arteriosclerosis (hardening of the aortic arteries) Atrial fibrillation (fibrillation of the muscles of the atria of the heart) Cardiomegaly (increased size of heart than normal) Cholelithiasis (the presence or formation of gallstones in the gallbladder or bile ducts) Thrombocytopenia (decrease of platelets in blood) A Continue reading >>

Magnesium Citrate And Metformin Interaction | Treato

Magnesium Citrate And Metformin Interaction | Treato

Metformin and PCOS Magnesium Citrate and Magnesium Metformin and Diabetes Magnesium Citrate and Constipation Metformin and Clomid Magnesium Citrate and Pain Metformin and Weight Loss Magnesium Citrate and Calcium Metformin and Pregnancy Magnesium Citrate and Laxative Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Magnesium And Diabetes: Reduce Blood Sugar Now!

Magnesium And Diabetes: Reduce Blood Sugar Now!

Magnesium is the second most abundant mineral in our body. Considering we have so much, it’s obviously needed for a ton of stuff. It’s a vital nutrient that drives close to 300 different biochemical reactions in the body. One of these critical functions is ensuring that our blood sugar remains within the right range. The connection between having adequate magnesium and diabetes prevention is deep. Magnesium can help prevent diabetes if you don’t have it yet. If you are diabetic, it can help you control blood sugar better. We’re meant to get magnesium from a variety of foods, including dairy. And yet an astounding 80% of Americans are deficient in this mineral. Is it any wonder then that heart diseases, hypertension, and diabetes are on such a sharp rise in the United States? The relationship between magnesium and diabetes mellitus is crucial. Here’s why: Magnesium helps muscle cells relax, so insulin resistance goes down. Cells allow more sugar in. Blood sugar goes down. The heart is a muscle. Magnesium helps the heart relax and lowers risk of cardiac issues in diabetics. When magnesium is sufficient, it prevents calcium deposition in the inner walls of blood vessels. This helps prevent hardening of arteries. Magnesium is important for the production of energy. Diabetics often feel tired because proper energy production is an issue. Magnesium helps convert excess of glucose in the blood into glycogen. This gets stored in the liver. Excess sugar is removed from the blood. Magnesium helps antioxidants like Glutathione do their job in our body. Antioxidants help slow down aging. Diabetics face more oxidative stress than non-diabetics. This causes diabetic complications across the whole body. Diabetics often complain of feeling pins and needles or numbness in thei Continue reading >>

Medications And Supplements That Should Not Be Taken Together

Medications And Supplements That Should Not Be Taken Together

It’s not often that I get a call from one of our expert doctors urging me to cover a topic because of a strong concern about public safety—but it happened recently and so here we go: Are you aware of how dangerous it can be to combine certain supplements with medications? The call came from Leo Galland, MD, an internist and founder of Pill Advised (an online resource for information about medications and supplements. Having extensively reviewed the research into interactions between drugs and supplements, Dr. Galland told me that he is becoming increasingly worried about this particular problem. “People need to take these interactions seriously and be aware that negative outcomes can occur,” he warns. “The results can be catastrophic.” About 40% of Americans now take dietary supplements in the form of a vitamin, mineral, herb or other substance—and those 50 and older are more likely than younger folks to use supplements and, as a group, to take more medications. Dr. Galland emphasized that “the sicker and more fragile you are, the greater the impact of an interaction,” but added that in truth, anyone combining drugs and supplements is at risk for interactions—and the more drugs and supplements that you take, the greater the danger. When interactions cause harm Dr. Galland explained that there are certain common pathways for negative interactions. Specifically, interactions often occur because the supplement interferes with the way the drug is absorbed into the bloodstream, metabolized by the liver or excreted by the kidneys—in this way, the remedy you turn to for help with one problem may bring about others that are far worse. Sometimes drugs and supplements have a similar action in the body, so that taking both magnifies the effect of the drug—w Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Magnesium: The Emerging Role Of Oral Magnesium Supplementation

Diabetes And Magnesium: The Emerging Role Of Oral Magnesium Supplementation

The Magnesium Report Article By Yiqing Song, MD, ScD - Published in Diabetologia Elevated serum magnesium associated with SGLT2 inhibitor use in type 2 diabetes patients: a meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials Clinical, Research, and Laboratory News for Cardiologists Third Quarter 2000 The link between diabetes mellitus and magnesium deficiency is well known. A growing body of evidence suggests that magnesium plays a pivotal role in reducing cardiovascular risks and may be involved in the pathogenesis of diabetes itself. While the benefits of oral magnesium supplementation on glycemic control have yet to be demonstrated in patients, magnesium supplementation has been shown to improve insulin sensitivity. Based on current knowledge, clinicians have good reason to believe that magnesium repletion may play a role in delaying type 2 diabetes onset and potentially in warding off its devastating complications -- cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, and nephropathy. Magnesium needs in the American population The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) for magnesium is 6 mg/kg/d. This means 400 mg/d to 420 mg/d for adult men and 320 mg/d for adult women (and even more for women who are pregnant or lactating). By these standards, which have been promulgated by the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine after great deliberation, research, and literature review, an estimated 50% to 85% of the population of the United States is receiving an inadequate magnesium intake. Levels of magnesium may be particularly low in certain populations, such as African Americans. For example, the prevalence of hypomagnesemia is 20% among urban African Americans in the city of Buffalo, NY, and surrounding area. This exceeds the prevalence of hypomagnesemia in the general popula Continue reading >>

Magnesium: Uses, Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions & Warning

Magnesium: Uses, Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions & Warning

Aspartate de Magnsium, Atomic Number 12, Carbonate de Magnsium, Chelated Magnesium, Chlorure de Magnsium, Citrate de Magnsium, Dimagnesium Malate, Epsom Salts, Gluconate de Magnsium, Glycrophosphate de Magnsium, Glycinate de Magnsium, Hydroxyde de Magnsium, Lactate de Magnsium, Lait de Magnsium, Magnesia, Magnesia Carbonica, Magnesia Muriatica, Magnesia Phosphorica, Magnesia Sulfate, Magnesia Sulfurica, Magnesio, Magnsium, Magnesium Ascorbate, Magnesium Aspartate, Magnesium Carbonate, Magnsium Chelat, Magnesium Chloride, Magnesium Citrate, Magnesium Disuccinate Hydrate, Magnesium Gluconate, Magnesium Glycerophosphate, Magnesium Glycinate, Magnesium Hydroxide, Magnesium Lactate, Magnesium Malate, Magnesium Murakab, Magnesium Orotate, Magnesium Oxide, Magnesium Phosphate, Magnesium Phosphoricum, Magnesium Sulfate, Magnesium Taurate, Magnesium Taurinate, Magnesium Trisilicate, Malate de Magnsium, Milk of Magnesia, Mg, Numro Atomique 12, Orotate de Magnsium, Oxyde de Magnsium, Phosphate de Magnsium, Sels d'Epsom, Sulfate de Magnsium, Trisilicate de Magnsium. Magnesium is a mineral that is important for normal bone structure in the body. People get magnesium from their diet, but sometimes magnesium supplements are needed if magnesium levels are too low. Dietary intake of magnesium may be low, particularly among women. Magnesium deficiency is also not uncommon among African Americans and the elderly. Low magnesium levels in the body have been linked to diseases such as osteoporosis, high blood pressure, clogged arteries, hereditary heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. An easy way to remember foods that are good magnesium sources is to think fiber. Foods that are high in fiber are generally high in magnesium. Dietary sources of magnesium include legumes, whole grains, vegetab Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy And Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

The Relationship Between Hypomagnesemia, Metformin Therapy And Cardiovascular Disease Complicating Type 2 Diabetes: The Fremantle Diabetes Study

Go to: Abstract Low serum magnesium concentrations have been associated with cardiovascular disease risk and outcomes in some general population studies but there are no equivalent studies in diabetes. Metformin may have cardiovascular benefits beyond blood glucose lowering in type 2 diabetes but its association with hypomagnesemia appears paradoxical. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between metformin therapy, magnesium homoeostasis and cardiovascular disease in well-characterized type 2 patients from the community. Methods and Findings We studied 940 non-insulin-treated patients (mean±SD age 63.4±11.6 years, 49.0% males) from the longitudinal observational Fremantle Diabetes Study Phase I (FDS1) who were followed for 12.3±5.3 years. Baseline serum magnesium was measured using stored sera. Multivariate methods were used to determine associates of prevalent and incident coronary heart disease (CHD) and cerebrovascular disease (CVD) as ascertained from self-report and linked morbidity/mortality databases. 19% of patients were hypomagnesemic (serum magnesium <0.70 mmol/L). Patients on metformin, alone or combined with a sulfonylurea, had lower serum magnesium concentrations than those on diet alone (P<0.05). There were no independent associations between serum magnesium or metformin therapy and either CHD or CVD at baseline. Incident CVD, but not CHD, was independently and inversely associated with serum magnesium (hazard ratio (95% CI) 0.28 (0.11–0.74); P = 0.010), but metformin therapy was not a significant variable in these models. Since hypomagnesemia appears to be an independent risk factor for CVD complicating type 2 diabetes, the value of replacement therapy should be investigated further, especially in patients at high CVD risk. Continue reading >>

Avoid Dangerous Interactions When Taking Supplements

Avoid Dangerous Interactions When Taking Supplements

Diuretics like HCTZ, furosemide, dandelion, berberine, neem, green tea and others Osteoporosis drugs ( Boniva , Fosamax, etc) Curcumin can be taken anytime, however, since it raises brain neurotransmitters like dopamine and serotonin, I suggest it as a morning supplement. Riboflavin supports adrenal, I think its ideally taken in the morning or lunch. Medicines and supplements that are best taken WITH food: Mineral supplements (iodine, magnesium, calcium, iron) Vitamin A, D, E or K (fat-soluble vitamins) best with fatty foods Anti-fungals like ketoconazole, itraconazole, nystatin Probiotics, its just easier than trying to take them on an empty stomach (results are the same) Herbal supplements (generally speaking) these should be taken with food. Medicines and supplements that are best taken at NIGHT: Ashwagandha (doesnt have to be though, some people find that it causes drowsiness) Goto kola (not a hard-fast rule, Ive heard reports of this actually causing insomnia) Statin cholesterol reducers (atorvastatin, lovastatin, pravastatin, etc) ACE inhibitors (like enalapril, fosinopril, captopril, lisinopril) ARB class of blood pressure pills (candesartan, etc) Minerals or dairy foods with minocycline or doxycycline ^*^ Grapefruit or pomegranate foods/supplements with statins HCTZ with vitamin D (raises calcium too much) 5-HTP with any antidepressant that raises serotonin (it may cause serotonin syndrome) St Johns wort with any antidepressant (same reason as 5-HTP above) Tyrosine with L-dopa drugs (Levodopa, Sinemet, etc) due to enhanced dopamine production Magnesium with Neurontin (Gabapentin). The drug binds magnesium in the gut (maybe useful to reduce HIGH magnesium levels, but not good if youre trying to maintain magnesium levels). Separate administration. Magnesium with Continue reading >>

Magnesium: The Forgotten Healer

Magnesium: The Forgotten Healer

Based on information from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium is practically a wonder drug. Yet few people know about it, and few doctors recommend it. It helps maintain muscles and nerves, regulates blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and prevents heart attacks. I first learned about magnesium (chemical symbol Mg) when my legs started becoming stiff and jumpy. It was a multiple sclerosis symptom, but what to do about it? The prescribed medicines stopped the spasms, but had the side effect of completely knocking me out. My muscles wouldn’t function at all. Then someone at a support group suggested I take magnesium. In two days, the spasms and jumpy legs stopped. I’ve taken it ever since. I didn’t realize it had all these other benefits until a comment from Patricia on this blog entry alerted me. Patricia told us about a book called The Magnesium Miracle by Dr. Carolyn Dean, an MD and naturopath. According to Dr. Dean, nearly 80% of Americans are deficient in magnesium, and it is often the primary factor in heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and most muscular problems. The NIH says, “Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body… [It] is involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis.” And according to our own Amy Campbell, “Results from three very large studies indicate that people who consume a diet rich in magnesium have a lower risk of getting Type 2 diabetes.” People with diabetes are more likely than those without to be low in magnesium. According to an article on About.com, “Elevated blood glucose levels increase the loss of magnesium in the urine, which in turn lowers blood levels of magnesium.” So getting enough magnesium is especially important in diabetes. In spite of Continue reading >>

Metformin And Magnesium Citrate Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin And Magnesium Citrate Drug Interactions - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Metformin and Magnesium citrate drug interactions - from FDA reports Drug interactions are reported among people who take Metformin and Magnesium citrate together. This review analyzes the effectiveness and drug interactions between Metformin and Magnesium citrate. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 82 people who take the same drugs from FDA , and is updated regularly. On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our original studies have been referenced on 400+ peer-reviewed medical publications, including: The Lancet, and Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 82 people who take Metformin, Magnesium citrate are studied. Most common drug interactions over time *: Eustachian tube disorder (inflammation of the middle ear, commonly affects the eustachian tube) Fibromyalgia (a long-term condition which causes pain all over the body) Gastrooesophageal reflux disease (stomach contents (food or liquid) leak backwards from the stomach into the oesophagus) Most common drug interactions by gender *: Ocular hyperaemia (an abnormally large amount of blood in eye) Blister (small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure) Cerebrovascular accident (sudden death of some brain cells due to lack of oxygen when the blood flow to the brain is impaired by blockage or rupture) Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (a progressive disease that makes it hard to breathe) Complex regional pain syndrome (long lasting pain condition most often affecting one of the limbs (arms, legs, hands, or feet)) Injection site haemorrhage (bleeding from injection site) Mental impairment (a condition affecting the body, perhaps through sight or hea Continue reading >>

Metformin | Michigan Medicine

Metformin | Michigan Medicine

Metformin is a drug used to lower blood sugar levels in people with non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes . Types of interactions: Beneficial Adverse Check Metformin therapy has been shown to deplete vitamin B12, and sometimes, but not always, folic acid as well. This depletion occurs through the interruption of a calcium-dependent mechanism. People taking metformin should supplement vitamin B12 and folic acid or ask their doctor to monitor folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. Metformin therapy has been shown to deplete vitamin B12, and sometimes, but not always, folic acid as well. People taking metformin should supplement vitamin B12 and folic acid or ask their doctor to monitor folic acid and vitamin B12 levels. The interaction is supported by preliminary,weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence. In a small, controlled study, guar gum plus metformin slowed the rate of metformin absorption. In people with diabetes this interaction could reduce the blood sugar-lowering effectiveness of metformin. Until more is known, metformin should be taken two hours before or two hours after guar gum-containing supplements. It remains unclear whether the small amounts of guar gum found in many processed foods is enough to significantly affect metformin absorption. The interaction is supported by preliminary,weak, fragmentary, and/or contradictory scientific evidence. In a preliminary trial, administration of Ginkgo biloba extract (120 mg per day) for three months to patients with type 2 diabetes who were taking oral anti-diabetes medication resulted in a significant worsening of glucose tolerance. Ginkgo did not impair glucose tolerance in individuals whose diabetes was controlled by diet. Individuals taking oral anti-diabetes medication should consult a doctor b Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Herbs To Avoid On Metformin

Herbs To Avoid On Metformin

Metformin is usually prescribed for Type 2 diabetes patients who have trouble maintaining consistent blood sugar levels. As a general rule, it is unsafe to take any herbs, supplements or vitamins while taking metformin unless you have the express approval of your doctor. Many of these over-the-counter substances can lower your blood sugar too much or make the metformin less effective in controlling your blood sugar. Before taking any herbs with this medication, talk to your doctor and pharmacist to ensure safety. Video of the Day Metformin is a type of antidiabetic drug called a biguanide. It is used primarily to lower blood sugar in Type 2 diabetics, but it is also used to treat the side effects of polycystic ovarian syndrome and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Some side effects include headache, muscle pain, weakness, mild nausea, vomiting, gas and diarrhea. Take this medication with a meal to avoid some of these side effects, and you should take vitamin B-12 to avoid the deficiency metformin can sometimes cause. Some supplements and herbs lower your blood sugar and can make it drop too low when you're taking metformin. Herbs and supplements in this category include ipriflavone, chromium, ginseng, magnesium, vanadium, aloe, bitter melon, bilberry, burdock, dandelion, fenugreek, garlic, gymnema, lipoic acid and carmitine. St. John's wort and Dong quai can increase the sun sensitivity caused by metformin. Guar gum can interfere with the medication's absorption, and gingko biloba combined with metformin made glucose tolerance worse in patients -- their blood sugars remained higher with the combination. Metformin interacts with many prescription drugs, as well. Tell you doctor if you take the water pill Lasix, the heart medication digoxin or the antibiotic vancomycin. O Continue reading >>

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