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Can You Take Magnesium If You Are A Diabetic?

What Everyone With Type 2 Diabetes Should Know About Magnesium

What Everyone With Type 2 Diabetes Should Know About Magnesium

If you have type 2 diabetes and you don’t know whether you are magnesium deficient or if you are getting enough magnesium in your diet, then keep reading. It’s been confirmed in a recent World Journal of Diabetes report that most people who have type 2 diabetes have low magnesium, and since this mineral has a key role in blood sugar (glucose) control, it’s a good idea to understand how much you have, how much you need, and how it can help you. Read more about magnificent magnesium Magnesium and diabetes Magnesium plays a role in more than 300 biochemical activities in the body, and several of those activities are associated with magnesium metabolism, insulin, and glucose. Therefore, if blood (or plasma) levels of magnesium drop too low, anyone who has diabetes may expect to experience some difficulties. For example, according to a new study appearing in Diabetes, hypomagnesemia (defined as a serum level of less than 0.7 mmol/L of magnesium; see values below) “has been strongly associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus,” and that individuals with hypomagnesemia “show a more rapid disease progression and have an increased risk for diabetes complications.” It’s also been noted that older people with diabetes are more prone to hypomagnesemia, so it may be even more critical to check magnesium levels in older diabetics. The authors went on to explain that people with type 2 diabetes who are deficient in magnesium are more insulin resistant and have reduced activity in their beta cells, which are the insulin producing cells. Magnesium supplementation, however, has been shown to improve glucose metabolism, oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, magnesium deficiency, and sensitivity to insulin. At the same time, low dietary intake of magnesium has been associat Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dietary Supplements

Diabetes And Dietary Supplements

Can dietary supplements really help control diabetes? If you are like many people with diabetes, you might wonder whether the ads you have seen or heard are true. Take a few minutes to learn how diabetes and dietary supplements can be a good mix -- or a set-up for trouble. Dietary supplements are vitamins, minerals, and other nutritional components such as herbs. You take them by mouth. Dietary supplements can sometimes provide extra nutritional benefit to people with special health problems, including diabetes. However, most people with diabetes will still have to take traditional prescription medicine to keep their blood sugar levels in control. So far, there is not enough research to support specific recommendations for diabetes and dietary supplements. Ongoing studies point to two minerals that may be linked to blood sugar control. Chromium is needed to help the body use glucose effectively. However, more research is needed to see if taking a magnesium supplement will help control blood sugar levels in people who are not magnesium deficient. Magnesium levels are often low in people who have problems with insulin secretion and in people with complications of type 2 diabetes. Whether magnesium dietary supplements can help relieve or reduce these problems is still unknown. If you are not cautious, diabetes and dietary supplements can be a dangerous mix. Here's why: Some supplements have been found to be contaminated with substances other than those stated on the label. Some supplements may interact with medication or other supplements, such as herbs, increasing or decreasing their effects. St. John’s wort, for example, is known to have many drug interactions and should be avoided with other many other medications. The American Diabetes Association states that there i Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Type 2

Diabetes, Type 2

What is type 2 diabetes? Also called adult-onset diabetes, type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to properly use or ultimately make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate sugar, starches and other foods the body uses for energy. It is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions in the United States as a result of a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The upswing is also due to the increasing number of older people in the population. What are the symptoms? Many symptoms of diabetes such as excessive thirst or irritability, can seem unimportant, which is one of the reasons why the disease often goes undiagnosed. However, early detection is very important because it can reduce the odds of developing the dangerous complications of diabetes. Common symptoms include: Frequent urination Excessive thirst Extreme hunger Unusual weight loss Increased fatigue Irritability Blurry vision If high blood sugar levels are not brought under control via treatment type 2 diabetes (and type 1 diabetes as well) can lead to a number of serious complications: Eye damage: People with diabetes have a 40 percent higher than normal risk of developing glaucoma, increased pressure within the eye that can lead to vision loss. They are also 60 percent more likely than normal to develop cataracts, which cloud the lens of the eye, blocking light and blurring vision. They are also at risk of diabetic retinopathy, damage to the retina that is the leading cause of impaired vision in the United States. High blood pressure: This disorder occurs at twice the normal rate among diabetics. Heart disease: Deaths from heart disease among diabetics are two to four Continue reading >>

Oral Magnesium Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Metabolic Control In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

Oral Magnesium Supplementation Improves Insulin Sensitivity And Metabolic Control In Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

A randomized double-blind controlled trial Abstract OBJECTIVE—To determine whether oral magnesium supplementation (as magnesium chloride [MgCl2] solution) improves both insulin sensitivity and metabolic control in type 2 diabetic subjects with decreased serum magnesium levels. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This study was a clinical randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial. A total of 63 subjects with type 2 diabetes and decreased serum magnesium (serum magnesium levels ≤0.74 mmol/l) treated by glibenclamide received either 50 ml MgCl2 solution (containing 50 g MgCl2 per 1,000 ml solution) or placebo daily for 16 weeks. Chronic diarrhea, alcoholism, use of diuretic and/or calcium antagonist drugs, and reduced renal function were exclusion criteria. Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) was used as the parameter of insulin sensitivity and glucose and HbA1c as parameters of metabolic control. RESULTS—At the end of the study, subjects who received magnesium supplementation showed significant higher serum magnesium concentration (0.74 ± 0.10 vs. 0.65 ± 0.07 mmol/l, P = 0.02) and lower HOMA-IR index (3.8 ± 1.1 vs. 5.0 ± 1.3, P = 0.005), fasting glucose levels (8.0 ± 2.4 vs. 10.3 ± 2.1 mmol/l, P = 0.01), and HbA1c (8.0 ± 2.4 vs. 10.1 ± 3.3%, P = 0.04) than control subjects. CONCLUSIONS—Oral supplementation with MgCl2 solution restores serum magnesium levels, improving insulin sensitivity and metabolic control in type 2 diabetic patients with decreased serum magnesium levels. Hypomagnesemia, a frequent condition in patients with diabetes (1,2), could be involved in the development of poor metabolic control and chronic complications (3,4). A large body of evidence that shows a link between hypomagnesemia and reduction of tyrosine-k Continue reading >>

The Best Supplements For Diabetes

The Best Supplements For Diabetes

While eating a healthy diet (which includes mini-fasting) and exercising regularly are necessary to lower blood sugar naturally, these are not the only parts of my natural approach to managing diabetes. Nutritional support is also a key component of achieving healthy blood sugar levels. Supplements to Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels Are Critical One reason nutritional support is so important is because diabetes is a nutritional wasting disease. Elevated glucose levels act like a diuretic and cause substantial loss of nutrients in the urine. Therefore, people with type 2 diabetes are likely to be deficient in important water-soluble vitamins and minerals. Incredibly, most experts specializing in diabetes make no attempt whatsoever to replace lost nutrients, leaving their patients to suffer the inevitable consequences of nutritional deficiencies. A second reason nutritional supplements are essential is that certain nutrients work to support your body’s ability to use insulin, which can help you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Anyone who has diabetes should—at a minimum—take a high-quality vitamin and mineral supplement every day. Research has shown that taking a potent daily multivitamin dramatically reduces the incidence of infection and the number of sick days taken by patients with type 2 diabetes. Must-Have Supplements for Diabetes In addition to a multivitamin, make sure you are getting the following nutrients to help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Many are included in multivitamins, but not always at the dosages I recommend. If your multi comes up short, supplement with additional doses of the specific nutrients until you’re taking the recommended amount. B-Complex Vitamins Vitamins B6 and B12 specifically support nerve health, which is critic Continue reading >>

Magnesium And Diabetes

Magnesium And Diabetes

Share: This blog will explore the ins and outs of magnesium. Why we need it, how much we need, foods high in magnesium, medications that affect magnesium status and what the research is showing about the relationship it has to diabetes. Magnesium in the Human Body Did you know that magnesium makes up approximately 0.05 percent of the human body? (1) This may seem to be a very small amount, but magnesium is the fourth most common mineral contained in the body. (2) An adult human body contains approximately 25 grams of magnesium. (3) It is involved in over 300 metabolic reactions and almost half is contained in our bones, almost all of the other half is in our body organs and tissues and only 1 percent is found in our blood. (2) Most adults need between 310-420 mg/day of dietary magnesium but is estimated that only 40 percent of people in the United States eat the recommended amounts. You can look at the amounts needed by age groups and for pregnant and lactating women here. It is speculated that the lack of dietary magnesium contributes to many chronic diseases. Chronic inflammatory stress has been shown to be influenced by low magnesium levels which may be a factor in obesity. (2) Magnesium is a necessary component for important functions in every part of the body. This includes protein synthesis, energy metabolism, muscle contraction (including the heart), blood pressure and nerve function. We must not forget that magnesium is also involved in the metabolism of both insulin and glucose. (2) Its relationship to diabetes will be discussed later in the article. Please note that taking excessive supplementary magnesium can be toxic. The upper limit of safety for adults and children over the age of 9 years is 350 mg/day. 350 mg/day for adults and children ages 9 and up. (4) Continue reading >>

Magnesium Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Magnesium Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Dec. 23, 2003 -- Want to reduce your diabetes risk? Make a spinach salad your next meal, with a side of whole-wheat bread or almonds. Two new studies suggest magnesium-rich foods like these can significantly lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, even in obese people who are at high risk for the disease. Earlier studies linked magnesium deficiency with an increased risk for diabetes. The latest findings carry this observation further by confirming the mineral's role in protecting against the disease. The larger of the two studies involved roughly 85,000 women and 42,000 men who completed dietary intake questionnaires every two to four years. The smaller study had a similar design and involved just under 40,000 women who were 45 or older. Both studies were conducted by researchers from Harvard University, and both are published in the January 2004 issue of the journal Diabetes Care. In the larger study, the female subjects were followed for 18 years and the men for 12, during which time roughly 5,400 people developed type 2 diabetes. Even after taking into account diabetes risk factors such as age, weight, physical activity, smoking, and family history, those with the highest dietary levels of magnesium were found to have significantly lower risk for type 2 diabetes compared with those with the lowest magnesium levels. The risk remained significant even after the researchers adjusted for other dietary variables associated with type 2 diabetes risk, such as fat fiber and glycemic load. The risk reduction was similar in the second study. So if eating leafy green vegetables, nuts, and other magnesium-rich foods is good, is taking magnesium in supplement form an even better way to protect against diabetes? Diabetes expert Jerry Nadler, MD, says it not clear whether su Continue reading >>

Can Magnesium Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes?

Can Magnesium Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes?

There have been several significant studies about magnesium's role in preventing type 2 diabetes and improving insulin resistance Higher magnesium intake reduces risk of impaired glucose and insulin metabolism and slows progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes For each 100 milligrams of magnesium consumed in a day, the risk of diabetes is decreased by 15 percent By Dr. Mercola Magnesium is often thought of primarily as a mineral for your heart and bones, but this is misleading. Researchers have now detected 3,751 magnesium-binding sites on human proteins, indicating that its role in human health and disease may have been vastly underestimated.1 Magnesium is also found in more than 300 different enzymes in your body, including some of those that help regulate blood sugar. This is one mechanism by which magnesium may keep diabetes at bay – a finding that's been gaining increasing scientific support. Magnesium May Lower Your Risk of Diabetes There have been several significant studies about magnesium's role in keeping your metabolism running efficiently—specifically in terms of insulin sensitivity, glucose regulation, and protection from type 2 diabetes. Higher magnesium intake reduces risk of impaired glucose and insulin metabolism and slows progression from pre-diabetes to diabetes in middle-aged Americans.2 Researchers stated, "Magnesium intake may be particularly beneficial in offsetting your risk of developing diabetes, if you are high risk." In addition, a meta-analysis of seven studies showed that for each 100 milligrams (mg) of magnesium consumed in a day, the risk of diabetes is decreased by 15 percent.3 Those researchers concluded, "Magnesium intake was inversely associated with incidence of type 2 diabetes." A meta-analysis of 13 studies conducted in 2011 s Continue reading >>

Magnesium: The Forgotten Healer

Magnesium: The Forgotten Healer

Based on information from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), magnesium is practically a wonder drug. Yet few people know about it, and few doctors recommend it. It helps maintain muscles and nerves, regulates blood sugar levels, promotes normal blood pressure, and prevents heart attacks. I first learned about magnesium (chemical symbol Mg) when my legs started becoming stiff and jumpy. It was a multiple sclerosis symptom, but what to do about it? The prescribed medicines stopped the spasms, but had the side effect of completely knocking me out. My muscles wouldn’t function at all. Then someone at a support group suggested I take magnesium. In two days, the spasms and jumpy legs stopped. I’ve taken it ever since. I didn’t realize it had all these other benefits until a comment from Patricia on this blog entry alerted me. Patricia told us about a book called The Magnesium Miracle by Dr. Carolyn Dean, an MD and naturopath. According to Dr. Dean, nearly 80% of Americans are deficient in magnesium, and it is often the primary factor in heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and most muscular problems. The NIH says, “Magnesium is needed for more than 300 biochemical reactions in the body… [It] is involved in energy metabolism and protein synthesis.” And according to our own Amy Campbell, “Results from three very large studies indicate that people who consume a diet rich in magnesium have a lower risk of getting Type 2 diabetes.” People with diabetes are more likely than those without to be low in magnesium. According to an article on About.com, “Elevated blood glucose levels increase the loss of magnesium in the urine, which in turn lowers blood levels of magnesium.” So getting enough magnesium is especially important in diabetes. In spite of Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Minerals

Vitamins And Minerals

Tweet Depending on the type of treatment regimen you use to control your diabetes, there are some vitamins and minerals that may be beneficial for your condition. Before adding any vitamins or adding dietary supplements to your daily diet, discuss these changes with your healthcare team and doctor to ensure they are safe alongside any prescribed medication you're on. ALA and GLA ALA (alpha-lipoic acid) is a versatile and potent antioxidant, and may function to help diabetic neuropathy and reduce pain from free-radical damage. Also, some studies link ALA to decreased insulin resistance and thus the control of blood sugar. GLA (gamma-lipoic acid) is another naturally occurring antioxidant that is present in evening primrose oil, borage oil and blackcurrant seed oil. GLA may improve the function of nerves damaged by diabetic neuropathy. Biotin Biotin works in synergy with insulin in the body, and independently increases the activity of the enzyme glucokinase. Glucokinase is responsible for the first step of glucose utilisation, and is therefore an essential component of normal bodily functioning. Glucokinase occurs only in the liver, and in sufferers from diabetes its concentration may be extremely low. Supplements of biotin may have a significant effect on glucose levels for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Carnitine (L-Carnitine, Acetyl L-Carnitine) Carnitine is required by the body in order to correctly use body fat in the production of energy. It is naturally occurring and derives from hydrophilic amino acids. Diabetics who try carnitine generally respond well, and high levels of fat in the bloodstream (cholesterol and triglycerides) may fall fast. Carnitine helps to break down fatty acids in the body and binds acyl residues. For these reasons, it may be useful to pre Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

Magnesium And Diabetes: Reduce Blood Sugar Now!

Magnesium And Diabetes: Reduce Blood Sugar Now!

Magnesium is the second most abundant mineral in our body. Considering we have so much, it’s obviously needed for a ton of stuff. It’s a vital nutrient that drives close to 300 different biochemical reactions in the body. One of these critical functions is ensuring that our blood sugar remains within the right range. The connection between having adequate magnesium and diabetes prevention is deep. Magnesium can help prevent diabetes if you don’t have it yet. If you are diabetic, it can help you control blood sugar better. We’re meant to get magnesium from a variety of foods, including dairy. And yet an astounding 80% of Americans are deficient in this mineral. Is it any wonder then that heart diseases, hypertension, and diabetes are on such a sharp rise in the United States? The relationship between magnesium and diabetes mellitus is crucial. Here’s why: Magnesium helps muscle cells relax, so insulin resistance goes down. Cells allow more sugar in. Blood sugar goes down. The heart is a muscle. Magnesium helps the heart relax and lowers risk of cardiac issues in diabetics. When magnesium is sufficient, it prevents calcium deposition in the inner walls of blood vessels. This helps prevent hardening of arteries. Magnesium is important for the production of energy. Diabetics often feel tired because proper energy production is an issue. Magnesium helps convert excess of glucose in the blood into glycogen. This gets stored in the liver. Excess sugar is removed from the blood. Magnesium helps antioxidants like Glutathione do their job in our body. Antioxidants help slow down aging. Diabetics face more oxidative stress than non-diabetics. This causes diabetic complications across the whole body. Diabetics often complain of feeling pins and needles or numbness in thei Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Why You Might Need More Magnesium If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

Why You Might Need More Magnesium If You Have Type 2 Diabetes

You already know that managing type 2 diabetes well means you need to make certain dietary changes, but did you know the disease can also lead to nutrient deficiencies that in turn make it harder to stabilize your blood sugar? In particular, people with diabetes tend to be deficient in magnesium, which is a mineral that plays a role in nearly 300 biochemical or enzymatic reactions in the body, says Vandana Sheth, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics based in Torrance, California. Magnesium is involved in protein synthesis, muscle and nerve function, and — key for people who are managing diabetes — blood pressure and glucose control, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Sounds important, right? It is. So it’s easy to see how being deficient can negatively affect the way your body performs. The Relationship Between Risk of Diabetes and Magnesium Deficiency Magnesium deficiency has been linked to insulin resistance, which is central to the development of type 2 diabetes, research shows. On the flip side, increasing your intake of magnesium has been shown to possibly lower your risk of developing the chronic disease. Research suggests consuming 100 milligrams (mg) of magnesium through eating foods rich in the mineral may decrease the risk of diabetes by 15 percent. Researchers noted more study would be needed before recommending a magnesium supplement to prevent diabetes. Not as many studies have looked into the relationship between type 2 diabetes and magnesium once you have already been diagnosed, though one study published in August 2015 in the World Journal of Diabetes noted that people with the disease who are deficient in magnesium may be more likely to have complications, such as issues with heart health. Accordin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Supplements Overview

Type 2 Diabetes: Supplements Overview

Key Points There is limited scientific evidence on the effectiveness of dietary supplements as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for type 2 diabetes. The evidence that is available is not sufficiently strong to prove that any of the six supplements discussed in this report have benefits for type 2 diabetes or its complications. A possible exception may be the use of omega-3 fatty acids to lower triglyceridea levels. It is very important not to replace conventional medical therapy for diabetes with an unproven CAM therapy. To ensure a safe and coordinated course of care, people should inform their health care providers about any CAM therapy that they are currently using or considering. The six dietary supplements reviewed in this report appear to be generally safe at low-to-moderate doses. However, each can interact with various prescription medications, affecting the action of the medications. People with type 2 diabetes need to know about these risks and discuss them with their health care provider. Prescribed medicines may need to be adjusted if a person is also using a CAM therapy. aTerms that are underlined are defined in the dictionary at the end of this report. 1. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic condition in which the body cannot properly convert food into energy. Most food that a person eats is eventually broken down into blood glucose (also called blood sugar), which cells need for energy and growth. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose enter cells. In people with diabetes, the body does not make enough insulin, or it does not respond to insulin properly. This causes glucose to build up in the blood instead of moving into the cells. The most common type of diabetes is type 2 diabetes (formerly called adult-onset diabetes or noninsulin-depen Continue reading >>

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