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Can You Stop Taking Januvia Cold Turkey

Why Trulicity Could Be A Truly Dreadful Diabetes Drug

Why Trulicity Could Be A Truly Dreadful Diabetes Drug

This is certainly turning out to be a bumper year for new diabetes drugs, which seem to be getting approved at an unprecedented rate. The latest one is called Trulicity, a once-a-week injection from Eli Lilly and Co, which has been fast-tracked onto both the American and European markets, despite serious concerns over its safety. Trulicity sounds like a character from a Julie Andrews musical and your brain will unconsciously associate the name with truth, simplicity and felicity (happiness). But a spoonful of sugar won’t make this very nasty medicine go down. It comes with an FDA ‘black box’ warning about its risks of medullary thyroid cancer and other thyroid tumours, while very similar drugs have previously been linked with acute pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. Trulicity’s generic name is dulaglutide and it belongs to a class of drugs called GLP-1 receptor agonists that already includes exenatide (Byetta), liraglutide (Victoza) and albiglutide (Tanzeum). Also known as ‘incretin mimics’ – synthetic versions of a natural body chemical that inhibits the release of glucose from your liver into your blood stream – they work in the same way as another closely-related group of drugs called DPP-4 inhibitors. All of these drugs have a history of adverse side effects and serious health risks. As I wrote here, people taking Byetta or the DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin (Januvia) are twice as likely as those taking other kinds of diabetes medication to find themselves in hospital with acute pancreatitis, a condition that can lead to deadly pancreatic cancer. Tanzeum comes with warnings of thyroid C-cell tumours, acute pancreatitis and kidney damage, while Victoza also carries a warning of pancreatitis and has been associated with an increased risk of thyroid tumou Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Stopping Metformin

The Effects Of Stopping Metformin

The medication metformin is a drug in the biguanide family that is used to treat type 2 or adult-onset diabetes mellitus. Drugs.com notes that metformin is often the first prescribed medication for individuals with type 2 diabetes and may also be used in combination with other diabetes medications or insulin. This medication is sold under the brand name Glucophage, Glucophage XR and Fortamet. Metformin helps to reduce glycemic or sugar levels in the blood in a number of ways. If an individual with type 2 diabetes stops taking metformin, they may experience serious immediate and long-term effects of uncontrolled high levels of blood glucose. Video of the Day A primary mode of action of metformin is increasing the sensitivity of the body’s muscles, tissues and cells to insulin--a hormone that is essential for transporting glucose from the blood to the body. Drugs.com notes that individuals with type 2 diabetes have insulin resistance. This causes the cells to ignore the effects of insulin and not allow glucose to be transported into the muscles and tissues where it is vital to produce energy. The body tries to compensate by secreting more insulin, which only leads to hyperinsulinemia in the blood. If a patient stops taking metformin, the type 2 diabetes effects occur due to insulin resistance causing symptoms such as severe thirst, hunger and urinary frequency. The chronic levels of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also contribute to diseases of the heart and vascular-blood vessel-system. Gluconeogenesis is the production of glucose by the liver. A storage supply of glucose is reserved in the liver and released into the bloodstream when the body requires energy due to stress or hunger. The MayoClinic.com notes that another one of the mechanisms of metformin to reduce Continue reading >>

Can I Quit My Meds Cold Turkey?? - Abc Homeopathy Forum

Can I Quit My Meds Cold Turkey?? - Abc Homeopathy Forum

I'm a Type II diabetic, 66 y/o male, diagnosed about 5 years ago. I want to try natural remedies to control my sugar. Right now, I'm using Metformin 500mg twice a day, Glipizide 5mg 1 a day, and Januvia 1 a day. I also take Ramipril. Can I stop these meds cold? This is an internet forum. Posts are not from medical professionals. Then how do I get off the meds and on the natural supplements? Slow and steady wins the race. Please don't quit your current medication at once. Work on the correct remedy that is the best match with your state and symptoms. Then, slowly phase out of the allopathic world! Nawaz's advice is sound. Firstly, you should find a practitioner to help you through this process. Diabetes is serious, and without qualified and experienced care you could get yourself into trouble. Homoeopathy is not about natural supplements, it is about finding a cure for your condition. Type 2 diabetes can be cured with homoeopathy, although it is not always easy. However, a patient should only be weaned off their medication AFTER the homoeopathy has begun to make a marked difference to their blood sugar levels, not before. No patient on orthodox medication should stop them 'cold turkey', certainly not without a health professional to manage their situation. For most of my patients, I never ask them to consider even reducing their meds until after I can see a marked and stable improvement. You indeed have a long life. Now, you must believe me, I was going to request you to take this case. To give him a head start, I was going to request him to visit the following links. Diabetes is not a condition that I would feel comfortable managing over an internet forum. I do manage such cases in clinic so I can say that it is possible to cure them. It is not easy, but it is possible Continue reading >>

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

Yet Another Problem With Januvia

UPDATE (April 2, 2013): Before you take Byetta, Victoza, Onglyza, or Januvia please read about the new research that shows that they, and probably all incretin drugs, cause severely abnormal cell growth in the pancreas and precancerous tumors. You'll find that information HERE. Update (January, 2009) : A much more important problem with Januvia--that it promotes cancer by inhibiting a tumor suppressor gene researchers have called "the trigger for prostate cancer"--is discussed in this more recent blog post: More Research Shows Januvia and Glinides Inhibit Tumor Suppressor Gene DPP-4. Posted Dec 8, 2008. Original Post: If you have had or might get melanoma, ovarian cancer, lung cancer or prostate cancer, please read the above post before making your decision about whether Januvia is for you. Here is the original post that was posted 9/12/08: I have been hearing from people about a new, and, to me, very troubling problem with Januvia. The problem is this: now that doctors have decided that all people recently diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes should be put on Januvia, prescriptions for the combination drug Janumet, which is made up of both Januvia and Metformin, are becoming much more frequent as a first prescription for diabetes. Metformin is a very safe drug that has been used safely for decades. The most recent follow up to the UKPDS study, the 20 year follow-up, which was just presented at the annual EASD conference found that at 20 years after the start of the study, "Patients treated with metformin had a 21% reduction in risk of any diabetes endpoint (P=0.01), a 30% reduction in risk of diabetes-related death (P=0.01), a 33% reduction in risk of MI (P=0.005), and a 27% reduction in risk of all cause mortality (P=0.002)." Metformin is a very good drug for people with Ty Continue reading >>

How To Stop Taking Actos

How To Stop Taking Actos

1 Answer (question resolved) - Posted in: actos - Answer: Highly likely you wont experience any symptoms but if your blood When can I stop taking Actos? Just quit cold turkey? Reactions? Posted 4 Nov Are there any withdrawal symptoms after discontinues use of actos? Posted 27 Jul 2011 1 For Diabetes, Type 2 I have been taking Actos for 5 years. Recently the cardiologist diagnosed me with heart failure. My EF is 30%. 2 weeks ago I stopped taking Actos and my fasting blood test is 125 the same reading as when I was taking Actos. I finally asked my cardioligist, he immediately said it was the Actos. I have stopped taking Actos for 4 days now, I cant say at this point I feel better or less tired but my blood sugars are low 60 to 70 without the Actos. Dont Risk it people. Dont take this drug. I am very concerned as a diabetic with problematic blood circulation 12 Jan 2011 She said she takes metformin (Glucophage and others), sitagliptin ( brand name Januvia), and pioglitazone (Actos) for diabetes, lisinopril (Privinil, Zestril) for blood pressure, Lifestyle changes can [reduce] the need for long-term medications, and sometimes enable people to stop taking them altogether 19 Oct 2016 If Avandia or Actos is already part of your diabetes treatment plan, take the drug as prescribed. Although an increased risk of heart attack, heart failure or bladder cancer is nothing to take lightly, the risk isnt considered an emergency. You should not stop taking any diabetes medication without first 4 Jun 2012 As much as possible, take this medication around the same of the day. If taking other drugs, follow your healthcare providers directions carefully. Do not stop taking any of the drugs unless specifically instructed. Actos should be used along with healthy diabetic diet, exercise plan Continue reading >>

Januvia Smackdown

Januvia Smackdown

Get your ringside seats, Folks! A while back I posted about the Merck's new Type 2 oral drug Januvia (What It Doesn't Do), explaining how it apparently trumps competitors in terms of patient "tolerability." No other post has ever generated such ongoing reader energy, both positive and negative. Nearly every day, several new commentors weigh in, duking it out over the relative merits of Januvia. Most everyone seems to agree that Januvia reduces appetite, which is a good thing. But then again, Byetta is known for that effect as well. The key is question whether Januvia fulfills its core function of lowering blood glucose (BG) levels, and lives up to its no-side-effects promise. As of today, the score stands pretty much tied, as such: Total comments = 50 Positive = 10 Negative = 13 Mixed = 16 (liked some aspects of the drug but not others) Neutral = 11 (those asking or responding to questions only) Among the most vocal of the Pro Team: "I take Januvia and have for 6 months. I have no side effects. I have experienced a decrease in appetite. I have had no headaches or respiratory problems. My BG has gone down. It is a great drug." -- Mike "Januvia has been a positive thing for me. My sugar levels dropped from 240+ to 110 +/- 10 after fasting. I have taken 100 mg once per day for a month... I am not as hungry as before usage." -- Jim K. L. "I've been on Januvia for a little over three months and have lost over 15 pounds which I had put on with Actos. I've experienced no side effects, other than I am not hungry all of the time. For me it has been very effective..." -- Bill "I am substantially less hungry then I have felt in years ... and my BG hovers around 100 - 120 between meals/fasting, and 120 - 160 for a few hours after a heavy carb meal. The usual BG spikes of 180 - 200+ Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

WHAT IS JANUVIA®? JANUVIA (jah-NEW-vee-ah) is a once-daily prescription pill that, along with diet and exercise, helps lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. JANUVIA should not be used in patients with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). If you have had pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas), it is not known if you have a higher chance of getting it while taking JANUVIA. Serious side effects can happen in people who take JANUVIA, including pancreatitis, which may be severe and lead to death. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you've ever had pancreatitis. Stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away if you have pain in your stomach area (abdomen) that is severe and will not go away. The pain may be felt going from your abdomen through to your back. The pain may happen with or without vomiting. These may be symptoms of pancreatitis. Before you start taking JANUVIA, tell your doctor if you have ever had heart failure (your heart does not pump blood well enough) or have problems with your kidneys. Contact your doctor right away if you have increasing shortness of breath or trouble breathing (especially when you lie down); swelling or fluid retention (especially in the feet, ankles, or legs); an unusually fast increase in weight; or unusual tiredness. These may be symptoms of heart failure. Do not take JANUVIA if you are allergic to any of its ingredients, including sitagliptin. Symptoms of serious allergic reactions to JANUVIA, including rash, hives, and swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty breathing or swallowing, can occur. If you have any symptoms of a serious allergic reaction, stop taking JANUVIA and call your doctor right away. Kid Continue reading >>

Getting Off Meds, Januvia

Getting Off Meds, Januvia

I've only posted here once before (in the new subscriber section). I've been a Type 2 diabetic since 1993. Had ups and down over the past 24 years, but I've done fairly well with keeping things under control. During the last 9 months I've made another push. I've lost 24 pounds (gone from 144 to 120). My HbA1c was 5.5 last week. I've been eating a ketogenic diet. All tests for ketones in last couple of months have been moderate to high (I use the urine strips.) I feel good. I quit taking the Statin I was on and the blood pressure medication (lisinopril). I take 1000 mg X 2 of Metformin and 100 mg Januvia. The only meds I'm on now. On my own, I tried to stop taking the Januvia. My numbers went from 90s to 115 within a couple of days, so I started taking it again. I went to see my doctor yesterday. What a disaster! He's a Type 1 and sees everything from that perspective. For the last two visits, he has tried to convince me to eat more carbs and start taking a sulfanyurea to cover it. Yesterday, all he wanted to talk about were my "lows." I gave him my BG results for several months. There were a number of results that were below 80. (The BGs were between 64 and 78---As far as I'm concerned that was a sign of my progress!) He didn't like that I quit taking the Statin or the lisinopril. The conversation didn't go well. He ended the conversation by saying that in a while, when I want to start taking the sulfynurea come back and see him. However, over the past week or so, my BGs have been going up. (My average of the past few months has been 93). Now, it's more like 110. I just got a 146 when I've only had 1 cup of homemade mushroom soup. (Very little carb in it. I know, I made it.) I can't explain this. Also, I've noticed a slight ringing in my ears, which I've read is a side Continue reading >>

Can Januvia Cause Withdrawal Symptoms?

Can Januvia Cause Withdrawal Symptoms?

I have been having a feeling of fullness in my upper chest and pain in my back. I thought I was gaining weight as my bra felt tighter in that area. I also had been having constipation issues and could not have a decent bowel movement. After seeing a P.A. at a gastroenterologist office she put me on Miralax and more Citrucel to get me moving. That did help my constipation but did not help the fullness under my breast bone. I had my Family Physician run blood tests for my liver as I had not been feeling well. Those came back normal. A few months later I was still not feeling well and I saw my F.P. again. It seemed as though a light went on in his head and he looked very concerned. He said he would take me off the medication Januvia that I had been taking for some years and put me on Metformin. About 2 days later I was back in his office and I was having severe pain in the same area in my abdomen and pain in my upper back. I was in serious pain and I started crying. I had been waking up with a headache like I had never had before. My body was aching like I had the flu and my lymph-nodes all over my body were hurting like crazy. I did not have any respiratory problems to go with this event. I was in shock at how bad I felt. I told the doctor all this and I think he did not believe me. He gave me some painkiller that causes constipation so I took a 1/2 a pill and did not take anymore. I did not need any more incidents with constipation. I am wondering what caused all this because I still have abdominal pain and back pain after this incident. I was thinking that I had a withdrawal from the Januvia. Has any one else had an event like this after stopping Januvia? I would like to hear about it or if you know of anyone that has had an experience like this. Thanks I just stop Jan Continue reading >>

User Profile

User Profile

Quitting nexium cold turkeyI decided to quit Nexium cold turkey and i heard about the acid reflux rebound problem. I read in one of the posts that one member took Nexium for a few months and quit cold turkey. She mentions that she had rebound for a few weeks and felt much better after that . My question is. I've been on Nexium for 4 years.I've been on Omeprazole for over 10 years and quit cold turkey; I've been on Omeprazole for over 10 years and quit cold turkey. NexiumI don't think you will have a problem quitting nexium, except you probably still need some kind of acid reducer. If this is about money, have your doctor prescribe Tips to help you quit Prilosec cold turkey! and hopefully it will help you figure out how to get off nexium taking Nexium cold turkey.after of nexium. I tried quitting it cold turkey by Nexium, a proton pump inhibitor, is a prescription medicine used to prevent heartburn and protect the esophagus from damage caused by acid reflux. TheAnyone out there who's been able to quit Nexium, is probably rebound reflux from going 'cold turkey' off the nexium. Nexium rebound withdrawal. Nexium and Quitting ranitidine - What is zantac ? Antiacid stomach med. Zantac is a histamine-2 which blocks acid secretion in the stomach.A LETTER FROM EUNICE F., DIAGNOSED WITH H. PYLORI AND ACID REFLUX: Most sites tell you they have found the secret with much To know the differences between acetaminophen and ibuprofen , it's helpful to understand their pros and cons. Acetaminophen Pros: AceHi Claudia. Please do not try to withdraw from tramadol at home on your own. The idea is to get a feel for the schedule and then consult your prescribing doctor for a There Are A Variety Of Common Conditions Which Affect Women Specifically. Here Are A Number Of Them How They Can Be M Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Farxiga

What You Should Know About Farxiga

You and your doctor may have discussed the benefits as well as the possible risks of taking FARXIGA (far-SEE-guh), and how it may help you achieve your treatment goals. Potential benefits of using FARXIGA for adults with type 2 diabetes, in addition to diet and exercise: FARXIGA is a once-daily pill for adults with type 2 diabetes who need improvement in A1C and additionally may benefit from weight and systolic blood pressure reduction. Patients experienced an average 3% weight loss when used with metformin In studies, FARXIGA: Additionally, FARXIGA may help you: FARXIGA is not a weight-loss or blood-pressure drug. Individual results may vary. ‡When used with metformin. Do not take FARXIGA if you: have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA FARXIGA has been tested in 24 clinical studies that looked at its benefits and safety. The studies had more than 11,000 adults with type 2 diabetes, including more than 6,000 patients treated with FARXIGA. FARXIGA, combined with diet and exercise, was studied alone as well as in combination with other diabetes medicines you may be taking. The other medicines included metformin, glimepiride, pioglitazone, insulin, and sitagliptin. See the What is the most important information I should know about FARXIGA? section. Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidn Continue reading >>

Sitagliptin Phosphate Related Drug Withdrawal Syndrome

Sitagliptin Phosphate Related Drug Withdrawal Syndrome

sitagliptin related drug withdrawal syndrome sitagliptin phosphate related drug withdrawal syndrome * Warning: The facts and figures contained in these reports are accurate to the best of our capability; however, our metrics are only meant to augment your medical knowledge, and should never be used as the sole basis for selecting a new medication. As with any medical decision, be sure to work with your doctor to ensure the best choices are made for your condition. * About FAERS: The FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) is used by FDA for activities such as looking for new safety concerns that might be related to a marketed product, evaluating a manufacturer's compliance to reporting regulations and responding to outside requests for information. Reporting of adverse events is a voluntary process, and not every report is sent to FDA and entered into FAERS. The FAERS database may contain duplicate reports, the report quality is variable, and many factors may influence reporting (e.g., media attention, length of time a drug is marketed, market share). For these reasons, FAERS case reports cannot be used to calculate incidence or estimates of risk for a particular product or compare risks between products. Continue reading >>

Stopping Diabetes Medicines

Stopping Diabetes Medicines

“I want to get off some of these drugs,” Ellen told me. “But my doctor says I need them. I’m on three for glucose, two for blood pressure, and one for depression. They’re costing me hundreds every month. What can I do?” Ellen is a health-coaching client of mine, age 62 with Type 2 diabetes. She works as an executive secretary in an insurance company. It’s stressful. She’s usually there from 8 AM until 6 PM or later and comes home “too tired to exercise.” She mentioned that just “putting herself together” for work every day requires an hour of prep time. “You have to look good for these executives,” she says. I asked about her drugs. She said she takes metformin (Glucophage and others), sitagliptin ( brand name Januvia), and pioglitazone (Actos) for diabetes, lisinopril (Privinil, Zestril) for blood pressure, simvastatin (Zocor) for cholesterol, and paroxetine (Paxil) for depression. Her A1C is now at 7.3%, down from a high of 9.9% a year ago, when she was on only two medicines. “I think the drugs are depressing me,” she said. “The cost, the side effects… I have nausea most days, I have cough from the lisinopril. That doesn’t help at work. I don’t know what’s worse, the drugs or diabetes.” What would you have said to Ellen? Although I strongly believe in reducing drug use, I told her what most experts say, that she can get off some, possibly all diabetes drugs, but it will take a lot of work. Asqual Getaneh, MD, a diabetes expert who writes for Everyday Health, says that doctors want to be “assured that an A1C will stay down” if a person goes off medicines. She says doctors usually won’t reduce medicines until A1C drops below 7.0%. In the ADA publication Diabetes Forecast, pharmacist Craig Williams, PharmD, writes, “Unf Continue reading >>

Januvia? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Januvia? - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. When I was first diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes years ago, I asked my doctor about Januvia. He was not a fan and said he did not feel that it worked. He gave me a sample bottle and I tried it. I did not see any difference at all. That doctor has since retired. I went to my current PCP last week. my A1C was high so my doctor added Januvia to my medicines (Lantus and Humalog). I told him at that time last week that I had tried Januvia before with no results. He wanted me to try it again. The doctors office submitted the RX to Optum RX and I received the medicine yesterday. I took one pill yesterday as directed. I went to bed last night with blood sugar sugar of 73. This morning I woke up with a blood sugar reading of 175. This has been my problem prior to taking Januvia. The other problem is that I am billed $140 for a 3 month RX of Januvia that I am now on the hook for. If it does not work, I am still having to pay for this prescription that does not work, I can't afford to do that. I have called the doctors office and am waiting om a return call. My question is, does Januvia work? I have only taken one pill but read on the internet that Januvia works immediately. What are your experiences with Januvia? Is there anything I can do since I do not believe it works? Is there a way to try other medicines that may work better without paying $140 to try? My doctor has never given me samples of any medicine. I do not know if he has samples. Any insight you could provide would be greatly appreciated. I tried Januvia years ago, was on it for a couple or three years at the highest dose at $100.00 per month. As I really got to looking at all the side effects and le Continue reading >>

Stopping Metformin - Topics - Medschat

Stopping Metformin - Topics - Medschat

Tingling/burning sensation after stopping Metformin So about a year ago I was prescribed Metformin because my doctor diagnosed me as pre-diabetic (she also said it would help with my PCOS as well). If I had known she was going to do a spot check on me that morning, I wouldn't have eaten cold pizza for breakfast. Anywho, since then I have been taking 500mg Metformin every night. I had lost 30 pounds with diet and exercise and she said I could stop taking it. Well, I didn't stop and continued taking it. A couple months ago, I decided I would stop taking Metformin and see how everything would be. I soon developed a belly button yeast infection (gross!), I just felt...like crap. But my bloodsugar was normal the entire time. Maybe the belly button thing was a coincidence, who knows. When I stopped the Metformin, I would wake up to a n... ... Has anyone had severe stomach cramps stopping metformin cold turkey and blood after diahorrea does this go help pls ## Hello, Fluffy! How are you feeling? If you're having bloody diarrhea, you need to have that checked out by your doctor, as soon as possible. Why did you go off of the Metformin? What have you replaced it with? ## Glicerzide has that metformin in it all my blood test normal I think withdrawals cold turkey I keep going Dr will I get better headaches muscle pain vomitin diahorrea stomach pain tingly ears this withdrawals of cold turkey help ... Sir I'm an ocd patient and used to use fludac 60 mg once daily and nexito forte night . im also a diabetic patient using januvia 100 mg and metformin 500 mg twice a day. Suddenly 2 days back had vomitings and indigestion so stopped all medication. Feeling now very weak and cold chills shivering and sweating. Now my psychiatrist is suggesting to take nexito forte 2 tablets and he say Continue reading >>

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