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Can You Reverse Vision Loss From Diabetes?

Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Reversed?

Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Reversed?

Sindre, you are confronting something very difficult. I have had type 1 diabetes for over 40 years as well. My experience might be helpful. I learned to not assign the role of primary care giver to my doctors some 36 years ago when I came across an article in the Journal of Chronic Disease on the correlation of tight control and the side effects of diabetes. The article excited me because it showed me that there was something I could do about the problems of diabetes. However, it also infuriated me that my doctors had never told me about any such thing as a side effect. (We did have an animated discussion after that.) Then a few years later in the late 70s I was one of the participants in a study on the use of an insulin pump and in home blood testing. The pump was the size of a brick and I had to go to a saddle maker to have a holster made for it. In that small study one of the participants saw a dramatic reduction in his very advanced diabetic neuropathy. So good control is critical and that was the first I had known about the possibility of reversal of the “irreversable”. This tool gave me the power to do something about my condition to keep it from being a disease. So to this day I have no side effects of diabetes. My opthamologist told me a few years ago that he had never seen a diabetic beyond 10 years with no retinopathy. OK now for what this has to do with your father’s situation is this; I became my own primary care giver when I found that the doctors were going to prescribe a progression of drugs on top of the insulin without looking for any cure. No I do not expect the T1 diabetes to be reversed by diet but the disease portion of diabetes such as enhanced coronary artery disease, neuropathy, retinopathy, renal failure et al are preventable and reversibl Continue reading >>

Drug Reverses Diabetes-related Vision Loss

Drug Reverses Diabetes-related Vision Loss

April 28, 2010 -- Federal researchers say a new treatment can reverse vision loss in many patients with diabetic macular edema, a leading cause of blindness in people with diabetes. In a news conference yesterday, researchers announced findings from a government study comparing treatments for swelling of the retina caused by leaking blood vessels in the eye. Nearly 50% of patients given eye injections of the drug Lucentis along with laser treatments showed improvement in vision after a year of treatment, compared to just over a fourth of patients treated with laser alone. For several decades, laser has been the standard treatment for diabetic macular edema, or DME, in which fluid builds up near the center of the retina. “For the first time in 25 years we have definitive proof that a new treatment can lead to better results for the eye health of people with diabetes,” said Neil M. Bressler, MD, who oversaw the study as chairman of the Diabetic Retinopathy Clinical Research Network. Lucentis is a genetically engineered drug derived from the cancer drug Avastin, which was the first targeted biologic treatment approved by the FDA. The newer biologic was approved in June 2006 for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Bressler said the clear superiority of Lucentis with laser over laser alone in patients with diabetic macular edema should have an immediate impact on clinical practice, even though the biologic treatment is not approved for this indication. “We expect the results of this study to have a major impact on how ophthalmologists treat macular edema in people with diabetes,” he says. The study included 691 diabetic patients with macular edema in one or both eyes. The patients received either Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

Diabetes And Your Eyes — More Than Retinopathy

You probably know that eye damage (retinopathy) is a major complication of diabetes. So when vision blurs, it’s normal to think the worst. But diabetes can cause blurred vision in several other ways, some of which are reversible. I’m embarrassed to admit I only recently found out that blurred vision is a symptom of diabetes, even without any retinal damage. When blood glucose levels go up, blood gets thicker. Thicker blood pulls in more fluid from surrounding tissues, including the lenses of the eye, impacting the ability to focus. -- Keep an eye on your vision! Learn about preventive steps and treatments for diabetic retinopathy from retinal specialist Dr. Charles Wykoff. >> Blood sugar and blurry vision According to WebMD, [Blurred vision] could just be a temporary problem that develops rapidly and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. Changing the shape of the lens naturally throws off vision. This can be a chronic, 24/7 kind of problem, or it can occur only after a high-carb meal, when glucose is way up. The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide says that after-meal blurriness can be prevented by avoiding high-carb meals. The cure for chronic, all-the-time blurriness is to get blood glucose down to normal range before meals. It may take as long three months of relatively normal blood glucose levels before vision returns to your baseline normal. Diabetes can also cause blurriness or double vision due to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose). In this case, lens shape is probably not to blame. Low blood glucose can make it hard for the brain to focus on what the eye is seeing. Vision usually returns to normal when glucose levels rise. If blurriness doesn’t go away when glucos Continue reading >>

Can You Slow Or Reverse Vision Loss Due To Diabetes?

Can You Slow Or Reverse Vision Loss Due To Diabetes?

Can you slow or reverse vision loss due to diabetes? If you find and treat diabetic retinopathy early, you can slow or even reverse some forms of vision loss. If you have diabetes, you should see an eye doctor at least once a year. If your annual exams are normal, you may be able to have follow-up exams every 2-3 years. American Diabetes Association: "Eye Complications," "Eye Care." National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "Keep Your Eyes Healthy," "Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke." CDC: "2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet," "Take Charge of Your Diabetes," "Diabetes Health Concerns." National Diabetes Education Program: "Guiding Principles for Diabetes Care," "4 Steps To Control Your Diabetes. For Life." Reviewed by Michael Dansinger on February 13, 2017 American Diabetes Association: "Eye Complications," "Eye Care." National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse: "Keep Your Eyes Healthy," "Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke." CDC: "2011 National Diabetes Fact Sheet," "Take Charge of Your Diabetes," "Diabetes Health Concerns." National Diabetes Education Program: "Guiding Principles for Diabetes Care," "4 Steps To Control Your Diabetes. For Life." How can quitting smoking prevent diabetes-related eyesight complications? THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911. This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional in Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease comprises a group of eye conditions that affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. DME is a consequence of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the area of the retina called the macula. Controlling diabetes—by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet—can prevent or delay vision loss. Because diabetic retinopathy often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with several therapies, used alone or in combination. NEI supports research to develop new therapies for diabetic retinopathy, and to compare the effectiveness of existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Kens5.com | 'breakthrough' Drug Could Reverse Vision Loss Caused By Diabetes

Kens5.com | 'breakthrough' Drug Could Reverse Vision Loss Caused By Diabetes

'Breakthrough' drug could reverse vision loss caused by diabetes Diabetes is the number one cause of blindness in the U.S. Until recently there was no way to reverse it. But now, a fairly new drug recently approved by the FDA is changing that. Diabetes is reportedly the number one cause of blindness in the United States. Until recently, there was no way to reverse it. However, a fairly new drug recently approved by the FDA is changing that. "It was one of those things that's hard to believe," said Sonny Groves, a portrait photographer. He found out he had diabetes 20 years ago. "As the disease progressed, I had problems like neuropathy in the hands and feet, that sort of thing," Groves said. His vision also started to go. That's when he was referred to the Medical Center Ophthalmology Associates. "Better control of your blood sugar will give us better control of the back of your eye," said Dr. Michael Singer as he examined Groves' vision. Singer is the director of clinical trials at MCOA. "Dr. Singer was the first one to notice I had any problems because he noticed tiny bleeders in my retina," Groves said. "When tissues are deprived of oxygen, they scream for help. They send out a signal called VEGF," said Singer. The VEGF sends new blood vessels to help the tissues, but that's not a good thing. "Instead of being helpful, they are actually harmful. They cause swelling in the central part of your vision," Singer said. "This is the first time the FDA has approved a drug like this to reverse the disease," Singer said. The usage is for diabetic retinopathy in patients either with or without diabetic macular edema. This latest approval broadens the diabetic retinopathy indication to include patients both with and without diabetic macular edema. That disease is called diabet Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetic Retinopathy And Macular Edema

Treatment Of Diabetic Retinopathy And Macular Edema

On this page: Lasers for diabetic retinopathy treatment • Preparing for laser treatment • Non-laser treatment of diabetic macular edema • Vitrectomy and other treatments • Steroid eye drops Millions of Americans each year face vision loss related to diabetes. In fact, according to recent data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), nearly 26 million Americans — roughly 8.3 percent of the U.S. population — have diabetes, and more than 28 percent of diabetics age 40 or older in the U.S. have diabetic retinopathy (DR) and related diabetic eye disease. To make matters worse, a significant number of cases of diabetes and diabetic eye disease go undetected or untreated because people fail to have routine comprehensive eye exams as recommended by their optometrist or ophthalmologist. Most laser and non-laser treatments for diabetic eye disease depend on the severity of the eye changes and type of vision problems you have. Diabetic retinopathy is diabetes-related damage to the light-sensitive retina in the back of the eye. As diabetes progresses, chronic high blood sugar levels cause changes that damage the tiny blood vessels in the retina, which makes them leak fluid or hemorrhage (bleed). Eventually, this leads to vision problems that cannot be corrected with eyeglasses or contact lenses. [Enlarge] The appearance of diabetic retinopathy is associated with the proliferation of a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the retina. VEGF stimulates the production of new blood vessels in the retina to bring more oxygen to the tissue because retinal blood circulation is inadequate due to diabetes. Unfortunately, these tiny new blood vessels that form in the retina in response to VEGF are fragile and increase in number, leading Continue reading >>

Method May Reverse Vision Loss From Diabetes

Method May Reverse Vision Loss From Diabetes

Method may reverse vision loss from diabetes Posted by Rachel Butch-JHU January 3rd, 2018 You are free to share this article under the Attribution 4.0 International license. Researchers have found a potential way of stalling or even reversing diabetes-related blindness. In experiments with mice, scientists found a protein that triggers vision loss caused by diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, two diseases characterized by the closure of blood vessels in the retina. By suppressing levels in the eye of the protein called vascular endothelial growth factor, scientists were able to re-establish normal blood flow in the mice retinas. This work is particularly important because it helps explain why diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion continue to worsen across a patients lifetime if left untreated, says Peter Campochiaro, professor of ophthalmology at Johns Hopkins Universitys Wilmer Eye Institute. As reported in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight , researchers found that increased VEGF levels attract white blood cells into the retina. Once there, they adhere to the walls of blood vessels, disrupting blood flow. Reducing VEGF or blocking it with an antibody caused the white blood cells to dissipate, opening the closed vessels and restoring blood flow to the area. We all believed that this disease caused the blood vessels to die off and was, therefore, irreversible. The inspiration for the study came from observations in clinical trials for ranibizumab, a drug designed to block VEGF in patients with diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion. After VEGF was suppressed, blood flow improved to parts of the retina that were previously blocked. Patients conditions also improved. We all believed that this disease caused the blood vessels to Continue reading >>

Diabetic Blindness Could Be Reversed With Eye Injection

Diabetic Blindness Could Be Reversed With Eye Injection

Diabetic blindness could be reversed with eye injection The chemical, called AAQ, works by making normally 'blind' cells in the retina sensitive to light Injecting the drug ranibizumab into the eyes of diabetics improved their sight and prevented further deterioration Diabetics blinded by the disease have been offered new hope afters scientists unveiled the first new treatment in 40 years. Researchers said that injections of the drug ranibizumab improved sight when compared to traditional treatments for people with proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The disorder occurs when high blood sugar levels damage the cells at the back of the eye. If it isn't treated, it can cause blindness. PDR is a leading cause of vision loss in patients with diabetes and the standard treatment has been laser surgery which can result in loss of peripheral vision and difficult seeing at night. However the new treatment allowed patients to keep their peripheral vision while improving central sight so they could see eye charts more accurately and read half a line more, on average. "This important study represents a major step forward for patients with PDR by providing the ophthalmologists who manage their retinal disease with new options," said Dr Timothy Olsen, of Emory University, Atlanta. The injections would need to take place once a month for three months. The number of adults with diabetes has risen more than 65 per cent since 2005, with more people than ever at risk of blindness. Most diabetics will end of with some kind of eye problem because they have too much sugar in their blood Alamy Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people of working age in the UK. It is estimated that there are 4,200 people in England who are blind due to diabetic retinopathy. Within 20 years of Continue reading >>

Reversing Diabetic Blindness With Diet

Reversing Diabetic Blindness With Diet

Though many reported feeling better on Dr. Walter Kempner’s rice and fruit diet, he refused to accept such anecdotal evidence as proof of success. He wanted objective measurements. The most famous were his “eyegrounds photographs,” taken with a special camera that allowed one to visualize the back of the eye. In doing so, he proved diet can arrest the bleeding, oozing, and swelling you see in the back of the eye in people with severe kidney, hypertensive, or heart disease. Even more than that, he proved that diet could actually reverse it, something never thought possible. In my video, Can Diabetic Retinopathy Be Reversed?, you can see before and after images of the back of patients’ eyes. He found reversal to such a degree that even those who could no longer distinguish large objects were able to once again read fine print. Dr. Kempner had shown a reversal of blindness with diet. The results were so dramatic that the head of the department of ophthalmology at Duke, where Kempner worked, was questioned as to whether they were somehow faked. He assured them they were not. In fact, he wrote in one person’s chart, “This patient’s eyegrounds are improved to an unbelievable degree.” Not only had he never seen anything like it, he couldn’t remember ever seeing a patient with such advanced disease even being alive 15 months later. The magnitude of the improvements Kempner got—reversal of end-stage heart and kidney failure—was surprising, simply beyond belief. But as Kempner said as his closing sentence of a presentation before the American College of Physicians, “The important result is not that the change in the course of the disease has been achieved by the rice diet but that the course of the disease can be changed.” Now that we have high blood pre Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Diabetic Retinopathy: Q&a

Diabetes And Diabetic Retinopathy: Q&a

Q&A Menu To find the Q&As most helpful to you, please click on one of these subjects: How Does Diabetes Affect Eyes? Q: How does diabetes affect your eyes? — L.L., Connecticut A: Diabetes causes problems in the retina with what are collectively called microvascular abnormalities. The small blood vessels develop microaneurysms and leak blood. New blood vessel growth (neovascularization) occurs. Unfortunately, these blood vessels are weak and also leak. These leaks (hemorrhages) can cause irreversible damage to the retina and permanent vision loss. Patients with controlled diabetes do better than those with uncontrolled diabetes. However, even a person whose diabetes is under perfect control can still develop diabetic retinopathy — hence, the need for yearly retinal exams. — Dr. Slonim Q: Does diabetic retinopathy get progressively worse? — F.R. A: Yes. When left unrecognized and untreated, diabetic retinopathy can get worse and eventually lead to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can even get worse despite use of the best treatments that currently exist for it. — Dr. Slonim Q: My father has type 2 diabetes and he is seeing double. We went to the hospital about a week ago and they said the diabetes had affected a nerve on the right eye. Can medicine get his sight back to normal? — W.C. A: Diabetes can affect any one of the three cranial nerves that are responsible for movement of the eyes. Diabetes is one of the more common conditions associated with sixth nerve (Abducens nerve) palsies. Paralysis of this nerve affects the lateral rectus muscle that allows the eye to look outward. There is no specific medicine for this. The paralysis can be temporary and last a few months or it can be permanent. — Dr. Slonim Q: Can diabetes cause you to have eye infections suc Continue reading >>

Cnib - Q: I Have Diabetes. What Can I Do To Protect My Eyes? What Symptoms Should I Watch For? When Should I Worry?

Cnib - Q: I Have Diabetes. What Can I Do To Protect My Eyes? What Symptoms Should I Watch For? When Should I Worry?

Q: I have diabetes. What can I do to protect my eyes? What symptoms should I watch for? When should I worry? A:Understanding how diabetes affects the eye is the first step to protecting your eyes. Diabetes causes two major eye problems: early onset cataracts and diabetic retinal disease (retinopathy). Of these two problems, it is diabetic retinopathy that can lead to irreversible vision loss. All diabetics will eventually have some degree of retinopathy. Fortunately, not all patients with retinopathy will experience vision loss. We know from scientific studies that patients with very good diabetic control compared with 'average' control will have less overall retinopathy, slower progression, and less risk of vision loss. Control of high blood pressure and high lipid (fat) levels has also been shown to reduce the risk of vision loss in diabetics. Stopping smoking can also reduce the risk of vision loss. The most common symptoms of retinopathy are blurred or distorted vision. This is due to swelling in the centre of the retina (macula) associated with blood vessel damage. Laser surgical treatment and injections of various medications can help reduce the swelling, but usually are not able to fully reverse the loss of vision. A less common symptom is the appearance of large floaters or cobwebs in your sight. This can be due to bleeding in the clear space (vitreous) between the retina and lens. This is treated with laser surgery, and in some cases surgical removal of the blood and vitreous. To summarize, most diabetics should have an annual eye exam, including a dilated examination of the retina. They should strive for excellent diabetic control, keep the blood pressure and lipids at normal levels, and not smoke. This is the best advice to ensure that the eyes remain health Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy: Your Questions Answered

Diabetic Retinopathy: Your Questions Answered

Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication of diabetes and the leading cause of new-onset blindness in American adults. Effective treatments are available to preserve vision for eyes at risk of vision loss from diabetic retinopathy. The most opportune time for these treatments is before any vision has been lost, since even advanced diabetic retinopathy can be present when a person has no vision complaints or problems. What causes diabetic retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina, the thin, light-sensitive inner lining in the back of your eye. These changes are called diabetic retinopathy. How does diabetes damage the vessels in the retina? Elevated levels of blood glucose can damage the body in various ways, including harming the blood vessels in your eyes. Diabetes can affect the lining of the blood vessels in your eyes, causing them to thicken and develop leaks. Poor circulation in the retinal vessels can compound these problems by causing the production of fragile new vessels. What are the stages of retinopathy? Diabetic retinopathy is broadly classified as nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy. After 20 years of diabetes, most persons with diabetes will shows some signs of nonproliferative diabetic retinopathy, which is generally not sight-threatening itself unless macular edema is present. Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is a more serious stage of retinopathy and poses a greater risk of hemorrhage into the vitreous humor, the clear gel that fills the center of the eye, or detachment of the retina leading to severe vision loss. Diabetic macular edema can occur with either nonproliferative or proliferative diabetic retinopathy. There are various levels of nonproliferative diabetic re Continue reading >>

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

A A A Do I need to follow-up with my doctor after being diagnosed with diabetic eye disease? Diabetes is one of the leading causes of irreversible blindness worldwide, and, in the United States, it is the most common cause of blindness in people younger than 65 years of age. Diabetic eye disease also encompasses a wide range of other eye problems, for example, Diabetes may cause a reversible, temporary blurring of the vision, or it can cause a severe, permanent loss of vision. Some people may not even realize they have had diabetes for several years until they begin to experience problems with their eyes or vision. Diabetes also may result in heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, and circulatory abnormalities of the legs. The American Diabetes Association estimates that 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 8.1 million people additional people went undiagnosed. (This population is unaware that they have diabetes.) In the United States 1.2 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed every year. In the US in 2012, the total annual cost of diagnosed diabetes was 2.45 billion. Eighty-six million people in the US have prediabetes, and 9 out of every 10 don't know they have it. Of the 86 million people with prediabetes, without lifestyle changes 15% to 30% of them will develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years. Lifestyle management has been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by at least two-thirds. It can also slow or halt the progression of prediabetes to diabetes. People can try to avoid the problems associated with diabetes, including those that affect the eyes, by taking appropriate care of themselves by the following: Maintain a normal level of weight Watch your diet, especially limiting unhealthy types of fats and Continue reading >>

Vision Loss Reversed In People With Diabetic Eye Disease

Vision Loss Reversed In People With Diabetic Eye Disease

Ranibizumab, a prescription drug commonly used to treat age-related vision loss, also reverses vision loss caused by diabetes among Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites, according to a new study led by investigators from the USC Eye Institute. Diabetic retinopathy and diabetic macular edema are the leading causes of vision loss in working-age adults in the United States, according to the National Eye Institute. Laser surgery is the standard treatment for advanced stages of the disease, characterized by blurred vision, but previous research has shown that only 30 percent of patients saw improvement in their vision. “We found that ranibizumab can save the sight of thousands of working-age individuals suffering from diabetic eye disease, as standard treatments such as laser are not as effective,” said Rohit Varma, director of the USC Eye Institute, professor and chair of ophthalmology at the Keck School of Medicine of USC and the study’s lead author. Varma’s team developed a population-based model suggesting that administering 0.3 milligrams of ranibizumab every four weeks to patients with diabetic macular edema would reduce the number of cases of vision impairment by 45 percent, or 5,134 individuals, and the number of cases of legal blindness by 75 percent, or 1,275 individuals. The model was based on the approximately 37,000 Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adults with diabetic macular edema in the United States for whom ranibizumab treatment could be used. Because other race and ethnic groups were not included in the study, authors contend that the treatment may benefit even more people than their results show. Ranibizumab is manufactured and marketed by Genentech Inc. under the trade name Lucentis. The study, which was supported in part by Genentech Inc., appears in Continue reading >>

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