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Can You Reverse Kidney Damage Caused By Diabetes?

Treating Diabetic Kidney Disease

Treating Diabetic Kidney Disease

Because of the stress high blood sugar puts on blood vessels, diabetics have a strong likelihood of developing kidney disease. But maintaining control over your blood sugar can prevent this complication, which can become fatal if left untreated. In fact, controlling blood sugar can even reverse kidney problems for some diabetics. How is Kidney Disease Treated? The kidneys filter waste products out of the blood. Over time, diabetes can result in the kidneys filtering too much blood and eventually leaking protein into the urine, an early stage of kidney disease called microalbuminuria. When diagnosed early, kidney disease can be treated following many of the same steps involved in controlling your diabetes: • Eat a healthy diet comprised of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains and low-fat meats. • Take your insulin and other medications your doctor has prescribed. • Check your blood sugar levels regularly at home, and record the results. Talk to your doctor about how often to check your blood and what to do if your sugar levels start to get too high. You can take additional medications to help lower your blood pressure and treat kidney disease directly. Some options include: • Insulin or other medicines that lower blood sugar. • ACE inhibitors, such as Lopace (pamipril) or angiotensin II antagonist like Aprovel (irbesartan). These medicines are usually reserved for cases where a microalbuminuria has already been detected. • Blood pressure medicine if you suffer from high blood pressure. Diabetics with kidney disease should aim for a blood pressure level of 130/80 mm/hg or lower. • For end-stage kidney disease, you will need dialysis and, potentially, a kidney transplant. Reducing Kidney Damage Watching your diet and salt intake are essential to reducing Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Damage (nephropathy)

Diabetes And Kidney Damage (nephropathy)

Over time, high blood sugars can cause damage to the kidneys. This is called kidney disease, kidney damage or nephropathy. Your kidneys contain special filters that help clean your blood, remove waste, and control your fluid balance. These filters are called nephrons. Over time, high blood sugar can damage them and cause them to leak protein, called albumin, into your urine. You may experience no symptoms if the damage is minor. However, the extra protein (albumin) can show up on routine blood work conducted by your doctor. Untreated, damage to your kidneys can grow until kidney dialysis or a kidney transplant are necessary. Long-term studies show that achieving your HbA1c targets dramatically lowers your risk for kidney disease.1 The National Institute of Health’s (NIH) Medline Plus center states that kidney damage is more likely to occur if you: Have uncontrolled blood sugar Have high blood pressure Have type 1 diabetes that began before you were 20 years old Have family members who also have diabetes and kidney problems Smoke Are African American, Mexican American, or Native American See your healthcare provider yearly to get tested for any early signs of kidney damage or signs that there could soon be damage to the kidneys. There are different tests available that your healthcare provider should use. Urine albumin test (microalbuminuria): This involves a urine sample which is tested for the presence of a protein called albumin which may leak into the urine from the kidneys. This may indicate the presence of kidney damage. Blood urea nitrogen test (BUN): This involves a sample of blood from a vein and checks kidney function. Serum creatinine: This can be done by urine or blood sample and measures creatinine which should normally be removed by your kidneys so testin Continue reading >>

High Fat Diet May Be Able To Reverse Kidney Failure

High Fat Diet May Be Able To Reverse Kidney Failure

Scientists, in experiments with mice, have demonstrated for the first time that a special high-fat, low-carbohydrate diet called the ketogenic diet can reverse kidney failure caused by type 1 or type 2 diabetes. See also: A new exercise prescription for diabetes. If the findings can be replicated in humans, the diet would have profound implications for personal health and for the nation's health care, says neuroscientist Charles Mobbs of Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. "This is the first study to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes," says Mobbs, senior author of a paper published online in PLoS One on April 20. The mice, bred to develop type 1 or type 2 diabetes, were allowed to develop kidney failure, known as diabetic nephropathy. Then half were fed a standard high-carbohydrate diet while the other half ate a high-fat ketogenic diet, typically used to control epilepsy in children. After eight weeks, kidney failure was reversed in the mice on the ketogenic diet. Their blood glucose returned to normal and the presence of the protein albumin in urine, a strong predictor of the progression of kidney disease, also was corrected. Controlling blood glucose and blood pressure slows the progression of diabetic kidney disease, but once the kidneys are damaged there currently is no way to repair them. If they fail, dialysis or a kidney transplant is the only option, experts say, which means that reversing the disease would be far more valuable than simply delaying it. "I believe that glucose metabolism in the cells drives diabetic complications," says Mobbs. "But controlling blood glucose levels alone doesn't correct the complications. We had to go beyond simply correcting blood glucose." In monitoring the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy - Treatment Overview

Diabetic Nephropathy - Treatment Overview

Diabetic nephropathy is treated with medicines that lower blood pressure and protect the kidneys. These medicines may slow down kidney damage and are started as soon as any amount of protein is found in the urine. The use of these medicines before nephropathy occurs may also help prevent nephropathy in people who have normal blood pressure. If you have high blood pressure, two or more medicines may be needed to lower your blood pressure enough to protect the kidneys. Medicines are added one at a time as needed. If you take other medicines, avoid ones that damage or stress the kidneys, especially nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs include ibuprofen and naproxen. It is also important to keep your blood sugar within your target range. Maintaining blood sugar levels within your target range prevents damage to the small blood vessels in the kidneys. Limiting the amount of salt in your diet can help keep your high blood pressure from getting worse. You may also want to restrict the amount of protein in your diet. If diabetes has affected your kidneys, limiting how much protein you eat may help you preserve kidney function. Talk to your doctor or dietitian about how much protein is best for you. Initial treatment Medicines that are used to treat diabetic nephropathy are also used to control blood pressure. If you have a very small amount of protein in your urine, these medicines may reverse the kidney damage. Medicines used for initial treatment of diabetic nephropathy include: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, such as captopril, enalapril, lisinopril, and ramipril. ACE inhibitors can lower the amount of protein being lost in the urine. Also, they may reduce your risk of heart and blood vessel (cardiovascular) disease. If you also have high blo Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Tests And Treatments

Kidney Disease Tests And Treatments

The vast majority of people with kidney disease don't know it. That's because it damages the organs slowly over many years before causing symptoms. And left untreated, the condition can eventually require people to spend hours hooked up to a dialysis machine or get a kidney transplant. Even mild kidney problems can contribute to anemia, bone loss, worsened heart disease, and premature death. All that is particularly worrisome now because several factors have conspired to make kidney disease more common than ever. One is the increasing number of people who take multiple medications, which travel through the kidney as they leave the body, taxing the organ. Another is the growing, and related, epidemic of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, both of which further strain the kidneys. People over age 60 are especially vulnerable both because they tend to take more drugs, and because kidney function normally declines somewhat with age. Protecting the body's filters Fortunately, there are several steps you can take to ward off or rein in kidney damage. And you might be able to spot some early warning signs of kidney problems by watching for changes in your urinary habits or your urine's appearance (see the accompanying chart, How to read your urine). More important, improved—but underused—tests can now help diagnose the problem early, when it's most treatable. Your blood passes through a labyrinth of tiny filters in the kidneys that separate substances that the body needs, such as calcium, sodium, and water, from wastes created by the breakdown of food and drugs. The kidneys maintain a balance of the useful substances and eliminate the waste and excess fluid as urine. Diabetes and high blood pressure can overload the kidneys' precision workings, causing irreversible sc Continue reading >>

When Diagnosed Early, Stopping Diabetic Kidney Disease May Be Possible

When Diagnosed Early, Stopping Diabetic Kidney Disease May Be Possible

When Diagnosed Early, Stopping Diabetic Kidney Disease May Be Possible July 12, 2013 Dear Mayo Clinic: My father was recently diagnosed with diabetic kidney disease. Is there a chance this can be reversed, or will he have it for life? What changes, if any, should he be making to his diet? Answer: It is not uncommon for people who have diabetes to develop kidney problems. When diagnosed early, it may be possible to stop diabetic kidney disease and fix the damage. If the disease continues, however, the damage may not be reversible. Diabetic kidney disease, also called diabetic nephropathy, happens when diabetes damages blood vessels and other cells in the kidneys. This makes it hard for them to work as they should. In the early stages, diabetic kidney disease has no symptoms. That's why it is so important for people with diabetes to regularly have tests that check kidney function. In later stages of the disease, as kidney damage gets worse, signs and symptoms do appear. They may include ankle swelling, test findings that show protein in the urine, and high blood pressure. Over time, diabetic kidney disease can lead to end-stage kidney disease. If your father is in the early stages of diabetic kidney disease, there are several steps he can take to help protect his kidneys. First, it is critical to keep blood sugar as well controlled as possible. This not only helps the kidneys, but decreases the risk of other serious problems that can come from diabetes, such as blindness, heart attack and damage to the blood vessels and nerves. Keeping blood pressure under control also is important. High blood pressure can speed up the process of diabetic kidney disease and make kidney damage worse. In general, blood pressure of 140/90 in the doctor's office and 135/85 at home is a good g Continue reading >>

Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic Kidney Disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are not working as well as they once did. Various conditions can cause CKD. Severity can vary but most cases are mild or moderate, occur in older people, do not cause symptoms and tend to become worse gradually over months or years. People with any stage of CKD have an increased risk of developing heart disease or a stroke. This is why it is important to detect even mild CKD. Treatment may not only slow down the progression of the disease, but also reduce the risk of developing heart disease or stroke. What is chronic kidney disease? Chronic kidney disease (CKD) means that your kidneys are diseased or damaged in some way, or are ageing. As a result, your kidneys may not work as well as they used to. So, the various functions of the kidney, as described in the previous section, can be affected. A whole range of conditions can cause CKD (see later). See separate leaflet called The Kidneys and Urinary Tract. Chronic means ongoing, persistent and long-term. It does not mean severe as some people think. You can have a mild chronic disease. Many people have mild CKD. CKD used to be called chronic renal failure but CKD is a better term, as the word failure implies that the kidneys have totally stopped working. In most cases of CKD this is not so. In most people who have CKD there is only a mild or moderate reduction in kidney function, which usually does not cause symptoms, and the kidneys have not 'failed'. What is kidney failure? Kidney failure means that your kidneys can't work properly. The two main forms are: Chronic kidney disease. Acute kidney injury (AKI) - this used to be called acute renal failure. It means that the function of the kidneys is rapidly affected - over hours or days. For example, the kidneys may go in Continue reading >>

Diabetic Nephropathy - Kidney Disease

Diabetic Nephropathy - Kidney Disease

Tweet Kidney disease amongst diabetics is commonly called diabetic nephropathy. Statistically, around 40% of people with diabetes develop nephropathy but it is possible to prevent or delay through control of both blood glucose and blood pressure levels. Diabetes affects the arteries of the body and as the kidneys filter blood from many arteries, kidney problems are a particular risk for people with diabetes. What is diabetic nephropathy? Nephropathy is a general term for the deterioration of proper functioning in the kidneys. At an advanced level, this is called end-stage renal disease or ESRD. ESRD often stems from diabetes, with diabetes causing just under half of all cases. Diabetic nephropathy can affect people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Diabetic nephropathy is divided into five stages of deterioration, with the final one being ESRD. It commonly takes over 20 years for patients to reach stage 5. Symptoms of kidney disease The symptoms of diabetic nephropathy tend to become apparent once the condition has reached the later stages. Typically the following symptoms may start to be noticed around stage four of its progression: Swelling of the ankles, feet, lower legs or hands caused by retention of water Darker urine, caused by blood in the urine Becoming short of breath, when climbing the stairs for instance Tiredness as a result of a lack of oxygen in the blood Nausea or vomiting To help catch nephropathy before the later stages develop, people with diabetes should be screened for kidney complications once a year. The screening test involves a simple urine sample which is tested to detect whether protein is present in the urine. Read more on kidney disease screening What are the causes of diabetic nephropathy? Statistics show that development of kidney dise Continue reading >>

Bring In The Research Supporting The Blood Sugars You Want To Achieve Will Work.

Bring In The Research Supporting The Blood Sugars You Want To Achieve Will Work.

One of the worst things high blood sugars do to your body is that they slowly destroy your kidneys. Unfortunately, as is the case with so many "diabetic" complications, this organ destruction also appears to begin long before many people are given a diabetes diagnosis. The landmark UKPDS study found that one out of eight people diagnosed with diabetes already were leaking small amounts of protein into their urine. This symptom, called "microalbuminuria." is an early sign that kidneys have been damaged. Though there is no total agreement as to why this occurs, some factors that promote kidney damage are: 1. High blood pressure. When blood pressure is high, large protein molecules, including those that are glycosylated (covered with sticky excess sugar molecules) are pushed through the pores of the kidney's filtration units, damaging them. 2. High blood sugar. When normal glucose regulation fails, the kidneys must remove excess glucose from the blood, leading to high concentrations of glucose in the kidneys. These glucose molecules clog up tiny capillaries in the kidneys as they do those elsewhere in the body. Eventually this clogging destroys the glomeruli, the filtration units of the kidney. An eleven year study of over 1800 people with diabetes found a straight line relationship between the risk of developing chronic kidney disease and the A1c. The risk began to increase significantly when the A1c rose over 6.0%. Poor Glycemic Control in Diabetes and the Risk of Incident Chronic Kidney Disease Even in the Absence of Albuminuria and Retinopathy: Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Lori D. Bash et al. Arch Intern Med. Vol. 168 No. 22, Dec 8/22, 2008 Another study, that followed people with Type 1 diabetes for more than a decade found that those who had achi Continue reading >>

High Blood Pressure And Diabetic Kidney Disease

High Blood Pressure And Diabetic Kidney Disease

High blood pressure (hypertension) is one of the principal causes of diabetic kidney disease and kidney failure. When blood pressure is high, there is a large amount of tension inside the blood vessels that leads to damage. These vessels may close off completely which can cause a heart attack, stroke, or kidney failure. High blood sugar and high cholesterol can also damage blood vessels. Thus people with diabetes who also have hypertension are at especially high risk for blood vessel damage. It usually takes years for blood vessels to completely close off and damage to blood vessels can be slowed down or reversed with treatment. Diagnosis Diagnosis of high blood pressure can only be done by having your blood pressure measured by a person trained in taking blood pressures. Usually, there are no symptoms that can tell you that you have high blood pressure. In diabetic patients the blood pressure is considered high if it is greater than 130/80. Your blood pressure should be measured on multiple occasions as blood pressures vary normally throughout the day and it is normal to have occasional high pressures. Blood pressure should be taken after you have rested for 5 minutes and may be taken sitting or standing. Your healthcare providers may ask you to check your blood pressure at home and record the readings as part of your blood pressure management. Treatment There are multiple ways to control your blood pressure. The first step is lifestyle changes. Most patients will also need one or several medications to achieve good blood pressure control. Lifestyle Changes Your diet and lifestyle can directly affect blood pressure. For example, too much salt, alcohol, or caffeine intake leads to your body increase your blood pressure. Your weight also affects your blood pressure. Incr Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic Neuropathy Be Reversed?

Can Diabetic Neuropathy Be Reversed?

Diabetic neuropathy refers to nerve damage caused by diabetes. Neuropathy is a common condition impacting 60 to 70 percent of adults with diabetes. However, it mainly concerns those with uncontrolled blood sugar levels or those who have had diabetes for more than 25 years. The nerve damage caused by diabetic neuropathy is irreversible but there are ways to lessen symptoms and prevent further harm. Contents of this article: What is diabetic neuropathy? Diabetic neuropathy is a family of progressive nerve disorders related to type 1 and 2 diabetes. Although research is still taking place on this type of nerve damage, doctors think that blood sugars may damage nerve cells by impairing nerve fibers and reducing or confusing signaling. However, nerve damage is likely to be caused by a combination of factors, such as how the immune system functions, genetics, smoking, or alcohol use. Neuropathy can cause a range of symptoms, including pain, loss of sensation, numbness, tingling, and muscle weakness. Although neuropathy can occur wherever there are nerves, it tends to affect the legs and feet. Those with diabetic neuropathy tend to: have poor blood sugar control be over the age of 40 be overweight or obese have had diabetes for at least 10 to 25 years, depending on the severity Types Diabetic neuropathy is typically divided into four categories depending on which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Nerve damage that impacts the ability of the peripheral nerves to sense things, such as temperature and touch. Peripheral neuropathy most commonly affects the arms, hands, legs, feet, and toes, often causing pain or loss of feeling. It is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Proximal neuropathy Nerve damage resulting in pain in the hips, thighs, pelvis, and buttocks. Continue reading >>

Diabetes&its Link To Kidney Disease

Diabetes&its Link To Kidney Disease

Online Health Chat with Dr. Betul Hatipoglu and Dr. George Thomas Introduction Cleveland_Clinic_Host: Research shows that diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease. In honor of World Kidney Day on March 10, 2011, the Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute and the Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute invite you to an online chat about diabetes and its link to kidney function. Join endocrinologist Betul Hatipoglu, MD, and nephrologist George Thomas, MD, online for answers to your questions concerning diabetes and kidney disease. Both Cleveland Clinic’s Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute and Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute are ranked in the top 10 nationally by U.S. News & World Report. Dr. Betul Hatipoglu is a staff member in the Department of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism at Cleveland Clinic's main campus, having accepted that appointment in 2008. Prior to that appointment, she was an assistant professor of medicine and medical director for the pancreas and islet cell transplant program at the University of Illinois at Chicago for nearly eight years. Her clinical interests include diabetes, thyroid disease in woman, pituitary and adrenal disorders, and alternative medicine. Dr. Hatipoglu received her medical degree from Istanbul Medical School. She completed an internal medicine residency and chief residency at Michael Reese-University of Illinois at Chicago, and an endocrinology fellowship at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Hatipoglu speaks three languages -- English, Turkish and French -- and is board-certified in internal medicine, as well as endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism. Dr. George Thomasis a staff member in the Department of Nephrology and Hypertension of the Glickman Urological & Kidney Institute at Cleveland Clinic. H Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Diabetic Kidney Failure May Be Reversed With Low-carbohydrate Diet

Researchers have found that by administering a low-carb, high-fat diet in mice, that diabetic kidney damage was reversed, and also uncovered an array of genes associated with kidney failure. Researchers from Mount Sinai School of Medicine have for the first time determined that the ketogenic diet, a specialized high-fat, low carbohydrate diet, may reverse impaired kidney function in Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. They also identified a previously unreported panel of genes associated with diabetes-related kidney damage, whose changes in expression were reversed by the diet. The findings were published online in the peer-reviewed journal PLoS ONE. Charles Mobbs, PhD, Professor of Neuroscience and Geriatrics and Palliative Care Medicine at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, and his research team evaluated mice that were genetically predisposed to have Type 1 or 2 diabetes. The mice were allowed to develop diabetic nephropathy, or kidney damage. Half of the mice were put on the ketogenic diet, while the control group maintained a standard high carbohydrate diet. The researchers found that after eight weeks, molecular and functional indicators of kidney damage were reversed in the mice on the ketogenic diet. Microscopic analysis showed that kidney pathology in the model of Type 2 diabetes was partially reversed. "Our study is the first to show that a dietary intervention alone is enough to reverse this serious complication of diabetes," said Dr. Mobbs. "This finding has significant implications for the tens of thousands of Americans diagnosed with diabetic kidney failure, and possibly other complications, each year." The ketogenic diet is a low-carbohydrate, moderate protein, and high-fat diet typically used to control seizures in children with epilepsy. Many cells can get their e Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease: Stages And Reversal

Kidney Disease: Stages And Reversal

From STOP the Rollercoaster Copyright © 1996 by Diabetes Services, Inc. Research on kidney disease has also been promising. Kidney disease is the most devastating complication of diabetes. Measurable kidney damage is found in 43 percent of Type 1 diabetics who have had their disease longer than five years and in 25 percent of those with Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. One out of every 100 people with diabetes at any time is in kidney failure (dialysis or transplant). Stages Of Kidney Disease Kidney damage goes through stages that can be monitored with standard lab tests: Microalbuminuria occurs when trace amounts of a protein called albumin begin to leak through the damaged filtering structures of the kidneys. The presence of microalbumin in the urine is often an early warning of kidney disease, but can also be present for other reasons. Normal values on this test are less than 15 to 30 mg/l. The important microalbumin test should be done at least yearly in those who have had diabetes for five years or longer. The test will help those who have had diabetes a relatively short time but have already started to spill microalbumin. As kidney damage progresses, microalbumin spillage will rise above 200 mg/l and be followed by: Proteinuria is the spillage of larger quantities of protein. A standard urinalysis will pick up this spillage (normal is less than 100-150 mg/day, depending on the lab). As damage progresses and protein levels reach about 2000-4000 mg/day, proteinuria is followed by: A rising blood creatinine. Creatinine is a normal breakdown product from muscle which the kidneys cleanse from blood (a normal creatinine is 1.1-1.3 mg/dl or less, depending on the lab). As damaged kidneys have more tr Continue reading >>

Nephropathy | Kidney Disease | Natural Treatments

Nephropathy | Kidney Disease | Natural Treatments

Every day, your kidneys filter about 120 to 150 quarts of blood to produce about 1 to 2 quarts of urine, composed of wastes and extra fluid. Each kidney is made up of about a million filtering units called nephrons. Each nephron filters a small amount of blood. The nephron includes a filter, called the glomerulus, and a tubule. The nephrons work through a two-step process. The glomerulus lets fluid and waste products pass through it; however, it prevents blood cells and large molecules, mostly proteins, from passing. The filtered fluid then passes through the tubule, which sends needed minerals back to the bloodstream and removes wastes. The final product becomes urine, which drains down into collecting ducts to the ureter. Diabetic nephropathy occurs when proper blood glucose levels are not maintained, leading to excess inflammation and glucose in the bloodstream, clogging the small capillaries that feed into the kidneys. In addition, there is an excess amount of acid waste in the blood that further clogs these small capillaries. The accumulation of calcium (due to the extra insulin) and acid waste in the kidneys causes the formation of kidney stones and ultimately causes kidney cells to die. Because kidney cells cannot be regenerated or repaired, the remaining cells have to work that much harder to filter substances from the blood. To help with the filtering process, the heart increases the flow of blood plasma to the kidneys, which in turn elevates blood pressure. As the kidney cells continue to die, the risk of kidney failure increases dramatically. This eventually leads to one or both of the kidneys losing their ability to function properly, characterized by high protein levels in the urine (proteinuria). Alcohol, tobacco, conventional animal meat, and many of the Continue reading >>

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