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Can You Remove A Portion Of The Pancreas?

Surgery To Try To Cure

Surgery To Try To Cure

The type of operation you needdepends on where the cancer is in the pancreas. For cancers of the head of the pancreas,you might have either an operationto removethe head of the pancreas (PPPD) or a Whipple's operation. For cancers in the body or tail of your pancreas you will have a distal pancreatectomy. These are major operations. Because you keep part of your pancreas, you might not need to takeinsulin. You may not need to takeenzymesto help you digest food (although around 1 in 3 Whipple's patients do need enzymes). Your doctor will monitor your digestion and blood sugar to make sure you can manage on your own. You will need support with your eating and drinking after these types of surgery. It might take time to return to a normal diet. Taking out the head of the pancreas (PPPD) Taking out the head of the pancreas is called pylorus preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD). your duodenum (the first part of your small bowel) your gallbladder and part of your bile duct The diagram below shows what your surgeon removes. After the surgery, the tail of the pancreas is joined to a bit of your small bowel. This diagram shows how the surgeon might repair what is left behind. This operation is the same as a PPPD but you also have part of your stomach removed. This diagram shows what your surgeon removes. This diagram shows how the surgeon might repair what is left behind. Removing the pancreas (total pancreatectomy) This operation is not done very often in the UK. It is very major surgery. the gallbladder and part of your bile duct This diagram shows you what the surgeon takes away. This diagram shows you how the surgeon repairs what is left behind. Youmust be fit enough forsuch major surgery, this is so youcancope with thelong general anaesthetic and get over the operatio Continue reading >>

What Foods To Avoid After Pancreatic Removal

What Foods To Avoid After Pancreatic Removal

What Foods to Avoid After Pancreatic Removal Erica Wickham covers health, exercise and lifestyle topics for various websites. She completed an internship in dietetics and earned a Master of Science in dietetics from DYouville College in Buffalo, N.Y. Wickham now serves as a registered dietitian. Avoid raw vegetables.Photo Credit: VeselovaElena/iStock/Getty Images The pancreas is a gland that lies deep within the abdomen. It plays an integral part in the digestive system; combining enzymes with the digestive juices from the intestines to complete the breakdown of carbohydrates, protein and fat. The pancreas is also responsible for secreting hormones that regulate blood glucose levels. The pancreas typically goes unnoticed until problems occur. Removal of the pancreas is a serious surgical procedure that changes the composition of the entire digestive system. A special diet that eliminates certain foods is required to avoid adverse health complications. Fruits and vegetables provide your body with essential vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that it needs to develop, heal and maintain health. While you should eat several servings of fruits and vegetables each day, you should avoid eating them raw. Choose vegetables that are well-cooked or steamed and fruits that are stewed or canned. Carrots, zucchini, squash, well-ripened melon, applesauce and soft bananas are good choices. Fresh produce is more difficult to digest, and because of its higher fiber content can cause diarrhea after your pancreas is removed. Avoid tough vegetables, legumes and fruits with skins or seeds such as apples, pears, berries and citrus fruits other than pulp-free juices. Following the removal of your pancreas, it is important to consume foods that are easily digested. Therefore, you should avoid Continue reading >>

Chronic Pancreatitis Treatments

Chronic Pancreatitis Treatments

Treatment of chronic pancreatitis depends on the cause of the disease, severity of the associated pain and effectiveness of former treatment approaches. The first step of treatment focuses on relieving pain and eating a diet that is high in carbohydrates and low in fat. It is essential to stop drinking alcohol entirely. Your doctor may prescribe pancreatic enzymes to take with meals if your pancreas does not secrete enough of its own enzymes. The supplemental enzymes should be taken with every meal to help your body digest food and regain some weight. If you have diabetes, insulin and other drugs may be needed to control blood sugar levels. There are a number of surgical procedures available for patients whose pain is not relieved by medications or other approaches. Surgery may involve removing stones from the pancreas, draining blocked ducts, or partial or entire removal of the pancreas. A partial pancreatectomy involves removing part of the pancreas, such as the body or tail, during a Puestow or Whipple procedure. A total pancreatectomy involves removing the entire pancreas. While a total pancreatectomy is usually effective in relieving pain in patients when all other treatments fail, it induces permanent diabetes, requiring patients to take insulin shots or use an insulin pump for the rest of their lives. This is because the pancreas contains Islets of Langerhans also known as islets or islet cells that regulate the body's blood sugar levels. UCSF's Islet and Cellular Transplantation Center is one the few medical centers in the country to offer a total pancreatectomy performed with an islet autotransplant. This innovative dual procedure helps alleviate pain caused by pancreatitis, while preserving the ability to secrete insulin and reducing the risk of developing su Continue reading >>

Tuesday Q And A: Removing Pancreas Is Rarely A Means Of Preventing Cancer

Tuesday Q And A: Removing Pancreas Is Rarely A Means Of Preventing Cancer

Tuesday Q and A: Removing pancreas is rarely a means of preventing cancer DEAR MAYO CLINIC: Is preventative surgery an option for people with a strong genetic predisposition to pancreatic cancer? If not, are there any screening tests that can catch it early? ANSWER: Although removing the pancreas is a possibility for people who have a strong family history of pancreatic cancer , it is used only rarely as a means of preventing the disease. Thats because there are significant health risks associated with not having a pancreas. No formal screening methods are in place for this type of cancer. But certain imaging exams may be able to detect pancreatic cancer in its early stages. Your pancreas is located in your abdomen, behind the lower part of your stomach. One of its main jobs is to make insulin, a hormone that regulates the transfer of sugar, or glucose, from your bloodstream into your cells. The pancreas also makes enzymes that aid in your bodys digestion. Pancreatic cancer starts in the tissue of the pancreas. In its early stages, it seldom causes signs or symptoms. This cancer often spreads quickly and is difficult to successfully treat. In general, pancreatic cancer is not common. If you have a family history of the disease, though, your risk of developing pancreatic cancer can be two to three times higher than normal. Given the increased risk and the poor outlook for those diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, it is reasonable for people who have multiple relatives with the disease to seriously consider their options for reducing the risk of pancreatic cancer or for catching it in its early stages. Removing the pancreas may seem like a straightforward way to prevent cancer. But that procedure is associated with a number of serious long-term side effects. People who do Continue reading >>

What To Expect After An Operation

What To Expect After An Operation

Pancreatic Cancer Diagnosis, Prevention, and Treatment As with all major operations, recovering from pancreatic surgery takes time. Full recovery requires an average of two months. Your recovery can be divided into different stages, each of which carry a different set of expectations. However, it is important to remember that every patient's recovery is different, even patients undergoing the exact same procedure. Patients spend an average of 3-10 days in the hospital after pancreas surgery. While you are in the hospital, many members of your health care team will be checking in on you daily. Your in-house team consists of residents, medical students, nurses, and your surgeon. Your team will closely monitor your progress throughout your stay. You will be seen by residents and nurses several times each day and by your surgeon and/or one of our Pancreas Center surgeons at least once each day. It is normal to experience pain after pancreas surgery. While in the hospital, you will be able to manage your pain with intravenous pain medication. Once you are at home, you will manage your pain with oral medications prescribed by your health care team. After your operation, you will have staples and special dressings where incisions were made during your procedure. You may also have some surgical drainage tubes left in your abdomen. Your team will check your dressings regularly to ensure they are healing well and monitor any tubes to ensure proper drainage. It is normal to be discharged home with the surgical drainage tubes still in place, so do not be worried about your recovery if this happens to you. You will be given specific instructions on how to care for both the drainage tubes and your surgical dressing before you are discharged from the hospital; both will be removed du Continue reading >>

Pancreatectomy - Procedure, Recovery, Blood, Tube, Removal, Pain, Complications, Infection

Pancreatectomy - Procedure, Recovery, Blood, Tube, Removal, Pain, Complications, Infection

A pancreatectomy is the surgical removal of the pancreas. A pancreatectomy may be total, in which case the entire organ is removed, usually along with the spleen, gallbladder, common bile duct, and portions of the small intestine and stomach. A pancreatectomy may also be distal, meaning that only the body and tail of the pancreas are removed, leaving the head of the organ attached. When the duodenum is removed along with all or part of the pancreas, the procedure is called a pancreaticoduodenectomy, which surgeons sometimes refer to as "Whipple's procedure." Pancreaticoduodenectomies are increasingly used to treat a variety of malignant and benign diseases of the pancreas. This procedure often involves removal of the regional lymph nodes as well. A pancreatectomy is the most effective treatment for cancer of the pancreas, an abdominal organ that secretes digestive enzymes, insulin, and other hormones. The thickest part of the pancreas near the duodenum (a part of the small intestine) is called the head, the middle part is called the body, and the thinnest part adjacent to the spleen is called the tail. While surgical removal of tumors in the pancreas is the preferred treatment, it is only possible in the 1015% of patients who are diagnosed early enough for a potential cure. Patients who are considered suitable for surgery usually have small tumors in the head of the pancreas (close to the duodenum, or first part of the small intestine), have jaundice as their initial symptom, and have no evidence of metastatic disease (spread of cancer to other sites). The stage of the cancer will determine whether the pancreatectomy to be performed should be total or distal. A partial pancreatectomy may be indicated when the pancreas has been severely injured by trauma, especially inj Continue reading >>

Woman's Radical Procedure Transforms Liver Into Super Organ

Woman's Radical Procedure Transforms Liver Into Super Organ

Food started to bother Allison Sarver when she was 18 years old, giving her attacks of nausea and pain after meals. By the time she was 24, she would sneak out of her office after lunch to lie down in her car until the attacks passed. By the end of that year, she was no longer able to eat or drink anything and had to rely on intravenous feeding to survive. After years of alternately ignoring the symptoms and getting misdiagnosed with ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, a doctor in Philadelphia finally told Sarver she had chronic pancreatitis, meaning her pancreas -- the organ that produces insulin and other enzymes necessary for digestion -- had become scarred and enflamed. Unable to eat without pain, Sarver lost 30 pounds in two months and was found to be deficient in vitamins A, B, D and E. While grateful for a diagnosis, getting treatment for her pancreatitis remained another matter. "I was told, 'If we can't help you, no one else can help you,'" she said, referring to her team of doctors. "I thought, 'There has to be a place that does [treats] this.'" An Internet search led Sarver to the pancreas clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, which specialized in pancreatitis. They had been performing a surgery on some of their patients that involved removing the entire pancreas, extracting its insulin-producing cells -- called islets -- and moving them to the patient's liver. The liver would then take over the job of producing insulin to regulate blood glucose levels, and the patient would take enzyme pills to fulfill the pancreas's remaining jobs, which include aiding in the digestion of fats, carbohydrates and protein. In April 2012, when Sarver first started seeing the Hopkins doctors, she couldn't imagine having her entire pancreas removed. It was just t Continue reading >>

Living Without A Pancreas: Is It Possible?

Living Without A Pancreas: Is It Possible?

Living without a pancreas: Is it possible? Adjusting to life without a pancreas can seem daunting at first, but most patients adjust remarkably well. Located deep in the abdomen, the pancreas is a vital part of the digestive system and a critical controller of blood sugar levels, releasing the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream to help control how the body uses food for energy. Given the importance of the pancreas as an organ, you might think living without one is impossible like trying to live without a heart. But you can in fact live without a pancreas. Thanks to advancements in Medicine and the technology with which to administer it, we can now more effectively than ever reproduce what the pancreas does when it becomes necessary to remove all or part of the organ because of pancreatic cancer or other pancreatic diseases . Partial pancreatectomy, or only removing part of the pancreas, is much more common than a total pancreatectomy, or removing the entire pancreas. Total pancreatectomy is most commonly performed for patients who have a so called field-defect that places their entire gland at risk for developing cancer. This occurs rarely, but some genetic conditions or pre-cancerous lesions can require such an operation. Thus it is important for at-risk patients to know their options and ask their physician if they qualify for either a partial or total pancreatectomy. So how do you live without a pancreas or only a partial one? The short answer is medications, lifestyle changes, and in rare cases, transplantation of the hormone-producing pancreatic cells. In addition to regulating blood sugar levels, the pancreas secretes powerful enzymes into the intestines to help break down fatty foods so our bodies can use the nutrients. For the most part, we can Continue reading >>

Surgery Treatment For Acute Pancreatitis

Surgery Treatment For Acute Pancreatitis

(iii) surgical treatment (iv) laparoscopic treatment Severe pancreatitis causes death of parts of the pancreas. The injured and dying pancreas releases digestive enzymes in the pancreas, which causes extensive death of fatty tissue in the abdomen. As a consequence patients with severe pancreatitis have dead pancreatic tissue and also widespread death of fatty tissue around the pancreas. This dead pancreas tissue is called pancreatic necrosis and the dead fatty around the pancreas is called peripancreatic necrosis. In patients with severe pancreatitis, careful observation leads to improvement without an operation in about 60 to 70 percent of people. Thirty percent of patients will develop either progressive deterioration or infection in their necrosis and require surgery . The necrotic tissue is susceptible to infection and infections are very common in patients with severe pancreatitis. When the dead pancreas is not infected, it is called sterile necrosis. When the dead pancreas is infected then it is called infected necrosis. More than 80% of deaths amongst patients with acute pancreatitis are caused by infection of the dead pancreatic tissue.The treatment of sterile and infected necrosis is complex and the patient may benefit from treatment in a specialty center that treat a high volume of these conditions. Patients with sterile necrosis have dead pancreatic tissue, however there is no infection of the dead tissue. The recommended treatment for this group of patients is close observation in the hospital. Patients are placed on intravenous feeding and undergo serial examination with CT scans for early detection of infection. We would consider surgery in patients with sterile necrosis under the following circumstances Patients who fail to improve after about two to thr Continue reading >>

Life After Pancreatic Surgery | Upmc Healthbeat

Life After Pancreatic Surgery | Upmc Healthbeat

Surgery to treat pancreatic cancer can remove cancerous tumors and has the potential to extend life. At the same time, undergoing pancreatic surgery can be challenging. Even minimally invasive surgery still involves an operation, recovery time, and a hospital stay. Although most people wont experience major complications after these procedures, the experience can affect the way you live, at least while you recover. Heres what you can expect following your operation. The most common type of pancreatic surgery is called Whipple surgery . During this procedure, your surgeon will remove the head, or right-hand portion, of the pancreas , where most tumors occur. Because of the location of this organ, he or she must also remove: A new, less-invasive form of Whipple surgery uses a robotic device to more accurately guide surgical instruments in the abdomen. Whatever type of pancreatic surgery you have, youll experience some changes to your health and routine afterward. RELATED: What Do Intestines Do for the Body? Most post-surgical complications arent life-threatening, but they still require close observation from your health care team. The most frequent complication from pancreatic surgery is leaking of pancreatic juices from the incision. You may also experience bleeding or an infection of the surgical site. For these reasons, your doctor will recommend that you remain in the hospital for four to 10 days, depending on the type of surgery youve had. While in the hospital, youll be given medications to help ease the pain of surgery. Youve just had major surgery on many of the organs that make up your digestive system. So, it stands to reason that youll experience some changes to digestion. Following surgery, you will initially only be able to eat small amounts of food. You may Continue reading >>

Surgical Removal Of Part Of The Pancreas And Other Tissues Versus Other Treatments For Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Which Invades The Surrounding Structures

Surgical Removal Of Part Of The Pancreas And Other Tissues Versus Other Treatments For Patients With Pancreatic Cancer Which Invades The Surrounding Structures

PubMed Health. A service of the National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet]. Chichester, UK: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd; 2003-. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD010244.pub2 Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews: Plain Language Summaries [Internet]. Surgical removal of part of the pancreas and other tissues versus other treatments for patients with pancreatic cancer which invades the surrounding structures Link to full article: [ Cochrane Library ] The pancreas is an organ in the abdomen which secretes digestive juices for the digestion of food. It also harbours the insulin secreting cells which maintain the blood sugar levels. Pancreatic cancer is an aggressive cancer. Surgery to remove the cancer improves survival. However, a third of patients with pancreatic cancer have locally advanced cancer involving major blood vessels which are not usually removed because of the fear of increased complications after surgery. Such patients receive palliative treatment . Resection (removing part of an organ) of the pancreas has been suggested as an alternative to palliative treatment for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. However, in this group of patients the benefits and harms of surgical resection versus other treatments are not clear. We set out to answer this question by performing a thorough search of the literature for studies which compared surgical removal with palliative treatments. We included only randomised controlled trials , studies which, if designed appropriately, can help avoid arriving at wrong conclusions. We searched the literature for all studies reported until December 2013. Two authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and independently extracted Continue reading >>

Surgery & Endoscopic Procedures For Pancreatitis

Surgery & Endoscopic Procedures For Pancreatitis

Surgery & Endoscopic Procedures for Pancreatitis Sometimes, acute pancreatitis is caused by gallstones that block the duct through which digestive enzymes leave the pancreas. NYU Langone pancreatic surgeons can perform an endoscopic procedure to remove the blockage, allowing the pancreas to function normally. Our doctors may also perform surgery to relieve severe complications of acute pancreatitis, such as infection and tissue death, also called necrosis. Meet Our Doctors Or Call Us: 646-929-7950 For chronic pancreatitis, surgery may be recommended if chronic inflammation has caused a blockage in the pancreatic ducts. Surgery can help prevent further damage to the pancreas and alleviate symptoms like persistent pain. Pancreatic surgeons at NYU Langone work as a team with imaging specialists using advanced diagnostic techniques to locate the areas of the pancreas where damage has occurred. For many people, surgery can be performed using minimally invasive, or laparoscopic, techniques, which require smaller incisions. General anesthesia is typically used for all of the following procedures. Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography For acute pancreatitis caused by gallstones lodged in the common bile duct, doctors may perform a procedure called endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography to remove the stones and prevent further inflammation in the pancreas. During the procedure, your doctor glides an endoscope with a tiny video camera on the end through the mouth, down the throat and stomach, and into the small intestine, adjacent to the pancreas. Using the endoscope, your doctor finds an opening in the intestine that connects to the pancreatic and bile ducts. He or she places a catheter or small tube in the opening and injects a contrast dye. The dye enhances i Continue reading >>

All Can You Live Without A Portion Of Your Pancreas? Messages

All Can You Live Without A Portion Of Your Pancreas? Messages

Can you live without a portion of your pancreas? I have a dear friend who was just diagnosed with pancreatic cancer today. He has not even spoken to the oncologist to find out what they will do going forward. Apparently his lymph nodes are clear. I was wondering if they could remove most of the tumor and his pancreas, followed with traditional chemo and/or radiation therapy and look forward to a long life afterward. He is 48. Does anyone know of at least one case of this or am I being too optomistic? RE: Can you live without a portion of your pancreas? by PingPong_Ball on Fri Jan 25, 2008 12:00 AM Yes, I'm alive. My pancreasis now calling a medical waste landfill in New Jersey home as it was removed last October. Before I was totally gutted like a fish, 75% of it was removed in August. With only 25% of a pancreas, my body still produced some insulin & digestive enzymes. A total pancdretomy (I alwaysmisspell this word to the point my spell check won't even give me suggestions) will live your frienda diabetic andhis body will no longer produce digestive enzymes. This means he'll need to be careful ofhis diet,will beinsulin dependant, and will need to take digestive enzyme pills whenhe eats.A personcan return to a somewhat normal life style ifthey eat right, exercise, and take care of themselves. A strong network of support also helps, so your pal is lucky to have you as a friend. The healing process from a total pancdretomy can be painful. For example, it can take a few months for one's body to remember that food should go down into the stomach instead of coming back up. Delayed Gastric emptying is no fun! I made it a game called Will It Stay Down? As a friend, one of the worst things you can doit give your buddy tips on how to eat if he experiences delayed gastric empty Continue reading >>

Having An Operation On The Pancreas: Faq

Having An Operation On The Pancreas: Faq

Let us assume you (the reader) are going to have a pancreatic resection. The following section attempts to answer some of the questions you may have in mind, and the answers are addressed to you. We can start with the names of the operations. Whipple's operation isalso known as a pancreato-duodenectomy (a variation on this is called pylorus-preserving pancreato-duodenectomy) The head of the pancreas lies next to a part of your bowel called the duodenum. Also running within the head is a part of the bile duct (the tube that carries bile from the liver to the gut). So if you have a tumour in the head of the pancreas, and the head needs to be removed, it is usually removed along with the duodenum, and that part of the bile duct. Often, the gall bladder is removed as well. Once these have been removed, the surgeon rejoins bowel to bowel (so that food can go down), pancreas to bowel (so that pancreatic juice can flow into the bowel), and bile duct to bowel (so that bile can flow into the bowel). If a pylorus-preserving pancreato-duodenectomy (a form of the Whipple operation) is performed to remove a tumour in the head of the pancreas, the dotted red line in this diagram encircles the organs that are removed. Sometimes, the problem may lie in the body or tail of the pancreas, which need to be removed. The spleen lies close to the tail of the pancreas and often has to be removed during this operation. If a distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy is performed to remove a tumour in the tail of the pancreas, the dotted red line in this diagram encircles the organs that are removed. Total pancreatectomy, Central pancreatectomy and Enucleation Very rarely, it may be necessary to remove the entire pancreas (i.e. total pancreatectomy). This is possible, and generally involves removal Continue reading >>

Can You Live Without A Pancreas? What You Need To Know

Can You Live Without A Pancreas? What You Need To Know

While it is possible to live without a pancreas, doctors only recommend removing a pancreas when a person has a serious medical condition such as severe recurrent pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. In most cases, medical treatments can take the place of the pancreas, but people living without a pancreas require diligent monitoring and medical care. Removal of the pancreas also means a person will have to make a variety of lifestyle changes that can be tough to adjust to. Contents of this article: Can you live without a pancreas? The pancreas is a gland that secretes hormones that a person needs to survive, including insulin. Decades ago, serious problems with the pancreas were almost always fatal. Now, it is possible for people to live without a pancreas. Surgery to remove the pancreas is called pancreatectomy. The surgery can be partial, removing only the diseased portion of the pancreas, or a surgeon may remove the entire pancreas. A complete pancreatectomy that removes the entire pancreas also requires the removal of parts of the stomach, a portion of the small intestine called the duodenum, and the end of the bile duct. The gallbladder and the spleen may be removed as well. This extensive surgery can be dangerous and life-changing. After a pancreatectomy, a person will develop diabetes. They need to change their diet and lifestyle and will have to take insulin for the rest of their lives. People who cannot produce enough insulin develop diabetes, which is why removing the pancreas automatically triggers the condition. Removing the pancreas can also reduce the body's ability to absorb nutrients from food. Without artificial insulin injections and digestive enzymes, a person without a pancreas cannot survive. One 2016 study found that about three-quarters of people wi Continue reading >>

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