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Can You Regenerate Your Pancreas?

Can The Body Repair Its Own Pancreas?

Can The Body Repair Its Own Pancreas?

Can the body repair its own pancreas? While the imagery that comes to mind might seem like something out of a science-fiction novel, the truth is that real science is outsmarting the fiction here. All indicators, according to a recent study, are that if we set up the right environment, the body can likely repair its own damaged pancreatic cells. Damaged pancreatic cells can lead to diabetes, and this is a key focus in the researchif the body can repair its own pancreas, do we have a potential treatment for diabetes? Before I discuss the study, lets review the pancreas and diabetes. The pancreas is roughly a tadpole-shaped organ (with a head, body, and tail) that lives behind our stomach. Its head nestles into the inner curve of our duodenum (the first part of the small intestine that our stomach contents empty into) where it connects via the pancreatic duct. Its body and tail span the width of our stomach, ending on the left side of our abdomen at the spleen. The pancreas functions of part of both the gastrointestinal, or digestive, system and the endocrine system. Though it has other functions, most people know it best, by far, as the gland that releases the hormone insulin to help keep our blood sugar levels under control. And the reason they know it is because when the pancreas isnt releasing insulin properly, this can lead to diabetes, an extremely prevalent disease in the United States. On its website, the American Diabetes Association provides the following 2012 statistics on Diabetes in the U.S.: 29.1 million (9.3%) Americans have diabetes 1.4 million are newly diagnosed each year 86 million age 20 and older have prediabetes Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the U.S. The specific cells within the pancreas that produce, store, and secrete insulin are Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Pancreatic Cells Could Regenerate And Produce Insulin Again In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

In type 1 diabetes, the body’s own immune system attacks cells in the pancreas, known as beta-cells, which produce the hormone insulin. Insulin is needed for moving glucose out of the blood stream and into muscles and other tissues. The condition is usually diagnosed after around 70 per cent of the beta-cells cease to function and type 1 diabetics need to inject a synthetic form of insulin to replace the missing hormone. In type 2 diabetes, too, insulin production tends to decline, with the beta-cells dying off faster than normal. Several different factors appear to be involved in this, including high blood sugar and blood fat levels, inflammatory compounds and high levels of the hormone leptin. More people with type 2 diabetes now inject insulin than those with type 1. At one time, it was thought that losing the ability to produce insulin was permanent and irreversible. But as I wrote here, scientists have discovered recently that beta-cell function can come back – in animal models of diabetes, at least. Now, a study published in the journal Nature on 20 August has shown just how remarkable this capacity for regeneration could be. The pancreas looks to be even more adaptable and to possess a greater potential for self-healing than was previously assumed. The researchers, at the University of Geneva in Switzerland, are the first to reveal a mechanism by which other cells in the pancreas called delta-cells, (which produce somatostatin, another pancreatic hormone) revert to a precursor-like cell state before being ‘reborn’ as beta-cells in diabetic mice.1 Although this only appears to happen in young mice with type 1 diabetes, it provides further evidence that loss of beta-cell function might not be the end of the story. Science is moving ahead fast in this area. Continue reading >>

Can Fasting Diet Help Regenerate A Diabetic Pancreas?

Can Fasting Diet Help Regenerate A Diabetic Pancreas?

A cycled fasting mimicking diet may help in cases of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, new research in mice has found. In fact, the pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, according to the University of Southern California-led study. The pancreas is an organ that uses specialized cells known as beta cells to produce the hormone insulin, which the body uses to break down sugars in the blood. In type 1 diabetes the pancreas stops producing insulin. In type 2 diabetes either not enough insulin is produced or cells in the body fail to respond to insulin. Valter Longo, director of the Longevity Institute at the USC Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, said: “Cycles of a fasting-mimicking diet and a normal diet essentially reprogrammed non-insulin-producing cells into insulin-producing cells. By activating the regeneration of pancreatic cells, we were able to rescue mice from late-stage type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We also reactivated insulin production in human pancreatic cells from type 1 diabetes patients.” Low Calorie High Fat Diet Mice were fed for four days on a low-calorie, low-protein and low-carbohydrate but high-fat (FMD) diet, receiving half their normal daily calorie intake on day one, followed by three days of 10% of their normal calorie intake. Researchers repeated this fast on three occasions, with 10 days of re-feeding in between. They then examined the pancreas. They found in mice modeled to have both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, insulin production was restored, insulin resistance was reduced, and beta cells could be regenerated. Early lab study involving human cell samples showed similar potential. These are promising results, but further studies are needed to validate these findings in humans. If you have either type 1 or Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

Fasting Diet 'regenerates Diabetic Organ'

The pancreas can be triggered to regenerate itself through a type of fasting diet, say US researchers. Restoring the function of the organ - which helps control blood sugar levels - reversed symptoms of diabetes in animal experiments. The study, published in the journal Cell, says the diet reboots the body. Experts said the findings were "potentially very exciting" as they could become a new treatment for the disease. People are advised not to try this without medical advice. In the experiments, mice were put on a modified form of the "fasting-mimicking diet". It is like the human form of the diet when people spend five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate but high unsaturated-fat diet. It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want - so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine. Previous research has suggested it can slow the pace of ageing. Diabetes therapy? But animal experiments showed the diet regenerated a special type of cell in the pancreas called a beta cell. These are the cells that detect sugar in the blood and release the hormone insulin if it gets too high. Dr Valter Longo, from the University of Southern California, said: "Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back - by starving them and then feeding them again - the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that's no longer functioning." There were benefits in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in the mouse experiments. Type 1 is caused by the immune system destroying beta cells and type 2 is largely caused by lifestyle and the body no longer responding to insulin. Further t Continue reading >>

Islet Regeneration - Center For Regenerative Medicine - Mayo Clinic Research

Islet Regeneration - Center For Regenerative Medicine - Mayo Clinic Research

Researchers and physicians are studying how to restore, protect and replace pancreatic islets, which may lead to new treatments for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The ultimate goal of the Islet Regeneration Program in the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Mayo Clinic is to develop therapies for the treatment of diabetes through diverse regenerative approaches, including: The endocrine cells of the pancreas, contained in the islets of Langerhans, are responsible for maintaining blood glucose levels. Glucose-responsive, insulin-secreting cells in the islets (beta cells) are dysfunctional in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes , beta cells are destroyed, while in type 2 diabetes , they may not produce enough insulin. Since it's not yet possible to transplant new, patient-specific, functional beta cells, people with type 1 diabetes need insulin therapy. People with type 2 diabetes often need medication, with some people requiring insulin therapy. The islet regeneration researchers are taking multiple approaches to restore, protect and replace pancreatic islets. Coupling these efforts with basic science and clinical research aimed at understanding islet biology and diabetes, the Islet Regeneration Program at Mayo Clinic is poised to develop novel therapies for diabetes. To address the islet dysfunction characteristic in diabetes, researchers in the Center for Regenerative Medicine are focused on generating pancreatic beta cells from stem cells and on re-creating the beta cells' normal cellular environment (islets of Langerhans). In addition to insulin-producing beta cells, the islets of Langerhans are composed of additional specialized cell types that are important for optimal functioning of the islet. Specialized islet cells include alpha cells, which produc Continue reading >>

[is There Pancreatic Regeneration? Morphological And Functional Certification After A Corporocaudal Splenopancreatectomy/].

[is There Pancreatic Regeneration? Morphological And Functional Certification After A Corporocaudal Splenopancreatectomy/].

[Is there pancreatic regeneration? Morphological and functional certification after a corporocaudal splenopancreatectomy/]. Servicio de Ciruga, Hospital de Clnicas Jos de San Martn, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Buenos Aires. [email protected] The process of pancreatic regeneration, well known and accepted, is less known than the hepatic and includes different mechanisms and factors. Pancreatic regeneration is better known in acute pancreatitis. After an extensive pancreatic necrosis, the morphological and functional regeneration is assessed by dynamic computed tomography associated with normalization of glycemia and the exocrine function. Different groups identified and evaluated experimentally and clinically the actions of multiple factors involved in the process of pancreatic regeneration. Even difficult to assess, pancreatic regeneration after partial pancreatectomy is well documented and of capital importance. A 57-year-old woman with discomfort in the upper-left abdominal quadrant. CT scans showed a tumor in the body and tail of the pancreas adherent to the spleen. Preoperative CA 19-9 was normal. She was operated on and the tumor resected en bloc with the spleen. Only the head of the pancreas was preserved. Intraoperative pathological examination of the specimen showed a mucinous cistoadenoma with no malignant degeneration. Postoperative course was uneventful and discharged at p.o. day 10, with ongoing diabetes. Four month later she presented pain in the upper-left quadrant with hyperamylasemia. CT scans showed a normal body and tail with an image of pseudocyst at the top of the pancreatic tail. One year after the initial surgery she remained asymptomatic, without diabetes and with no dietary restrictions. Further CT controls showed images of the Continue reading >>

Fasting Regenerates Your Pancreas

Fasting Regenerates Your Pancreas

Weekly Health Quiz: Vitamin D, Cherries and Concussions Research involving lab mice shows a fasting-mimicking diet not only can help your pancreas regenerate itself, but it can also reverse diabetes symptoms Other animal studies suggest restricting calories to a six-hour window can significantly reduce levels of a particular mutant protein known to play a role in Huntington's disease Fasting has been shown to be beneficial in lowering your risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and diabetes; it also boosts your bodys immune system and antiaging potential Three fasting methods I encourage you to consider are: the fasting-mimicking diet, intermittent fasting or water-only fasting I personally have experienced great results with both intermittent fasting and water-only fasting, and I believe fasting is one of the best tools you can use in the fight against chronic disease Fasting is a powerful tool nearly anyone can use to take control of their health. Animal research indicates a fasting-mimicking diet not only can help your pancreas regenerate itself, but it can also reverse diabetes symptoms. In another study, also involving lab mice, restricting daily calories to a six-hour window significantly reduced levels of a particular mutant protein known to play a role in Huntington's disease. Given these results, as well as other research, the tremendous benefits of fasting continue to emerge. If you haven't yet considered how fasting can make a positive difference to your health, I encourage you to keep reading and also consider one of three methods: the fasting-mimicking diet, intermittent fasting or water-only fasting. Fasting is one of the best tools you can use in the fight against chronic disease. Fasting-Mimicking Regenerates Pancreas, Eliminates Diabetes in Lab Mice In Continue reading >>

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Beta Cells Be Healed?

Can Type 2 or Type 1 diabetes be not only reversed, but cured? Can beta cells start producing enough insulin? Can the liver store glucose better, and can body cells learn to handle glucose more efficiently? We always hear that diabetes is incurable, and so far it has been. But people are trying. Diabetes affects so many organs; we’ll have to investigate them one at a time. This week we’ll look at beta cells in the pancreas. If you have Type 1 or 2 diabetes or prediabetes, you have damaged beta cells. So you don’t have enough insulin, and what you have may not be released when it’s needed. If the cells were healed, diabetes would pretty much go away. But is this possible, and how could it be done? In Type 1 diabetes, cells from the immune system attack and destroy beta cells. Type 1.5 diabetes or LADA (latent autoimmune diabetes of adults) probably involves a similar process. So restoring beta cells in Type 1 or 1.5 will probably require changing the immune system. Reducing the need for insulin by eating a healthy diet helps, but I don’t know of any Type 1s or people with LADA who recovered normal beta cell function by diet alone. Many are looking at surgically replacing beta cells. Hundreds of experimental “islet cell transplants” have been done. But the results aren’t great. This approach will only work if we could also “turn off” whatever process is killing beta cells in the first place. But there’s a lot of money in it, so I’m sure the research will continue. Research is going on into drugs that might stop the immune system’s attack. A drug called teplizumab is being studied and shows promise. But as a person with an immune disease of my own, I’m pretty sure this progress will be slow. The immune system is not well understood yet. Beta cel Continue reading >>

Can You Reboot Your Pancreas?

Can You Reboot Your Pancreas?

There’s no doubt that Type 2 diabetes has a big impact on the lives of people living with it. We know that medication only manages the glucose levels, there is no medication which treats the underlying cause of the disease. But - new research is showing that there is another way to get the liver and pancreas back to normal function and treat the underlying cause. It is insulin resistance that is the real disease - diabetes is just the symptom. What is insulin resistance? Let’s go back to the beginning and have a look at the amazing systems your body has in place to make sure your cells have all the energy they need. Your pancreas and liver are the powerhouses when it comes to managing your blood sugars. This is what happens in a non-diabetic Your cells need energy to function. All cells have a door on them called an insulin receptor - this lets glucose into the cell. Insulin is the key that opens the door and lets the glucose in In Type 2 Diabetes it’s a totally different story. The cells lose some of their ‘doors’ (called insulin resistance) so a destructive cycle starts happening: Cells want glucose Insulin is released. The pancreas will go into overdrive producing, even more, insulin - banging on the ‘doors’ trying to get them to open up. Insulin opens every door they can find, but there are not enough doors. Cells still need more glucose, so they tell the liver to produce some glucose. Liver pumps out glucose(created from glucose stores or from protein). If this continues the pancreas gets exhausted and starts burning out and can’t keep banging on the ‘doors’. The glucose starts building up in your bloodstream - it has nowhere to go. The extra glucose is running around in your bloodstream and starts sticking to your red blood cells. This coats th Continue reading >>

Psychoactive Plant May Hold Key To Reversing Diabetes

Psychoactive Plant May Hold Key To Reversing Diabetes

Psychoactive Plant May Hold Key to Reversing Diabetes Written by R. Sam Barclay on March 9, 2015 New research published in Nature Medicine may have unlocked a new line of treatment for diabetes. The researchers honed in on the main culprits in diabetes: beta cells. These cells concentrate in the pancreas in little clusters called islets, and they produce the insulin necessary to keep the bodys blood sugar levels stable. In children and adults with type 1 diabetes, theyve lost 99 percent of their beta cells, so they cannot make enough insulin. Thats the cause of their diabetes, said Andrew Stewart, director of the Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism Institute at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York City and senior author of the study, in an interview with Healthline. People with type 2 diabetes also have about a 50 or 60 percent reduction in their number of beta cells in their pancreas, and so they too cannot make enough insulin. Although many drugs exist to control the symptoms of diabetes, there currently is no reliable way to replace beta cells and cure the disease. Stewart joined with lead author Peng Wang and others on a multidisciplinary team to tackle the problem. In the world of beta cell regeneration, you can do it in two ways. You can either use stem cells, create stem cells and then transplant them. Or you could take a drug that makes your own beta cells grow, Stewart explained. Although the stem cell transplant research is promising, it involves an invasive procedure and will have difficulty meeting the massive demand, he said. Diabetes affects more than 20 million Americans , according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The need vastly outstrips the stem cell islet supply, said Stewart. It would be simply much simpler to Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet For People With Diabetes Could Regenerate The Pancreas

Fasting Diet For People With Diabetes Could Regenerate The Pancreas

New research shows that a diet which mimics fasting might be able to push beta cells in the pancreas to repair themselves and start making insulin again. Mice put on fasting diet BBC news reported that for the research study, mice in the lab were put on a modified form of the “fasting-mimicking diet”. The diet is similar to the human practice of spending five days on a low-calorie, low-protein, low-carbohydrate diet. “It resembles a vegan diet with nuts and soups, but with around 800 to 1,100 calories a day. Then they have 25 days eating what they want – so overall it mimics periods of feast and famine,” says BBC news. A press release on Eureka Alert explained that the researchers used two different mouse models of two types of diabetes to study how the diet affected the mice. One group had a gene mutation that causes insulin resistance and loss of insulin secretion, which mimicked type 2 diabetes. The other group was treated with a chemical to destroy the mice’s beta cells, which was the model for type 1 diabetes. Both groups were put on the diet for three cycles. Excitingly, this diet showed the possibility of regeneration of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas which had stopped or slowed production of insulin in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. Diet regenerates beta cells Senior author of the study, Dr. Valter Longo of the University of Southern California School of Gerontology and Director of the USC Longevity Institute, told Eureka Alert, “Our conclusion is that by pushing the mice into an extreme state and then bringing them back–by starving them and then feeding them again–the cells in the pancreas are triggered to use some kind of developmental reprogramming that rebuilds the part of the organ that’s no longer functio Continue reading >>

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Breaking News – Your Pancreas Can Regenerate Itself!

Diabetes is beatable. But don’t wait around for doctors to tell you how. The bottom line is that current medical treatments for diabetes do not reverse or control the disease. To do that, you have to approach it naturally. In diabetes, it’s the beta cells of the pancreas that are in low numbers. The beta cells are important because they make insulin. Degeneration of the beta cells is the main cause of type I diabetes. Exclusive Bonus: Download the 3-point checklist which shows you EXACTLY how to regenerate your beta cells naturally using this scientifically-proven method. Over 2000 medical studies have reported on the topic of pancreas regeneration. Yet you probably haven’t heard about them on television or radio. This may be for several reasons. But the main reason could be that pancreas regeneration is most effectively achieved by herbs, not medical procedures. Much stem cell research has focused on the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to diabetic animals to see what happens. These studies all show the same thing: a significant reduction in blood glucose level, plus regeneration of the pancreas cells. The regeneration is determined by seeing an increase in the total number of islet cells and insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. That’s all well and good. But finding donors of pancreas cells is still quite difficult. Everyone needs their pancreas for their own health and no one wants to donate it. Embryonic stem cells, a potential source of new pancreatic cells, are big in the news right now with the latest Planned Parenthood scam of selling aborted baby parts for research. So their source is quite ethically questionable. Delta-cells in the Pancreas Researchers at the University of Geneva in Switzerland revealed a mechanism by which other cells in t Continue reading >>

Fasting Diet Could Regenerate Pancreas And Reverse Diabetes, Researchers Say

Fasting Diet Could Regenerate Pancreas And Reverse Diabetes, Researchers Say

A fasting diet has the ability to regenerate the pancreas and could potentially reverse diabetes, researchers have found. A US study, published in scientific journal Cell, tested a modified version of the fasting-mimicking diet (FMD) on both mice and human cells. The findings showed cycles of the diet could regenerate pancreatic cells to restore insulin in type 1 diabetes patients and could also reverse both type 1 and 2 diabetes in mice. The study's co-author, Dr Valter Longo from the University of Southern California, told the ABC the findings were "potentially very exciting" because they could lead to cures for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, unlike type 2, is an autoimmune condition for which there is no known cause or cure. In patients with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops producing insulin. Dr Longo also said a FMD could also regenerate other organs because their research had shown similar effects for blood cells. "They show that extreme diets with very specific compositions can trigger self repair and regeneration processes in the mouse and possibly humans," Dr Longo said. Taking into account the challenges and side-effects of fasting in humans, Dr Longo and his team developed a modified low-calorie, low-protein and low-carbohydrate but high-fat four-day FMD. The diet caused changes in the levels of specific growth factors, glucose, and ketone bodies and reduced the blood glucose on pre-diabetic patients. Mice receiving the FMD showed improved glucose tolerance and insulin tolerance. The pancreas helps to control blood sugar levels and restoring the organ can reverse the symptoms of diabetes. The diet can regenerate the pancreas by reprogramming cells into "beta cells" that make insulin. The study found cycles of the FMD could promote the gen Continue reading >>

Can The Pancreas Regenerate | Diabetic Connect

Can The Pancreas Regenerate | Diabetic Connect

I have been on insulin for 4 years now and in the last few weeks my glocouse has been in normal rage without taking any shots. Can anyone help me understand if this is normal? I am following a plan very similar to jayabee's. There are foods I avoid because of my body's reaction, but I can handle with moderation. I have read that both the liver and pancreas can regenerate depending on when in the degenerative process we wise up enough to stop overtaxing them. Don't know if that's medically correct or not. I still had pancreatic function when diagnosed and have never used insulin. I am type 2. I have been on oral diabetes meds, and then on insulin for a while. But lately I had been motivated to attempt to manage my condition without diabetes meds simply through what I eat and don't eat. I have been on this plan since Feb 2011, and have maintained good control. My May A1c was 5.5. and I have lost about 50 lbs on the plan. My pancreas was still putting out its own insulin, and my weight loss reduced my insulin resistance, so if I am careful about what I put in my mouth, what my pancreas puts out balances with the load I put on my body by my eating. So far so good! So you might be one of the fortunate ones who has enough pancreatic output to support a carefully controlled meal plan. It does take a bit of discipline, but for me going without meds is worth it. I would be happy to share what I do should you be interested. But talk to your Dr about trying this out before you do anything. You can always fall back to diabetes meds should it not work for you. Thanks, and I would like you to give me your advice on on your controlled diet and I do feel my pancreas has jumprd back on line. Thanks again I have discontinued eating bread of any kind (biscuits, buns, tortillas cornbread, Continue reading >>

Can You Grow New Beta Cells When Your Beta Cells Fail ?

Can You Grow New Beta Cells When Your Beta Cells Fail ?

Small things can make a big difference to your health Posted by Dr Sandy on in Diabetes | 1432 Views | Leave a response Beta cells can regenerate under the right circumstances Diabetes happens when beta cells fail, but beta cells can be regenerated naturally. Fancy stem cell technology or drugs are not required, diet will do it Your beta cells are failing (pre-diabetes) or have failed (diabetes), leaving you struggling to keep sugar levels in check. Ive been asking the question for years. What prompted the pondering was a car accident. Lucky for me, no bones were broken but I was black and blue ALL OVER. And it hurt like crazy ! I watched incredulously as my body put itself back together every day I got a little better. It took about three weeks for all the outward signs of the trauma to heal, a little longer for the inner aches and pains to dissipate and a whole lot longer for the fear of driving to subside. The body seems to have the capacity to regenerate bones knit together, cuts and gashes, close up. How come the pancreas didnt heal ? The short answer to this question is probably, the problem aka the thing causing the injury, never goes away. Unfortunately, scientists are still not sure what the thing is. insulin is involved. Bad body chemistry keeps beta cells from healing. Unfortunately fixing body chemistry is complicated high sugar levels, cause high insulin levels, which cause beta cell destruction, which causes high sugar levels. Researchers from the University of Southern California, have found a way to regenerate beta cells, naturally. Albeit it, the beta cells theyve regenerated are mouse beta cells, not human beta cells. But they did it, without fancy stem cell technology or drugs. Its not what they added to the diet, but what they took away.. The resear Continue reading >>

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