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Can You Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Prevent Type 2 Diabetes?

If there were things you could do to prevent type 2 diabetes, would they be worth the effort? The answer is a resounding “Yes!” And here’s why. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Over time, it can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, as well as vision loss, kidney failure, nerve damage, and the loss of limbs.1 The disease is virtually a pandemic in the United States, affecting almost 30 million people. And as many as 95 percent of those cases are type 2 diabetes.2 What is type 2 diabetes? Diabetes is a condition in which blood sugar levels are dangerously high. It is a disorder of the metabolism, which is the way our bodies use food for energy. Most of the food we eat is broken down into glucose. It enters the bloodstream and travels to cells throughout the body where it is used for energy. A hormone called insulin must be present to allow glucose, or blood sugar, to enter the cells. In people who have type 2 diabetes, however, there are usually two problems. First, the body doesn’t make enough insulin. Second, tissues such as muscle and fat cells develop a resistance to insulin. When this happens, the body can no longer maintain normal blood sugar levels. Blood sugar rises dangerously high. This is when diabetes has developed.3 It starts with prediabetes Before full-blown diabetes develops, most people go through a stage called prediabetes. This occurs when blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough for a diagnosis of diabetes. Many people with prediabetes develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. In addition, they are at risk for heart disease and stroke.3 5 tips for preventing type 2 diabetes Risk Factors for Diabetes Race or ethnic background – If you are of African-American, Asian-Ame Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Every day we make choices that affect our health. Take these important five steps to make your lifestyle healthier and to start to prevent or reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and pre-diabetes: Maintain a healthy weight Include a good balance of activity and healthy diet Talk to your healthcare provider about what a healthy weight is for you Eat a healthy, balanced diet Eat a diet with lots of variety Eat more fibre Eat less fat and salt Limit the amount of alcohol you drink Select appropriate portion sizes Ensure regular physical activity Be active at least 30 minutes every day Include activities that build endurance, strength and flexibility Find activities that you enjoy and that include your family Don't smoke If you smoke, it's never too late to quit Avoid second-hand smoke Keep your health in check Get enough sleep and rest Be active - physical activity is a great way to reduce stress Manage high blood pressure, cholesterol and glucose If You Already Have Diabetes Living a healthy lifestyle is also very important in preventing or delaying diabetes complications. Also visit the Living with Diabetes section. Additional Resources Adapted from material prepared by the Canadian Diabetes Association. This FAQ appeared originally on the Canadian Health Network Web site and has been edited for publication by the Public Health Agency of Canada. Continue reading >>

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

10 Foods That Can Help Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is an epidemic in the United States, with about 29 million people who have it, another 8 million who are undiagnosed and 86 million who are considered pre-diabetic, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes, the most common form, is a disease in which the body’s cells don’t use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to get glucose into the cells, but over time, the pancreas can’t make enough to keep blood glucose levels normal and the result is type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes increases a person’s risk for several health conditions including high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. It’s also responsible for as many as 12 percent of deaths in the U.S., three times higher than previous estimates, a January 2017 study in the journal PLOS ONE found. Although genetics can increase your chances of developing type 2 diabetes, both diet and exercise also play a big role. In fact, people with pre-diabetes who lost just 5 to 7 percent of their body weight reduced their risk by 54 percent, a study out of John Hopkins in July 2013 found. Here, experts weigh in with 10 foods that balance your blood sugar and can prevent diabetes: 1. Apples You might think fruit is off the menu because of its sugar content, but fruit is filled with vitamins and nutrients that can help ward off diabetes. Apples are one of the best fruits you can eat because they’re rich in quercetin, a plant pigment. Quercetin helps the body secrete insulin more efficiently and wards off insulin resistance, which occurs when the body has to make more and more insulin to help glucose enter the cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark characteristic of type 2 diabetes. “It’s filled with antioxidants, and also there’s fiber in the fruit that nat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

You may be able to prevent type 2 diabetes. Even if you have several of the risk factors and even if you’ve been told you have pre-diabetes, you can take action and reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Don’t delay: if you’ve been told that you’re at risk of developing diabetes, get started as soon as possible. Your healthcare provider can help you develop a plan, but it should include: Getting to—and staying at—a healthy weight: Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, so if you’re overweight, you should take steps to lose weight. By losing 5% to 10% of your body weight, you can reduce your risk. You can do this by eating smaller portions and being more physically active, which, conveniently enough, are two other ways to prevent type 2 diabetes. Reduce portions and eat healthier: You should choose healthier food choices by reducing portions and limiting added fat and sugar. Choose more whole grains, vegetables, and lean meats and dairy products. Seek out new, healthy recipes; there are many cookbooks that offer lower-fat and healthier recipes. A terrific rule to follow is: everything in moderation. Reduce portion sizes overall. Limit your intake of alcohol; you don’t have to entirely avoid it. Eat small, well-balanced meals spread throughout the day; larger meals can make it more difficult to keep your blood glucose level in a healthy range. Exercising: Exercise is important to help prevent type 2 diabetes because it has so many benefits. It can help you lose weight, and if you’re insulin resistant, it can help your body increase its sensitivity to insulin (exercise can help you use insulin better). Plus, exercise keeps your heart strong, makes you sleep better, and can even put you in a better mood. Continue reading >>

How Can I Prevent Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Prevent Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?

Question:How can I prevent type 1 or type 2 diabetes? Answer:There are usually two flavors of diabetes. Type 1 used to be called juvenile onset diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes. And it is caused by an attack by your own immune system -- (it's) called an autoimmune disease -- on the cells in the pancreas that make insulin. So what happens is that over time, usually during childhood, this autoimmune attack attacks your pancreas just like it would happen if it was a bacterium and it destroys these beta cells. There is no way, currently, that we know of, to prevent type 1 diabetes. Children or young adults or even older people who get it, there is really little that we can do to either slow down or prevent the development of this disease. Type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult onset diabetes because it most often affects people beyond the age of 45 or 50, is the really the epidemic form of diabetes and it is associated with increasing weight, obesity, decreasing life style. In addition, it more commonly occurs in people of racial minorities. So for example, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans and American Indians are more likely to get this form of diabetes. Since the risk factors that lead to this form of diabetes include increasing weight and decreasing activity levels, it shouldn't be surprising that there have been a number of studies that have been performed, including one called the Diabetes Prevention Program, that showed that you can prevent this disease from occurring if you lose weight and if you increase your activity level. In the Diabetes Prevention Program, the volunteers there lost about 7 percent, which was about for them about 15 pounds of weight and increased their activity level by walking about 30 minutes most evenings or Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes: Can You Prevent It From Becoming Type 2 Diabetes?

Pre-diabetes: Can You Prevent It From Becoming Type 2 Diabetes?

The line between “pre-diabetes” and “type 2 diabetes” is a very thin line. According to the American Diabetes Association, an A1C between 5.7 to 6.4 percent will earn you a diagnosis of “pre-diabetes.” Anything above 6.5 percent will be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. In terms of blood sugar readings, a fasting blood sugar between 100 to 125 mg/dL qualifies as pre-diabetic. Anything above is considered type 2 diabetes. The unfortunate part of that very thin line between “pre-diabetic” and “type 2 diabetic” is that your blood sugars just need to run a smidge higher in order to qualify you for an overwhelming and life-changing diagnosis. The benefit to that very thin line is that it shows just how little change needs to occur in your A1C in order to prevent your status from escalating to “full-blown” type 2 diabetes. Certainly, there are many mysteries that still persist when it comes to understanding type 2 diabetes, such as why changes in diet and exercise are enough for some people to manage healthy blood sugar levels while they’re not enough for others. Research continues to dig into why people who are thin and active can develop type 2 diabetes, and on the contrary, why obesity alone does not indicate diabetes since not all people who are obese present with high blood sugars or insulin resistance. It’s actually far more complicated than simply what you eat, how much you exercise, and what you weigh. But for many, there are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing pre-diabetes, and, if given that diagnosis, there are things you can do to reduce the likelihood of it progressing to a status of type 2. What Causes Pre-Diabetes? “It’s the job of the body’s pancreas to make insulin to be used to bring glucose that results from our Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a serious health condition where blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough yet to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 84 million American adults—more than 1 out of 3—have prediabetes. Of those with prediabetes, 90% don’t know they have it. Prediabetes puts you at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. The good news is that if you have prediabetes, the CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes and other serious health problems. Causes Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas that acts like a key to let blood sugar into cells for use as energy. If you have prediabetes, the cells in your body don’t respond normally to insulin. Your pancreas makes more insulin to try to get cells to respond. Eventually your pancreas can’t keep up, and your blood sugar rises, setting the stage for prediabetes—and type 2 diabetes down the road. Symptoms & Risk Factors You can have prediabetes for years but have no clear symptoms, so it often goes undetected until serious health problems such as type 2 diabetes show up. It’s important to talk to your doctor about getting your blood sugar tested if you have any of the risk factors for prediabetes, which include: Being overweight Being 45 years or older Having a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Being physically active less than 3 times a week Ever having gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds Race and ethnicity are also a factor: African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk. Getting Tested You can get a simple blood Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

How To Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

Expert Reviewed In the past 30 years, the prevalence of Type 2 Diabetes has skyrocketed to such an extent that it is now viewed as an epidemic in the western world. From being a once fairly mild and rare ailment of the elderly to becoming a chronic disease, this type of diabetes affects people of every age, race, and background, and is now a major modern cause of premature death in many countries around the world. Someone dies from Type 2 Diabetes every 10 seconds worldwide.[1] Happily, there is a great way to prevent Type 2 Diabetes: establish and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Prevention Of Diabetes Mellitus

Tweet When people talk about prevention of diabetes, it is usually about preventing type 2 diabetes. In the majority of cases, type 2 diabetes is brought on by lifestyle factors which can often be prevented. These include an unbalanced diet, lack of activity, lack of sleep, stress, smoking and alcohol. By making lifestyles changes, you can decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes prevention overview Leading doctors and researchers point to excessive levels of insulin as the likely reason why insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes develops. Strategies such as low-carb diets and exercise help to reduce levels of insulin and are therefore effective for preventing type 2 diabetes from developing. There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, some of which are preventable, such as weight gain around the middle (central obesity), high cholesterol/triglyceride levels and high blood pressure. Losing weight, adopting more activity into your day, stopping smoking and reducing alcohol intake can also help towards lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus and improving your all-round health. Diet and preventing type 2 diabetes Diet is the most important part of lifestyle change. The adage that you can’t outrun a bad diet is true. It is much easier to lose weight on a good diet even if you are struggling to do exercise, than it is through exercise if you’re eating a poor diet. Effective diets to prevent type 2 diabetes are those that do not cause your body to produce a lot of insulin. Carbohydrate has the biggest demand on insulin and so any diet that helps reduce carbohydrate intake will help towards reducing your risk of type 2 diabetes. Cutting out sugary food and drink and refined grains such as white bread and white rice is a good Continue reading >>

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

How Can I Reduce My Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Around three in five cases of Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed. However you’ve found out you’re at risk – and knowing is a big first step – the important thing to do now is take action to lower your risk. Evidence shows the best way to reduce your risk of Type 2 diabetes is by: eating better moving more reducing your weight if you’re overweight Where do I start? The key is to find what works for you, fits in with your day and you enjoy. 1. Set clear goals Setting goals can help you break down what you need to do and how to do it. Use our Action Plan (PDF, 66KB)to set healthy goals and keep aFood and activity diary (PDF, 40KB)to keep you on track. 2. Plan ahead It’s helpful to plan meals for the week ahead especially when we all lead busy lives. This can help you reach your goal to eat better and stick to a budget. 3. Start to make healthy changes Time to put your plan into action. Each healthy choice you make is helping you to achieve your goal. If you find it hard, don’t give up – start again tomorrow. 4. Be creative Eating healthily doesn’t have to be boring. Take the opportunity to try new recipes and new food. 5. Sleep well Get a good night’s sleep. Research has shown that if you are tired you feel hungrier and are more likely to want fatty and sugary foods. This can make it harder to stick to your goals. What changes can I make to eat better? Eating better doesn’t have to mean boring or tasteless. We've got plenty of tools, tips and recipes to help you eat healthier. We've got healthier versions of your favourite recipes, or follow our videos and learn to cook a new recipe. How can I move more every day? Getting active and staying active will reduce your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes, and you’ll feel great too. If you're not sur Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

You Can Help Children Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

You Can Help Children Avoid Type 2 Diabetes

Once upon a time, type 2 diabetes was called “adult-onset diabetes.” If children had diabetes, 99 times out of 100 it was type 1 diabetes; type 2 diabetes didn’t appear until midlife. But now, about 3,600 American children are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes each year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Type 2 Diabetes: Why the Increase? “No one is certain why, but most experts believe that it is related in part to the obesity epidemic,” explains Frank Diamond, MD, clinical director for the University of South Florida Diabetes Center and professor of pediatrics at the University of South Florida in Tampa. “We now have approximately 17 percent of the pediatric population that is overweight. Genetically at-risk children may be acquiring the disease earlier because of the increased insulin resistance associated with their early obesity. We are seeing many children with adult weights in our pediatric clinics today.” Dr. Diamond also notes that the increase may be due to a rise in the proportion of children with ethnic minority heritage that puts them at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. Basically, says Paul Robertson, MD, president of medicine and science at the American Diabetes Association, and professor of medicine and pharmacology at the University of Washington in Seattle, the causes of childhood type 2 diabetes boil down to genetic risk mixed with physical inactivity and poor eating habits. “We know if the diets are corrected and they lose the weight, the diabetes becomes undetectable,” says Dr. Robertson. Type 2 Diabetes: What Parents Can Do The first step to preventing type 2 diabetes in childhood is to face the fact that it can happen to children, says Diamond. Then be on guard for symptoms and ask for diabetes scr Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes In At-risk Patients

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes In At-risk Patients

Many physicians now spend less time delivering direct patient care. This is primarily due to increasing administrative responsibilities that are a result of regulatory pressures along with evolving payment and care delivery models. In the average primary care practice, up to one‑third of patients age 18 and above – and up to half age 65 and above – could be at risk for prediabetes. Physicians and their care teams play an important role in diabetes prevention. Preventing type 2 diabetes in at‑risk patients Release Date: June 2015 End Date: June 2019 At the end of this activity, participants will be able to: Define the medical condition of prediabetes and treatment options for prediabetes Identify patients with prediabetes Educate patients at‑risk for type 2 diabetes Determine roles and responsibilities regarding diabetes prevention and practice workflow Refer patients with prediabetes to an evidence‑based diabetes prevention program This activity is designed to meet the educational needs of practicing physicians and their care teams. Eighty‑six million adults in the United States have prediabetes, but 90 percent of them are undiagnosed.1 Up to 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop diabetes within five years.2‑3 People with prediabetes also have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke.1 Early and intensive lifestyle intervention can prevent or delay diabetes in at‑risk patients2‑17 and has also demonstrated secondary prevention of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Physicians and their care teams play an important role in diabetes prevention. This diabetes prevention module presents strategies to help physicians as well as practice staff educate patients about their risk for developing diabetes and refer at‑risk patient Continue reading >>

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Complications

How To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Your type 2 diabetes puts you at an increased risk of a range of serious health problems, including heart attack, high blood pressure, stroke, vision loss, dental problems, and foot problems. By keeping your diabetes in check — most importantly, keeping your blood sugar at a healthy level through diet, exercise, and medication — you can prevent many of these serious complications. You can also help avoid these dangers by learning to recognize a problem and what to do about it if it develops. The most common complications of type 2 diabetes include: Heart disease is the top cause of death in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience the heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately. Stroke. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Call 911 immediately if you experience any of the stroke warning signs. Nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar is another potential consequence for those with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can also make it more difficult for your body to fight infections, causing skin problems. Kidney disease. Type 2 diabetes increases your risk of kidney disease, or diabetic nephropathy, a condition in which the blood vessels in your kidneys are damaged to the point that they cannot filter out waste properly. If left untreated, dialysis (a treatment to filter out waste products from the blood) or even a kidney transplant may be necessary. Eye problems. People with type 2 diabetes are at risk of several eye conditions, including diabetic retinopathy (which affects the blood vessels in the eye), glaucoma, and cataracts. If left untreated, these conditions can cause vision loss. Hypoglyce Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

You can help reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes by understanding your risk and making changes to your lifestyle. Common risk factors include increased weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride (blood fat) levels. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Here are some tips to help you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. Check your risk of diabetes. Take the Life! risk assessment test and learn more about your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A 12+ score indicates that you are at high risk and may be eligible for the Life! program - a free Victorian lifestyle modification program that helps you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or call 13 RISK (13 7475). Manage your weight. Excess body fat, particularly if stored around the abdomen, can increase the body’s resistance to the hormone insulin. This can lead to type 2 diabetes. Exercise regularly. Moderate physical activity on most days of the week helps manage weight, reduce blood glucose levels and may also improve blood pressure and cholesterol. Eat a balanced, healthy diet. Reduce the amount of fat in your diet, especially saturated and trans fats. Eat more fruit, vegetables and high-fibre foods. Cut back on salt. Limit takeaway and processed foods. ‘Convenience meals’ are usually high in salt, fat and kilojoules. It’s best to cook for yourself using fresh ingredients whenever possible. Limit your alcohol intake. Too much alcohol can lead to weight gain and may increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should have no more than two standard drinks a day and women should have no more than one. Quit smoking. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers. Control your blood pressure. Most people can do th Continue reading >>

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