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Can You Play Basketball With Diabetes

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

14 Winning Athletes With Diabetes

A few weeks ago, Kyle Love was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. This week he lost his job over the diagnosis. That’s the black and white truth. You could explain away the situation because Kyle Love happened to have been a defensive tackle for the New England Patriots. After the diagnosis he dropped 30 pounds off his 310 pound frame, thereby causing the team to cut him with a “non-football illness designation.” In plain English, Kyle Love was fired because he has diabetes. But he’s not alone, there are dozens of athletes with diabetes, many of them legendary. This week I am off on another journey with Team Diabetes. Over the past 5 years, I have raised more than $25 000 to help people living with diabetes, and pre-diabetes. The money I raise goes to research, support programs, and awareness. Awareness is the central point of what Team Diabetes is about. As we do our fundraising, we are telling everyone about diabetes, the importance of being active, and having a healthy diet. It’s too bad I couldn’t sit down with the New England Patriots and explain to them that athletes with diabetes is not a ‘firing offence.’ Bill Belichick, and the rest of the Patriots front office, the message you are sending to kids with diabetes is terrible. Instead of keeping an athlete who could act as a role model to tens of thousands of kids, you are cutting him loose – deeming him broken and worthless. Athletes with diabetes are not broken. It’s treatable, and manageable. In fact, Kyle Love has been managing his Type 2 diagnosis and is ready to ball this fall. Shame on you, Pats. Just check out this list of athletes with diabetes who went on to huge success. **UPDATE** The moment Love was put on waivers, the Jacksonsville Jaguars picked him up. Looks like I’ve got a new f Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Being An Athlete With Diabetes

What do Scott Verplank (5 time PGA tour winner), Jay Cutler (Quarterback for the Denver Broncos and the Chicago Bears), and Jackie Robinson (Brooklyn Dodgers) all have in common? Besides having achieved immense success in their sports career, they have also achieved a measure of success when managing their diabetes. Had they not managed their diabetes very well, it is safe to say that they would have not been at the top of their careers. Their performance would have been impeded by signs and symptoms of low or high blood sugar. When not performing at their best on a professional team, sportsmen can be fired for poor performance. So if an athlete is managing their diabetes, they should not be kept from playing professional or any kind of sports when they have the ability to do so. With all of their team mates counting on them, athletes with diabetes have a lot to think about, prepare for, and do, because of the added complexity that their diabetes brings to the playing field. There is a list of people in sports with diabetes on Wikipedia. Looking at the length of the list, it is clear that it is possible to succeed in just about any sport with diabetes. There are literally people with diabetes in every sport imaginable. There are people in football, baseball, basketball, canoe slalom, cricket, cycling, soccer, golf, ice hockey, and more. What does it take to be an athlete with diabetes? To be a successful athlete with diabetes, it is going to take some stellar self-management skills. The most important thing that an athlete with diabetes has to worry about is low blood sugars. With proper nutrition and strict control, you too can hit the ball out of the park, or reach the finish line, (all without episodes of hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). Hard work or low blood sugar? Continue reading >>

Diabetes Doesn't Have You - Lyfebulb

Diabetes Doesn't Have You - Lyfebulb

athlete , Basketball , camp , center , Chris Dudley , Chris Dudley Foundation , Cleveland Cavaliers , Diabetes , diabetic , diabetic athlete , exercise , Inspirational People , NBA , New Jersey Nets , New York Knicks , Pacific Northwest Diabetes Union , Phoenix Suns , Portland Trailblazers , professional , sports , t1d , team , test , Yale Chris Dudley played basketball in the NBA for 16 years. The Yale graduate gainednotoriety around the league as a voracious defender, energetic rebounder, andformidable shot blocker. He played Center as a member of the Cleveland Cavaliers,the New Jersey Nets, Portland Trail Blazers, New York Knicks, and the Phoenix Suns.Dudley was born in Connecticut, but grew up primarily in the San Diego area ofCalifornia where he started playing basketball. A bit of a late bloomer, Dudley playedJunior Varsity basketball through his junior year of high school when he was firstdiagnosed with diabetes at the age of 16. Committing to Yale University during hissenior year, Chris Dudley played for the Bulldogs from 1983 to 1987 beforebecoming the first ever Type-1 Diabetic to play in the NBA when we was drafted bythe Cleveland Cavaliers in the fourth round of the 1987 draft. Dudleys professional career achievements include playing in a total of 886 games,scoring 3,473 points, 375 assists, 1,027 blocked shots, and 5,457 rebounds.The NBArewarded Dudley with the J. Walter Kennedy Citizenship Award in 1996, and USAToday named him the Most Caring Athlete in 1997. I was fortunate enough to interview Chris Dudley about his experience playingbasketball as a type-1 diabetic. It was in his spring semester in 1981 after his sophomore year that Chris Dudleystarted to experience the classic symptoms of increased thirst and frequent trips to thebathroom. His close unc Continue reading >>

Flashback Friday: Adam Morrison Above The Rim With Basketball And Diabetes Control

Flashback Friday: Adam Morrison Above The Rim With Basketball And Diabetes Control

Flashback Friday: Adam Morrison Above the Rim With Basketball and Diabetes Control Adam Morrison, 22, is an NBA star that also has type 1 diabetes. He does not, however, have a horror story about his type 1 diagnosis that makes his ascension to NBA stardom seem like an in-your-face to an endocrinologists pessimistic predictions. His story does not rival the aspiring rock star or Olympic gymnast with type 1 who was told by their doom-and-gloom diagnosing physician, Youll never be a rock star/Olympic gymnast because of your type 1 diabetes! On the contrary, eight years ago, Morrisons endocrinologistDr. Ken Cathcart of Northside Internal Medicine in Spokane, Washingtontold Morrison at diagnosis that everything was going to be alright. For me, I was blessed with [Dr. Cathcart] who, from day one, said I can do whatever I wanted to as long as I take care of myself, says Morrison in a telephone interview with Diabetes Health. From the start, he let me know that if I took care of myself, I could play basketball. He never said, You have to place limitations on yourself. That positive reinforcement let me know that everything was going to be alright. I still have him as my endocrinologist today. Morrison was 14 at the time of his diagnosis, and his sites were firmly set on a future at the NCAA and pro basketball level. Despite being more disciplined than your typical 14 year old, Morrison admits that being told that he had type 1 was still overwhelming. You dont know the whole spectrum of diabetes when you are told that you have it, he says. Obviously, I was worried about a lot of things. You hear the horror stories about what can happen if you dont take care of your diabetes. Being as young as I was, that can put a lot of fear into you. If anything, being diagnosed with type 1 Continue reading >>

Children With Diabetes - Smart Pumps And Sports: To Wear The Pump Or Not?

Children With Diabetes - Smart Pumps And Sports: To Wear The Pump Or Not?

Smart Pumps and Sports: To Wear the Pump or Not? Athletes require intensive management of his or her diabetes to keep a balance of carbohydrates, insulin, and the effects that exercise causes during activity. The good news is an athlete on an insulin pump should already being practicing intensive management. Participating in sports on an insulin pump has many advantages over injection therapy but questions often come up on how to manage the pump during activity. The Sports Corner Column will feature different aspects of insulin pump therapy and sports participation. Through short concise articles one particular aspect of pump therapy will be discussed and its relationship to sports activity. This article will discuss the pros and cons to being connected to the pump or taking it off while participating in sports. Insulin pump therapy has been around for many years. The first insulin pump, as shown in figure 1, was the size of a backpack. As you may guess, wearing this pump would be difficult to participate in sports with any success. Today's pumps, as seen in figure 2, are much smaller and can be worn in many places on the body. Individuals wearing insulin pumps often wonder whether it is better to wear the pump during sports or take it off. As with many aspects of diabetes, it is up to the individual and health care team as long as certain guidelines are followed. Today's insulin pumps fit in the palm of your hand The health care team must be informed of any changes or ideas an athlete may have for disconnecting for sports. The general guidelines suggest to not having the pump off for more than an hour. The reason for this is the fast acting analogs used in pumps (Humalog, NovoLog, and soon to be Apidra) are processed more quickly which leave the body sooner as well ca Continue reading >>

Things Ive Learned From Playing Sports With Type 1 Diabetes

Things Ive Learned From Playing Sports With Type 1 Diabetes

Things Ive Learned from Playing Sports with Type 1 Diabetes Almost all of my fondest childhood memories come from playing organized or recreational or school sports, which I did with my type 1 diabetes for about 10 years. I think part of what makes those memories so wonderful and triumphant in my mind is the fact that I did it with diabetes and although many had no clue on earth how hard it was to balance, I did, and because I knew, I appreciated and loved every second I had on the field or court. Looking back on my kid self, Im kind of proud even, because there were times I felt the effort was not worth it. Recently, Reyna at Beta Buddies , whose son Joe has type 1 diabetes, wrote an amazing post that brought alot ofmy sentiments from playing sports back to life. I wanted to share the following for a long time for several reasons. A) I made some major mistakes I wouldnt want a young person to live through, B) I want to add to all the existing data out there that you can do it, you can do it, you can do it with type 1 diabetes, and C) I want young people to know that because of diabetes, you can do it better than others because you can use the fact that you have type 1 diabetes as extra motivation that others often lack. And believe me, motivation to do well takes you further than skill. -Playing with blood sugar over 250. I did this a lot because it felt so important at the time. Looking backI really wish I had been smarter. My parents were always checking on my blood sugar readings to make sure I could play but I would rig the meter by adding saliva to the stripwhich wasnt smart either. -Playing while feeling low. Sometimes Id feel just a little low and know that there would be only a few more minutes until half time or quarter or the end of the game. So Id stubbornl Continue reading >>

High School Basketball Player Adjusts To Life With Diabetes

High School Basketball Player Adjusts To Life With Diabetes

High school basketball player adjusts to life with diabetes Originally published February 5, 2018 at 1:01 am FOUNTAIN CITY, Ind. (AP) When Madi Clay was a sophomore at Northeastern High School, Princess Darnell took over as head coach and started a new tradition: team meals before away games. Clay was the most experienced player on a very young team, and her team relied on her to spend quite a few minutes on the court. On top of that, certain things she was eating during those team meals made her extra tired during games. It was all part of managing the life of a high school teen, rebuilding a basketball team, and adjusting to life as a diabetic. As a freshman, Clay found out she had Type 2 diabetes. Three years later, she says the obstacles shes faced have only made her stronger just like the growing pains of rebuilding Northeasterns girls basketball team. Clay is a member of the National Honors Society and with a 3.85 GPA, among the top students in her class. On the basketball court, shes helping turn around a girls basketball program that won just six games combined in the last two years, and has surpassed that total in this season, at 10-12 entering sectional play. Clay and Northeastern won a Wayne County tournament game for the first time in 19 years, and are right in the mix entering the girls basketball sectional tournament. I think right now, where me and my team are at right now, its a good spot, Clay said. Were trying better, theres little things weve talked about recently. Its just little things that we can piece together and we can do some big things. Every person with diabetes is different Clays diabetic diagnosis was a surprise, but it wasnt a shock. Her grandmother and her mother are both diabetic, so her mom raised them to watch what they ate. She would Continue reading >>

Nba.com: Chris Dudley Talks About Playing With Diabetes

Nba.com: Chris Dudley Talks About Playing With Diabetes

Chris Dudley Talks About Playing with Diabetes What was it was like at 16 years old to find out you had diabetes? I did not know much about diabetes, the first questions I had for the doctors were: Am I going to live? And, will I still be able to play basketball? I was obviously greatly relieved to hear a yes on both questions. What methods of detection were in place back then? When I first got diabetes in 1981, we went to the pharmacy and used something called Tes-Tape. This would check urine to determine if you had elevated blood sugar. Fortunately the technology improved right around this time, and the Glucometer was introduced. This tests your blood sugar levels with a pin prick of blood. How do they differ, if at all, from today? Todays meters are greatly improved from those of the early 1980s, sort of like the difference from todays cell phones to the first phones. For example, the early meters took a minute to get the results and today it takes 5 seconds big difference if you are trying to test your blood sugar during a 20 second timeout! What steps did you take to ensure that diabetes would not deter you from your goal of playing in the NBA? I took on the responsibility of making sure that having diabetes would not stop me from achieving my dream of playing in the NBA. This meant that I had to stay on top of my diabetes and my blood sugar levels. It certainly was not easy, I would test my blood sugar as much as 14x a day on game days, but it was worth it and I was proud to never have missed a game due to having diabetes. What was a typical day like playing basketball at Yale? At Yale, for academic reasons, the league games are played on Friday and Saturday nights and we would travel by bus. I tried to always eat at the same time to develop a routine, but it was Continue reading >>

Basketball, Football, And Diabetes

Basketball, Football, And Diabetes

Shaakira Hassell fights through her fear of a Type 1 diagnosis to continue to be an elite athlete and coach. Insulin Nation is featuring five profiles of female athletes with Type 1 diabetes who thrive at their sport. Each profile is excerpted from Judith Jones Ambrosinis book The Sisterhood of Diabetes: Facing Challenges and Living Dreams. When you are 511 and a competitive varsity basketball player, injuries are bound to be part of the game. Shaakira Hassells junior year at Beloit College was one of those stress-riddled times. In the fall of 1998, Shaakira ruptured her right Achilles tendon during practice and needed serious reconstructive surgery. During the period of recovery, she did some research and learned that Australia was one of the top countries emerging in the field of exercise science. It also had some of the top womens pro-basketball teams. After hearing this, Shaakira created an interdisciplinary sports-science major, including a study abroad program in Australia. During the summer before leaving for Australia, Shaakira began to feel fatigued all the time. She also experienced extreme thirst. She attributed it to the intensity of her power workouts. But during a physical exam, a urine analysis showed an unusually high level of ketones, a possible indicator of diabetes. This news called for major rebellion. Shaakira left the exam and bought a supersized bag of Sugar Babies, which she proceeded to munch her way through as she drove home. Over the next few days Shaakiras thirst became unbearable and her clothes seemed to hang off her. Worried, she went to see her primary physician, who took another urine sample and blood tests which showed a 540 blood sugar. The doctor was puzzled about what kind of diagnosis to give, as she felt Shaakira was too old to be Continue reading >>

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

If you’re an athlete who has Type-1 diabetes, you know how important it is to keep your blood sugar under excellent control. Blood sugar levels have a direct impact on strength, speed, stamina, flexibility and healing capabilities – all essential components of success in sport and fitness activities. There have been many athletes with diabetes who have excelled in their chosen sport (see athletes with diabetes list at bottom of page). But it isn’t without its challenges. Different forms of exercise can have very different effects on blood sugar, particularly when adrenal hormones start to kick in. Recovery from an exercise session may take blood sugar levels to strange and exotic places. What’s more, around-the-clock control is necessary for maintaining appropriate hydration and energy stores for athletic performance. Integrated Diabetes Services is led by one of the few certified diabetes educators who also happens to be a masters-level exercise physiologist. While not exactly a “world-class” athlete, Gary Scheiner participates and competes in a wide variety of sports and fitness activities. He served on the Board of Directors for the Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association for many years (now Insulindependence), and advises athletes and exercise enthusiasts with diabetes worldwide. In 2006 he received the Julie Betshart Award for the study of exercise and diabetes by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. He continues to speak nationally and internationally for both patients and healthcare professionals on exercise, diabetes and blood sugar control. Through his personal and professional experiences, Gary has helped athletes at all levels to incorporate new techniques for controlling blood sugar and enhancing athletic performance. He and his team of Continue reading >>

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

As a young diabetic, one of the most challenging adjustments to make after my diagnosis was figuring out how to continue participating in the sports that I had already been playing. Fortunately, by working with my parents and doctors, I was able to continue competing in the sports I loved. With advancements in diabetes management, this is now easier than ever. At one time, a type 1 diabetic person excelling in sports would have been unthinkable. Now, however, diabetes is a small side note in the story of many excellent athletes. With the advent and integration of health informatics into diabetes care, it is easier than ever for diabetic athletes to communicate with their healthcare team and figure out routines that work for them. Through the electronic collection, storage, and continuous analysis of blood sugar data, doctors and patients are now able to make more accurate, informed, and constant adjustments to management routines. This ability is a game changer for diabetic athletes, for whom precise blood sugar control is key. Moving forward, this will only continue to improve as healthcare technology continues to embrace the incredible rise of mobile technology, and patients have even greater abilities to communicate with their doctors. These improvements do not mean that being a world-class athlete as a diabetic is simple, or easy, however. By looking at some of the greatest type 1 diabetic athletes in history, all of us can learn a great deal from both their successes and hardships. It is also important for the diabetic community to celebrate the achievements of these athletes. Jay Cutler: American Football Jay Cutler has been the most notable recent diabetic athlete. This is because Cutler was already in the NFL at the time of his diagnosis, and is already one of t Continue reading >>

Flashback: Former Flower Mound Volleyball And Basketball Standout Lauren Cox Refused To Let Diabetes Stop Her

Flashback: Former Flower Mound Volleyball And Basketball Standout Lauren Cox Refused To Let Diabetes Stop Her

Flashback: Former Flower Mound volleyball and basketball standout Lauren Cox refused to let diabetes stop her Flower Mound's Lauren Cox (left) and Lovejoy's Sarah Langs hold their insulin pump as they pose for a portrait. Cox and Langs both have Type 1 diabetes. Contact Greg Riddle on Twitter: @DMNGregRiddle MURPHY Two of the state's premier high school athletes met for the first time two weeks ago, brought together for a photo shoot because of one of the many things they have in common. But as they stood in front of the camera, Flower Mound's Lauren Cox and Lovejoy's Sarah Langs weren't holding their All-America awards, Team USA jerseys or medals from international competition. They were showing the photographer their insulin pumps, which were the size of cellphones. And that got the two volleyball stars talking, as they discovered that they had used the same type of device to control their Type 1 diabetes. "I used to have that one," Cox said, looking at Langs' insulin pump as they compared the computerized apparatus that both must have at matches. Cox and Langs are among the approximately 1.25 million Americans who have Type 1 diabetes. Their bodies don't produce insulin like they should, and there is no cure for their disease. But both middle blockers earned all-state honors in 2014, and they were the only players from the Dallas area who were named preseason volleyball All-Americans by MaxPreps.com in 2015. "I think younger athletes need to know that they can play, too," Cox said. "Diabetes isn't going to affect how they play if they manage it and take care of it." In addition to managing her diet and insulin intake, Cox has to manage intense recruiting scrutiny. She is the nation's No. 1-ranked basketball recruit in the Class of 2016 and has had college coaches wa Continue reading >>

In The Spotlight: Sports And Type 1 Diabetes

In The Spotlight: Sports And Type 1 Diabetes

Sports used to be a big part of Jonathan Tengi’s life. The 14-year-old from Allendale, NJ, played soccer, basketball and baseball, and swam on a team during the summer. Then Jonathan was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. His active schedule came to a complete halt — he even missed the last soccer match of the season. Three weeks later, with his blood sugar levels under better control and a diabetes management plan in place, Jonathan was back in the game again, in time for basketball season. He was hitting his stride, learning to live with diabetes — something he says he couldn’t have done without his teammates. “Playing sports was a huge help physically and mentally, because when I was diagnosed, it threw everything off. Being able to get back into sports really helped me keep my mind off my diabetes and feel more normal,” he says. Diabetes experts agree: Physical activity is vital to staying healthy for all kids, including those with type 1 diabetes. Here’s why and what you need to know to even the playing field for your child. Strong Minds and Bodies Exercise helps kids concentrate in school. It’s good for their hearts, for building muscles, and for controlling weight and stress. The optimal amount of exercise for children with type 1 diabetes — about an hour per day — isn’t any different than for other children, says Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., an exercise physiologist and Professor of Exercise Science at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, VA. Improved Self-esteem “A chronic disease can have a negative influence on how children view themselves, but being physically active may help counteract that by increasing self-confidence,” Colberg says. Participating in team sports had an added bonus: It gave Jonathan a chance to educate his friends about his Continue reading >>

Playing Basketball - Diabetes And Sport

Playing Basketball - Diabetes And Sport

Basketball can be a very stop-start activity which can require careful management Basketball matches are technically quite short, with National Basketball Association (NBA) matches scheduled for 48 minutes across four quarters of 12 minutes. However, with fouls, timeouts, a 15-minute halftime and the ball going out-of-bounds, games can often last between two to two-and-a-half hours. As a result, the moderate intensity over a shorter period is altered by stoppages that can require relatively unique management of your diabetes. There are quite a few basketball players to note who have played professionally with type 1 diabetes, including Adam Morrison. Morrison won the 2006 Chevrolet Player of the Year award and two NBA championships playing for Los Angeles Lakers. Chris Dudley also played in the NBA, but is now retired, while Gary Forbes is currently a free agent having played for Denver Nuggets and Toronto Raptors. Managing diabetes when playing basketball Devising a routine is advised for regular basketball players, with a healthy meal and medication plan allowing for better control of your diabetes. This may require some trial and error in regard to insulin dosages at first, but basketball is a sport that can be quite easily managed once a routine has been established. Reducing your long lasting insulin is not essential for training or playing a game of basketball, however often you play. A routine of eating a balanced breakfast where you can accurately count carbohydrates and know how your body reacts is the best way to start a game day. This can also be applied to your lunch and tea, depending on what time you play. If you are eating within two-three hours of playing, it is advised to reduce your quick acting insulin dose with your meal prior to playing. [109] Howe Continue reading >>

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

Sports, Exercise, And Diabetes

People with diabetes can exercise and play sports at the same level as everyone else. But some don't. Take Olympic gold-medal swimmer Gary Hall Jr., for instance. He definitely doesn't swim like an average person. And pro golfers Kelli Kuehne and Michelle McGann don't putt like the folks at your local mini golf, either. All of these athletes deal with diabetes while wiping out the competition. Get the idea? Whether you want to go for the gold or just go hiking in your hometown, diabetes shouldn't hold you back. reduces your risk of heart disease and some types of cancer improves coordination, balance, strength, and endurance helps insulin work better in the body, which helps blood sugar levels stay in a healthy range burns calories, which helps you reach and stay at a healthy weight teaches you about teamwork, competition, and courage relieves tension and stress, relaxes you, and boosts your mood, too can even help you clear your mind and focus your attention better All exercise is great whether it's walking the dog or playing team sports. Just be sure to do it every day. Changing exercise habits can be hard for everyone at first. But most people say that once they start feeling the benefits, they're hooked. After that, it's a lot easier to keep going. But there are some facts you need to know about exercise and diabetes. The muscles need more energy during exercise, so the body releases extra sugar, or glucose . For people with diabetes, this can have some side effects. For example, if the body doesn't have enough insulin to use the glucose that's released during exercise, then the glucose stays in the blood, which leads to high blood sugar levels. This is called hyperglycemia (pronounced: hy-pur-gly-SEE-mee-uh). Not having enough insulin to use the sugar in the blood Continue reading >>

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