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Can You Live Without A Pancreas And Gallbladder

Seven Body Organs You Can Livewithout

Seven Body Organs You Can Livewithout

Director of the Clinical Anatomy Learning Centre & Senior Lecturer in Anatomy, Lancaster University Adam Taylor is affiliated with the Anatomical Society. Republish our articles for free, online or in print, under Creative Commons license. The human body is incredibly resilient. When you donate a pint of blood, you lose about 3.5 trillion red blood cells, but your body quickly replaces them. You can even lose large chunks of vital organs and live. For example, people can live relatively normal lives with just half a brain ). Other organs can be removed in their entirety without having too much impact on your life. Here are some of the non-vital organs. This organ sits on the left side of the abdomen, towards the back under the ribs. It is most commonly removed as a result of injury . Because it sits close the ribs, it is vulnerable to abdominal trauma. It is enclosed by a tissue paper-like capsule, which easily tears, allowing blood to leak from the damaged spleen. If not diagnosed and treated, it will result in death. When you look inside the spleen, it has two notable colours. A dark red colour and small pockets of white. These link to the functions . The red is involved in storing and recycling red blood cells, while the white is linked to storage of white cells and platelets. You can comfortably live without a spleen. This is because the liver plays a role in recycling red blood cells and their components. Similarly, other lymphoid tissues in the body help with the immune function of the spleen. The stomach performs four main functions: mechanical digestion by contracting to smash up food, chemical digestion by releasing acid to help chemically break up food, and then absorption and secretion. The stomach is sometimes surgically removed as a result of cancer or tra Continue reading >>

Life After Pancreatic Surgery | Upmc Healthbeat

Life After Pancreatic Surgery | Upmc Healthbeat

Surgery to treat pancreatic cancer can remove cancerous tumors and has the potential to extend life. At the same time, undergoing pancreatic surgery can be challenging. Even minimally invasive surgery still involves an operation, recovery time, and a hospital stay. Although most people wont experience major complications after these procedures, the experience can affect the way you live, at least while you recover. Heres what you can expect following your operation. The most common type of pancreatic surgery is called Whipple surgery . During this procedure, your surgeon will remove the head, or right-hand portion, of the pancreas , where most tumors occur. Because of the location of this organ, he or she must also remove: A new, less-invasive form of Whipple surgery uses a robotic device to more accurately guide surgical instruments in the abdomen. Whatever type of pancreatic surgery you have, youll experience some changes to your health and routine afterward. RELATED: What Do Intestines Do for the Body? Most post-surgical complications arent life-threatening, but they still require close observation from your health care team. The most frequent complication from pancreatic surgery is leaking of pancreatic juices from the incision. You may also experience bleeding or an infection of the surgical site. For these reasons, your doctor will recommend that you remain in the hospital for four to 10 days, depending on the type of surgery youve had. While in the hospital, youll be given medications to help ease the pain of surgery. Youve just had major surgery on many of the organs that make up your digestive system. So, it stands to reason that youll experience some changes to digestion. Following surgery, you will initially only be able to eat small amounts of food. You may Continue reading >>

Living Without A Pancreas: Lifestyle And Side Effects | Iytmed.com

Living Without A Pancreas: Lifestyle And Side Effects | Iytmed.com

Located between the stomach and other organs, consisting of the liver, spleen, and small intestine, the pancreas is an abdominal organ of about 6 inches in length that helps control blood glucose and improve digestion. Diabetes, pancreatic cancer, and pancreatitis are three diseases connected with the pancreas that may need its surgical elimination. How will your life change when you have your pancreas removed? Lets find out more. Yes, you can live without a pancreas. You will need to pay attention to numerous things however. The pancreas secretes insulin to manage blood sugar level levels and releases gastrointestinal enzymes also. In the absence of your pancreas, you will need to take medications to change these functions. You may need to take oral pancreatic enzymes and insulin injections for this. Side Effects of Living Without a Pancreas It is also vital to understand that the total pancreas is hardly ever removed through surgery, but it is more common to have a pancreas that does not function appropriately. If you have Type 1 diabetes, it implies your pancreas still produces digestive enzymes but is incapable of making insulin. Nevertheless, even when part of the pancreas is gotten rid of, the continuing to be pancreas generally does not work efficiently to produce adequate enzymes or insulin. Some people go for synthetic replacement, but this normally is not as efficient as a healthy pancreas. You can still attempt ways and make lifestyle changes to live an active life even with pancreatic insufficiency. Can you live without a pancreas? Yes, but you need to follow particular steps and make modifications to your lifestyle to live an active life. It is important to take your enzymes without fail when you are handling pancreatic deficiency. Without enough enzymes, Continue reading >>

Organs We Can Live Without

Organs We Can Live Without

Our bodies are miraculous machines comprised of bones, cartilage, arteries, veins, nerves, tissue and organs. Everything works together to keep us in optimal health. Yet, like machines, sometimes our bodies break down. If an organ fails, removal might be an option. Here are some of the organs that we can give up: The uterus or womb is the organ where the fetus matures during pregnancy. It is present when a female is born but not mature until puberty, when menstruation begins. Ovaries are independent organs with their own blood supply. The most common diseases of the uterus are fibroids, benign muscle growths within the uterus wall; endometriosis, when endometrial tissue grows outside the uterus causing bleeding and pain; and endometrial cancer, according to Dr. Gerald Harkins, medical director of minimally invasive gynecological surgery at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. Removal of the uterus is called a hysterectomy, which is one of the most common surgeries in the U.S. today. Most hysterectomies are done laproscopically, with the option to keep the cervix, Harkins says. Removal of the uterus does not necessarily include removal of the ovaries. Without a uterus, a woman cannot physically deliver a child nor will she menstruate. However, women who have had a hysterectomy but whose ovaries have not been removed and who desire children can donate their eggs to a surrogate. Removal of the uterus doesnt affect a womans hormonal status if her ovaries are not removed. The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recommends that women up to age 65 keep their ovaries at surgery, and research shows that women with ovaries have improved longevity. Kidneys are bean-shaped paired organs, located in the retroperitoneal space with one on each side of the spine. Mos Continue reading >>

Can You Live Without A Pancreas?

Can You Live Without A Pancreas?

Please visit the new WebMD Message Boards to find answers and get support. Yes. The pancreas has two main functions: secretion of insulin, which controls blood sugar levels, and secretion of digestive enzymes and hormones. Although not a perfect solution, these functions can be replaced through insulin injections and oral pancreatic enzymes with meals. Surgery to remove the pancreas completely is rarely done, so very few people have no pancreas at all. Much more common is having a pancreas that doesnt work properly. In people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin but continues to make digestive enzymes. In cystic fibrosis and chronic pancreatitis, both insulin and enzyme production are often impaired. After surgery to remove part of the pancreas (such as for pancreatic cancer), in some cases the remaining pancreas cant make enough insulin, enzymes, or both. People with diabetes are at higher risk for heart attacks and strokes, and low pancreatic enzymes can lead to vitamin deficiencies. Artificial replacement doesnt work as well as a healthy pancreas, but it allows many people with pancreatic insufficiency to live full, active lives. Important: The opinions expressed in WebMD User-generated content areas like communities, reviews, ratings, blogs, or WebMD Answers are solely those of the User, who may or may not have medical or scientific training. These opinions do not represent the opinions of WebMD. User-generated content areas are not reviewed by a WebMD physician or any member of the WebMD editorial staff for accuracy, balance, objectivity, or any other reason except for compliance with our Terms and Conditions. Some of these opinions may contain information about treatments or uses of drug products that have not been approved by the U.S. Food and Continue reading >>

What Makes Pancreatic Cancer So Deadly?

What Makes Pancreatic Cancer So Deadly?

Last week, NFL great Gene Upshaw passed away suddenly from pancreatic cancer. Oncologist Allyson Ocean explains how the illness felled Upshaw only four days after doctors found it Gene Upshaw , the executive director of the National Football League Player's Association —the union for NFL players—died late Wednesday evening of pancreatic cancer while vacationing in California's Lake Tahoe. Doctors diagnosed the 63-year-old Hall of Fame offensive lineman with the disease just four days earlier. Upshaw was a guard for the Oakland Raiders from 1967 to 1981. He played in seven Pro Bowls and three Super Bowls. He served as head of the NFL player's union for 25 years. According to Bloomberg News , Upshaw's wife, Terri, took him to a hospital on Sunday, August 17th, because he was having trouble breathing. A biopsy revealed, much to everyone's surprise, that he had advanced pancreatic cancer. In March, actor Patrick Swayze —star of the hit 1980s film Dirty Dancing—revealed he had been diagnosed with the illness in January. Doctors' reports indicated they had caught his cancer relatively early. The pancreas secretes hormones and enzymes to digest our fats. One of those hormones is insulin, which prompts the body to use sugar in the blood rather than fat as energy. Its levels are low in diabetic patients, who suffer from abnormally high blood sugar. Only one fifth of Americans diagnosed with pancreatic cancer survive for a full year, according to the American Cancer Society , and it is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the country. How does the disease develop without noticeable symptoms and then kill so quickly? To find out, ScientificAmerican.com called Allyson Ocean , an oncologist at New York–Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, who special Continue reading >>

Living Without A Pancreas: Is It Possible?

Living Without A Pancreas: Is It Possible?

Living without a pancreas: Is it possible? Adjusting to life without a pancreas can seem daunting at first, but most patients adjust remarkably well. Located deep in the abdomen, the pancreas is a vital part of the digestive system and a critical controller of blood sugar levels, releasing the hormones insulin and glucagon into the bloodstream to help control how the body uses food for energy. Given the importance of the pancreas as an organ, you might think living without one is impossible like trying to live without a heart. But you can in fact live without a pancreas. Thanks to advancements in Medicine and the technology with which to administer it, we can now more effectively than ever reproduce what the pancreas does when it becomes necessary to remove all or part of the organ because of pancreatic cancer or other pancreatic diseases . Partial pancreatectomy, or only removing part of the pancreas, is much more common than a total pancreatectomy, or removing the entire pancreas. Total pancreatectomy is most commonly performed for patients who have a so called field-defect that places their entire gland at risk for developing cancer. This occurs rarely, but some genetic conditions or pre-cancerous lesions can require such an operation. Thus it is important for at-risk patients to know their options and ask their physician if they qualify for either a partial or total pancreatectomy. So how do you live without a pancreas or only a partial one? The short answer is medications, lifestyle changes, and in rare cases, transplantation of the hormone-producing pancreatic cells. In addition to regulating blood sugar levels, the pancreas secretes powerful enzymes into the intestines to help break down fatty foods so our bodies can use the nutrients. For the most part, we can Continue reading >>

Can You Live Without A Pancreas?

Can You Live Without A Pancreas?

You can live without a pancreas, although you would need to take medication for the rest of your life to compensate for the important functions that the pancreas performs. Although most peoplehave very little idea of where the pancreas is in the body, let alone what it does, it is still considered one of the bodys major organs. However, as with every other organ in the body, things can happen to the pancreas, which may cause it to stop working or require removal. The question is, can you survive without your pancreas? And if so, how would it change your life? The pancreas is a gland organ located in the abdominal cavity, behind the stomach, and is roughly 6 inches long. While few people give their pancreas much thought, it performs a few critical roles within the body. First and foremost, the pancreas helps in the digestion of food, as it can release enzymes from its exocrine cells that are required to break down particular types of food. These specialized enzymes include amylase and lipase, which help to metabolize carbohydrates and fats, respectively, as well as trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are needed to break down carbohydrates. Without proper digestion from these additional gastric juices, less nutrients would be available to the body. Secondly, the pancreas creates a very important hormone in its endocrine cells insulin. As many of you likely know, insulin is the hormone that regulates blood sugar levels in the body. By creating insulin and releasing it into the bloodstream when necessary, the pancreas controls the glucose being used in the body, and can prevent the onset of diabetes. In both types of diabetes, the pancreas is affected, either due to beta cells in the pancreas being destroyed (and thus, being unable to produce insulin), or through the bodys ina Continue reading >>

Life After Removal Of Pancreas, Gall Bladder, Spleen? Anyone Out There Please?

Life After Removal Of Pancreas, Gall Bladder, Spleen? Anyone Out There Please?

Hi loulou: I'm fearful I might have the same fate only different C What is renal cell C in the pancrea?? I have to say I woul;d love to keep in touch. I hope I will be eligible for the op your having, I know that might sound crazy but what is the alternative?? What state do you live in and what happened?/ I mean how did the symptoms start and what tests did thy do to give you this diagnosis?? Sincerely, Denise My email is you have to put in the at sign @ in the middle of 430 and hotmail I dont know if they allow you to post your email so I did it this way!! Please write....... ***this post is edited by moderator *** *** private e-mails not allowed ** Please read our Terms of Use Hi I had my pancreas, spleen & gallbladder out as well (also part of my bile duct & small intestine.) I am 2 1/2 yrs out of the surgery. I am Type 1 diabetic and that isn't easy but its become much easier since the pump/ I take great care of myself, have 2 young boys, exercise everyday, very active in all my kids activities and have full, good life. It takes determination and a VERY positive attitude. Choose to live and surround yourself with uplifting people. We all have crosses to bear and we choose how we carry them through life. Feel free to contact me anytime for support. It really helps Good luck!! Eileen Guest over a year ago Hi My friend is going to have her pancreas remove (total pancreatectomy), from your experience what should be prepared for the recovery period at home? Do you think we should get her professional help or can we nurse her ourselves? How long is the recovery? Hello! : ) I have had all three organs removed. In Jan 2007 I had my gallbladder out. My problem was I kept getting pancreatitis. I have had it since i was in 6th grade. The attacks stopped for awhile and then whe Continue reading >>

10 Organs You Can Live Without | Scienceabc

10 Organs You Can Live Without | Scienceabc

Now lets try and understand their function and why is it possible to live without them!! Its a part of the immune system that checks the blood for contamination and also clears the blood in the oldred blood cells. Cancer or immunological diseases may require that the spleen be removed. In that case, other organs, like the liver, will take up the important task. However, while it is possible to live without a spleen, that person will be more prone to infections. Therefore, vaccines are regularly used to protect against thoserisks. We are all aware of this bean-shaped organ, a pair of which is present in our body. The kidney acts as a filter to keep the blood free of impurities. Not everyone isborn with two kidneys. Some have to give one up due to disease, while some other people donate one of their kidneys to those who need one. In other words, its pretty normal to live with one kidney. Believe it or not, its possible to live with no kidneys at all! That requires a person to regularly undergo dialysis, which purifies the blood with the aid of a machine. This organ aids in digestion by secreting bile juices. Sometimes the substances in the bile crystallize to form stones, commonly known as gallstones. Most of the time, these stones cause no harm, but if they block a duct in the gall bladder, it can cause intense pain. Worsening of the situation will requiresurgical removal of the gall bladder. In the absence of the organ, the liver pushes the bile directly to the intestines. However, if you enjoy a balanced diet with a lot of fibre, you can easily live a normal, healthy life, even without this organ! Yes, dont be too surprised.That entire stomach of yours can be removed surgically. This is most commonly done for those people who have been struck bystomach cancer. The foo Continue reading >>

Woman's Radical Procedure Transforms Liver Into Super Organ

Woman's Radical Procedure Transforms Liver Into Super Organ

Food started to bother Allison Sarver when she was 18 years old, giving her attacks of nausea and pain after meals. By the time she was 24, she would sneak out of her office after lunch to lie down in her car until the attacks passed. By the end of that year, she was no longer able to eat or drink anything and had to rely on intravenous feeding to survive. After years of alternately ignoring the symptoms and getting misdiagnosed with ailments such as irritable bowel syndrome, a doctor in Philadelphia finally told Sarver she had chronic pancreatitis, meaning her pancreas -- the organ that produces insulin and other enzymes necessary for digestion -- had become scarred and enflamed. Unable to eat without pain, Sarver lost 30 pounds in two months and was found to be deficient in vitamins A, B, D and E. While grateful for a diagnosis, getting treatment for her pancreatitis remained another matter. "I was told, 'If we can't help you, no one else can help you,'" she said, referring to her team of doctors. "I thought, 'There has to be a place that does [treats] this.'" An Internet search led Sarver to the pancreas clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, which specialized in pancreatitis. They had been performing a surgery on some of their patients that involved removing the entire pancreas, extracting its insulin-producing cells -- called islets -- and moving them to the patient's liver. The liver would then take over the job of producing insulin to regulate blood glucose levels, and the patient would take enzyme pills to fulfill the pancreas's remaining jobs, which include aiding in the digestion of fats, carbohydrates and protein. In April 2012, when Sarver first started seeing the Hopkins doctors, she couldn't imagine having her entire pancreas removed. It was just t Continue reading >>

All Can You Live Without A Portion Of Your Pancreas? Messages

All Can You Live Without A Portion Of Your Pancreas? Messages

Can you live without a portion of your pancreas? I have a dear friend who was just diagnosed with pancreatic cancer today. He has not even spoken to the oncologist to find out what they will do going forward. Apparently his lymph nodes are clear. I was wondering if they could remove most of the tumor and his pancreas, followed with traditional chemo and/or radiation therapy and look forward to a long life afterward. He is 48. Does anyone know of at least one case of this or am I being too optomistic? RE: Can you live without a portion of your pancreas? by PingPong_Ball on Fri Jan 25, 2008 12:00 AM Yes, I'm alive. My pancreasis now calling a medical waste landfill in New Jersey home as it was removed last October. Before I was totally gutted like a fish, 75% of it was removed in August. With only 25% of a pancreas, my body still produced some insulin & digestive enzymes. A total pancdretomy (I alwaysmisspell this word to the point my spell check won't even give me suggestions) will live your frienda diabetic andhis body will no longer produce digestive enzymes. This means he'll need to be careful ofhis diet,will beinsulin dependant, and will need to take digestive enzyme pills whenhe eats.A personcan return to a somewhat normal life style ifthey eat right, exercise, and take care of themselves. A strong network of support also helps, so your pal is lucky to have you as a friend. The healing process from a total pancdretomy can be painful. For example, it can take a few months for one's body to remember that food should go down into the stomach instead of coming back up. Delayed Gastric emptying is no fun! I made it a game called Will It Stay Down? As a friend, one of the worst things you can doit give your buddy tips on how to eat if he experiences delayed gastric empty Continue reading >>

Can You Live Without A Pancreas? What You Need To Know

Can You Live Without A Pancreas? What You Need To Know

While it is possible to live without a pancreas, doctors only recommend removing a pancreas when a person has a serious medical condition such as severe recurrent pancreatitis or pancreatic cancer. In most cases, medical treatments can take the place of the pancreas, but people living without a pancreas require diligent monitoring and medical care. Removal of the pancreas also means a person will have to make a variety of lifestyle changes that can be tough to adjust to. Contents of this article: Can you live without a pancreas? The pancreas is a gland that secretes hormones that a person needs to survive, including insulin. Decades ago, serious problems with the pancreas were almost always fatal. Now, it is possible for people to live without a pancreas. Surgery to remove the pancreas is called pancreatectomy. The surgery can be partial, removing only the diseased portion of the pancreas, or a surgeon may remove the entire pancreas. A complete pancreatectomy that removes the entire pancreas also requires the removal of parts of the stomach, a portion of the small intestine called the duodenum, and the end of the bile duct. The gallbladder and the spleen may be removed as well. This extensive surgery can be dangerous and life-changing. After a pancreatectomy, a person will develop diabetes. They need to change their diet and lifestyle and will have to take insulin for the rest of their lives. People who cannot produce enough insulin develop diabetes, which is why removing the pancreas automatically triggers the condition. Removing the pancreas can also reduce the body's ability to absorb nutrients from food. Without artificial insulin injections and digestive enzymes, a person without a pancreas cannot survive. One 2016 study found that about three-quarters of people wi Continue reading >>

Faqs About Pancreatitis

Faqs About Pancreatitis

Diet Am I allowed to drink alcohol once I have been diagnosed with pancreatitis? If pancreatitis was caused by excess alcohol use, you should abstain from alcohol. If other causes of acute pancreatitis have been addressed and resolved (such as via gallbladder removal) and the pancreas returned to normal, you should be able to lead a normal life, but alcohol should still be taken only in moderation (maximum of 1 serving/day). In chronic pancreatitis, there is ongoing inflammation and malabsorption — patients gradually lose digestive function and eventually lose insulin function — so regular use of alcohol is unwise. What kind of diet is recommended to avoid flareups of pancreatitits? In chronic pancreatitis, the pancreas gradually loses its ability to function properly, and endocrine function will eventually be lost. This puts patients at risk of type 1 diabetes. Patients should avoid refined sugars and simple carbohydrates, and instead consume complex carbohydrates and whole grains. High protein, moderate fat balanced diets are best in general. Why is it that sometimes I can eat certain foods and other times those same foods cause problems? Many people experience this phenomenon, although it is not well understood and there is no clear answer. It is important to remember to regularly take pancreatic enzymatic supplements to be sure a lack of enzymes is not the cause. Do I have to take my pancreatic enzymes even if I'm feeling good? Yes. As the function of the pancreas decreases , it is important to have the enzymes for nutrition. In addition, your doctors will often prescribe the enzymes to avoid stimulation of the pancreas and therefore pain. The pancreas is stimulated to release pancreatic enzymes when there is undigested food in the intestine. The enzymes start p Continue reading >>

Can You Live Without A Pancreas?

Can You Live Without A Pancreas?

Medically reviewed by Graham Rogers, MD on April 12, 2017 Written by Stephanie Watson Yes, you can live without a pancreas. You will need to make a few adjustments to your life, though. Your pancreas makes substances that control your blood sugar and help your body digest foods. After surgery, youll have to take medicines to handle these functions. Surgery to remove the whole pancreas is rarely done anymore . However, you might need this surgery if you have pancreatic cancer, severe pancreatitis, or damage to your pancreas from an injury. Thanks to new medicines, life expectancy after pancreas removal surgery is rising. Your outlook will depend on the condition you have. One study found that the seven-year survival rate after surgery for people with noncancerous conditions like pancreatitis was 76 percent. But for people with pancreatic cancer, the seven-year survival rate was 31 percent. The pancreas is a gland located in your abdomen, underneath your stomach. Its shaped like a large tadpole, with a round head and a thinner, tapered body. The head is curved into the duodenum, the first part of your small intestine. The body of the pancreas sits between your stomach and spine. The pancreas has two kinds of cells. Each type of cell produces a different substance. Endocrine cells produce the hormones insulin and glucagon. Insulin helps lower blood sugar, and glucagon raises blood sugar. Exocrine cells produce enzymes that help digest food in the intestine. Trypsin and chymotrypsin break down proteins. Amylase digests carbohydrates, and lipase breaks down fats. Diseases that might require pancreas removal surgery include: Chronic pancreatitis : This is inflammation in the pancreas that gets worse over time. Surgery is sometimes done to relieve pancreatitis pain. Pancreati Continue reading >>

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