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Can You Join The Military With Type 1 Diabetes

Petition Allow Diabetics To Serve In Non-combat Positions In The Military Change.org

Petition Allow Diabetics To Serve In Non-combat Positions In The Military Change.org

Megan Grassel started this petition to U.S Department of Defense and 1 other My daughter was diagnosed with Type 1 Juvenile Diabetes in September 2011. Not only myself, but everyone was telling her that she can live a healthy normal life with diabetes. She was told that she can do and be whatever she wants to and nothing will stop her. But when she was thinking about the things she would like to do and be when she is older, she mentioned the military.... but this is the one thing she can't do. But if we all join together, maybe this is one thing that we can change for all diabetics that have a dream to be in the military without lying and hiding a manageable disease. I absolutely agree that someone with a medical condition should NOT be put in a position that has another persons life on the line. Someone that has a medical condition should not be deployed, and I believe should not be put in a combat situation. My thought on it, was why cant someone with diabetes hold down the fort sort of speak. Why not have a job passing out the paychecks on base? Or have a job as a nurse that stays on base in the United States? Why not work a position that is just stationed here in America? This will give Americans that are lucky enough to not have a medical condition to fight for their country. This will give our country more people to fight for their country, while others are doing what they can back at home to support our troops. You dont have to agree with my beliefs, and that is the beautiful thing about this country, that we have the right to voice our opinions. Here is a fantastic link from a man that was deployed in Iraq and managed his Type 1 diabetes. Why couldn'tsomeone with Diabetes join theFinance Corps in the Army?? The Finance CorpsMission Statement:The Finance Corps' Continue reading >>

Can You Join The Military With Diabetes?

Can You Join The Military With Diabetes?

You are here: Home Military Recruiting Can you Join the Military with Diabetes? Joining the military is a very noble and patriotic thing to do. Fighting to preserve the freedom of this great country is something many want to do, but can you join the military with diabetes? Questions around military recruiting and diabetes have been asked for many years. There are multiple types of diabetes and even pre-diabetes to consider. If youre considering joining the military , but youre afraid because of diabetes, heres the information you seek. If you have pre-diabetes, Type 1, Type 1.5 or Type 2 diabetes, its not as easy as simply joining the military. Questions may come up about your diabetic condition and even though it may seem discriminatory for the military to tell someone they cannot serve due to this condition, the military is known for rejecting people due to health issues. Before we start to get too worried, its important to look at how military recruiting and diabetes relate. Its also important to look at what could happen if youre diagnosed with diabetes as a member of the military. Why Should Diabetes Be a Problem in the Military? Looking at the reality of the situation will help to show why diabetes presents a problem for military members. Imagine you have been sent overseas to somewhere in the Middle East. Its hot, you only get MREs (meals ready to eat) for meals and you may have to go long periods without eating. MREs consist mainly of carbohydrates and the heat makes it very difficult to keep your insulin from being exposed to extremely high temperatures. With your unit constantly moving, you getting very little sleep and the high stress situations, this type of work could become very dangerous to your health. If youre in this type of situation and you live wit Continue reading >>

Diabetessisters

Diabetessisters

In these times of tight job markets and high health care costs people frequently look to the Federal Government for jobs and health benefits. Unfortunately not all parts of the Federal Government welcome people with diabetes. Some do not hire and some will not retrain people with diabetes. The health insurance programs have no limit on coverage for pre-existing conditions and most options have a limit for out-of-pocket catastrophic costs in one year. By definition the health plans available to Federal Employees cannot ever be considered gold-plated programs that would be taxed under the new health care insurance reform law. The Federal Rehabilitation Act implements the Americans with Disabilities Act for Federal Employees. So there are many protections in place for people with disabilities for hiring and retention processes. However, in some situations, for some disabilities, including diabetes, the federal government has decided that people with disabilities cannot be accommodated. Civil Service.For most Civil Service positions the Federal Government has plans for actively recruiting people with disabilities. People with disabilities, including diabetes, are recruited and provided accommodations once on-board. Accommodation include such things as designated break times, refrigerators to store medication, and flexible work hours. Sometimes people have to work at receiving these accommodations but they eventually are provided. For most positions, prospective employees are not required to take a physical or show fitness for work. Congress has authorized drug testing of employees but it is not generally required. One exception to these liberal civil service rules and policies are law enforcement positions, such as air marshal, court protection programs, and FBI special ag Continue reading >>

Medical Conditions Normally Not Waiverable Pg-21

Medical Conditions Normally Not Waiverable Pg-21

There are no waivers for any form of bariatric surgery. For a history of myocarditis you will need clearance from your cardiologist, including an echocardiogram, stating that you have been free of symptoms, off all treatment for at least one year, and have no residual problems. Hi I was PDQ last July for a psychotherapeutic treatment from Oct 14, 2011 due to inattention, poor concentration and mild anxiety symptoms due to academic workload, I started on Focalin x12 20 mg to improve attention and psychotherapy to improve studying skills + self confidence. Improvement was very fast and by Jan 24, 2012 I was using the medication prn. Since then I only took 3 Focalin x12 10mg in a period of 3 months, so medication was discontinued. I have a total of 5 appointments and since April 2012 was not use Focalin. I was discharged on Jun 19, 2012. Since then in the last evaluation I was on total remission of condition and not taking any kind of pharmacologic or psychotherapeutic treatment. Im 26, about to graduate from Electrical Engineering with a good standing academic status and with no previous psychiatric treatment and no childhood history of ADHD. Do I have a chance for a waiver in the NAVY? Someone told me I dont have a chance for a waiver or a good security clarence and I want to be sure before going to MEPS again and I want to know what to expect. The fact that you had both ADD and anxiety makes waiver unlikely until you have been off all treatment for a minimum of 2 years with no decline in performance. I have been DQed due to a lattice degeneration found during a consultation. My recruiter said there is nothing for me to do except sit tight and wait for the waiver but I am not feeling good about my odds. Is it correct that there is nothing for me to do unless they take a Continue reading >>

Military Service And Diabetes

Military Service And Diabetes

Join the fight against diabetes on Facebook There are few things more disappointing to a potential military recruit than to find out that they have diabetes and cannot sign up. As one can imagine, military members need to be strong, healthy and free from any disability that would require attention while in the field. The equipment they carry into battle cannot include needles and insulin. When someone makes the decision to join a branch of the military, they are subject to a battery of tests for aptitude, intelligence and strength. They also receive a full medical evaluation. It is here that recruits sometimes learn for the first time that they are pre-diabetic or diabetic. While a diagnosis of diabetes requiring treatment is an automatic disqualification from enlistment, being pre-diabetic does not automatically rule out service in the military. Doctors will consult with the potential recruit to educate them on the changes they need to make in order to reduce their risk. They might ask them to institute their changes for a period of time - six months or a year - and then come back and re-apply. Assuming that they have improved their A1c numbers and are not in need of treatment, they could then be eligible to enlist. Some may feel the exclusion of persons with diabetes from service in the military is discriminatory. Unfortunately, federal anti-discrimination laws don't apply to the military. For those already serving in the military who receive a diagnosis of pre-diabetes or diabetes, separation from the service is not necessarily a given. Those service members who cannot achieve and maintain an A1c of 7.0 or below are referred to a medical evaluation board, which assesses their overall fitness and makes recommendations about further care. The military takes very serio Continue reading >>

Employment Discrimination & Your Rights

Employment Discrimination & Your Rights

What is Diabetes Canada’s position on employment? Diabetes Canada believes that a person with diabetes should be eligible for employment in any occupation for which he or she is individually qualified. In being considered for employment in safety-sensitive positions, a person with diabetes has the right to be assessed for specific job duties on his or her own merits based on reasonable standards applied consistently. Employers have the duty to accommodate employees with diabetes unless the employer can show it to cause undue hardship to the organization. Read the Diabetes Canada's full position statement on employment, including background and rationale. What is workplace discrimination for people living with diabetes? Discrimination can come in many forms. It is possible that an employer may refuse to hire you after an employment medical, limit your job responsibilities or promotions, or fire you. Sometimes an employer might simply not bother to find out what diabetes really involves and take the easy option of employing someone they don’t see as a risk. Examples of discrimination in the workplace: You inquire about applying to be an officer with the city police department and are told they do not hire people with diabetes. After experiencing a hypoglycemic reaction at your workplace, you are terminated from your job. Despite requesting a regularly scheduled morning coffee break to test your blood glucose and eat a snack, your employer makes you work through until lunchtime. After the employment medical, your job offer is rescinded because your have type 1 diabetes. “We do not hire people with diabetes.” “People with diabetes do not meet the medical requirements for this job.” “People with diabetes using insulin are unfit for employment in this job.” It Continue reading >>

Can You Serve In The Military With Diabetes?

Can You Serve In The Military With Diabetes?

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. As we approach Memorial Day and recognize those serving ourcountry, we thought it would be worthwhile to look at the ease with whichpeople with diabetes are able to serve in the military, and how that's changedthrough the years. Sadly, the picture isn'tas optimistic as we would have hoped. While access to militaryservice for PWDs has gotten a little better over time, not much has changed andit remains mostly hit-or-miss when it comes to someone being able to servedespite their condition. The American DiabetesAssociation's legal advocacy director, Katie Hathaway,says it's pretty much "a mixed bag" and military service is off limits for most PWDs. It comes down toan individual being able to educate a military medical panel that he or she canstill serve despite their diagnosis, often battling the same misconceptions andperceptions that plague those of us on the civilian side. Our battle is theirbattle, and the war spills into all ranks and military branches, apparently. Of course, we have totalk types here. Really, we're only talking about those PWDs already diagnosedwith type 1 or dependent on insulin at the time they wish to enter themilitary. The possibility of service pretty much becomes a non sequitur whenyou're living with a pre-existing condition. Growing up, I was toldspecifically as long as I could remember that serving in the military wasn'tpossible thanks to my type 1 diabetes. So that killed any thought of followingin the footsteps of my maternal grandfather who served in World World II. Iwouldn't describe it as a "dream" of mine to serve, but if I'd hadthe chance I might have explored it as a possible path. Sa Continue reading >>

Good News For Type 1 Diabetes

Good News For Type 1 Diabetes

There are two completely different diseases that cause a high blood sugar. We call them Type I diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. Because it usually begins during childhood, type 1 is also called juvenile onset or childhood onset diabetes (although adults can get it). Type 2 is called adult onset because it usually begins in adults, although today more and more young people are coming down with this form of diabetes. Type 1 is sometimes called insulin dependent diabetes because it requires insulin injections. Type 2 is sometimes called non-insulin dependent diabetes because it is often treated with oral medications; although Type 2s can often end up on high doses of insulin-much higher than Type 1s. It may be confusing to still hear all these different names being used, but the scientific community has now accepted Type 1 and Type 2 as the correct terminology for these two diabetic diseases. Some Good News for Type 1 Diabetics! Type 1 diabetes is a disease where there is no insulin available. The beta cells in the pancreas have been destroyed so there is no longer a way for the body to make insulin. Normally insulin would attach to the insulin-receptors and thus open little sugar doors allowing the cells of the body to take in the sugar they need. Let’s follow through what happens when the body cannot make the insulin that it needs. As the sugar level rises in the blood after a meal, there is no insulin to open the sugar doors so the sugar cannot get into the cells. The sugar backs up in the blood and the blood sugar level gets higher and higher, much higher than normal. What can the body do to get rid of all this sugar in the blood? It must wash it out through the kidneys and that takes a lot of water, which makes a lot of urine. But , it also dehydrates the body in the p Continue reading >>

Should Type 1's Be Able To Join The Military?

Should Type 1's Be Able To Join The Military?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Should Type 1's be able to join the military? About april i was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, And my dream was to join the Royal Marine Commando's. I personally think that you should be allowed to join them if you can prove to the medical team that you can control your diabetes, and Work in any situation with it, Or a idea that i had was you could stay on a base if they occupy another country and defend that base. Recently i was on their website and i was reading up on it more and i came across some words. "You could become part of the one of the worlds best elite fighting forces. Nothing stands in our way. What will stand in yours?" Diabetes will stand in our way, But i don't think we will let it, Does anybody have any ideas to help me I seriously have no other plan for life, I have no qualifications No other interests in any other job, Please help Unfortunately, it still isn't possible to join the Armed Forces as a diabetic, and it's not due to whether you are well controlled. It's due to even the slightest risk of you being the weak link in a critical situation and putting your squad/flight team/crew at risk. Imagine being stuck in a gun battle in the middle of nowhere after having had your kit stripped from you by unfriendly forces. How do you deal with a low or give yourself insulin if you don't have any? Unfortunately I'm afraid that as a type 1, the risks to the armed forces are too high to employ someone with T1 who needs to be in a position to be deployed into a hostile environment. I looked at REME many years ago, and I fully understand the reasoning. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but you will need to look for an alternative. If you Continue reading >>

Can I Join The Military If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I Join The Military If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Can I join the military if I have type 2 diabetes? I realize that if you have type 1 diabetes you are automatically disqualified, but I control my type 2 diabetes simply by consuming a diet low in sugars and this works fine for me. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Source(s): My Diabetes Cured Completely - Source(s): I Cured My Diabetes - Can I join the military if I have type 2 diabetes? I realize that if you have type 1 diabetes you are automatically disqualified, but I control my type 2 diabetes simply by consuming a diet low in sugars and this works fine for me. Source(s): join military type 2 diabetes: I'm a 45 year old woman and was recently diagnosed as being a borderline diabetic. My doctor prescribed some medication, but before filling it I decided to do some research on the internet which led me to the methods. After reading this ebook and applying the methods, my scepticism turned to 100% belief. I noticed that my energy levels increased significantly and I felt more rested in the morning, my symptoms started going away. I am very happy to tell you that I have been feeling better than I have felt in years and my doctor informed me that he will be taking me off my prescriptions if I keep this up. I recommend you use the Type 2 Diabetes Destroyer to naturally reverse your diabetes. Upload failed. Please upload a file larger than 100x100 pixels We are experiencing some problems, please try again. You can only upload files of type PNG, JPG, or JPEG. You can only upload files of type 3GP, 3GPP, MP4, MOV, AVI, MPG, MPEG, or RM. You can only upload photos smaller than 5 MB. You can only upload videos smaller than 600MB. You can only upload a photo (png, jpg, jpeg) or a video (3gp, 3gpp, mp4, mov, avi, mpg, mpeg, rm). Video should be smaller than 600mb/5 Continue reading >>

Are Type 1 Diabetics Allowed To Join The Army?

Are Type 1 Diabetics Allowed To Join The Army?

Are Type 1 Diabetics allowed to join the army? I really wanna join the military but i doubt if they wold accept me since i am an insulin dependent. I was rejected to work in a cruise ship because of that, i'm afraid the military would reject me too :( Short answer, yes. I tried and was denied. However, there are exceptions to that rule. I was told that if I stopped taking insulin, lied, passed a physical and made it to basic training they would take me- what a joke! In other words, if you find out once you are already in you can stay, but if you already have it its not worth their time. Unfortunately you would never get through basic training, They would surely find that pump :) You can't be a police officer or a firefighter, or a paramedic either, It is obvious why, If you were separated from your unit for even a few days, you would likely die. Any job where you would have to drive, they just don't want the added risks. I was a paramedic when I was diagnosed. I was offered a desk job. I moved into laboratory science instead. Now Tim I must disagree with you in the aspect of the firefighter, paramedic part. I have been a paramedic for the last 14 years and am still riding the gut bus 3 days a week. Maybe in some areas they will not accept you for the job but it seems that it would be against the law. Just saying!!! Yes they will denie you into the military!! It sucks but they are way better jobs out there. Trust me, I spent 6 years in the military, I loved what I did but i found that civi life has more to offer. No theres not a lot of glory in EMS but its a great job and you can go so far with it. And this is a job they can never do without. Dont give up hope on jobs or following your dreams. I'm sorry, you won't be allowed to enlist and it is not just T1, any form of Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Military

Diabetes In The Military

There are no secrets to success. It is the result of preparation, hard work, learning from failure. Serving in the US military requires a certain level of physical fitness and freedom from any disability that may require excessive time lost from duty for necessary treatment. When civilians apply to join the military, therefore, they are required to pass a medical exam and to disclose information about their medical history. While not all medical conditions disqualify a person from joining the military, many do, and any type of diabetes generally does. Developing diabetes while already serving in the military, however, is not automatic grounds for separation (retirement) from the military. Several hundred service members (out of more than 1.4 million currently serving) are diagnosed with diabetes each year. Between 1997 and 2007, fewer than 6% of diabetes diagnoses were Type 1 diabetes , 80% were Type 2 diabetes , and the remaining 14% were not consistently reported as either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Because active service members have mandatory medical examinations and free access to health care, it is thought that there are few undiagnosed cases of diabetes among military personnel. Service members who develop diabetes and cannot maintain an HbA1c level below 7% without medication are referred to a medical evaluation board, which assesses their medical fitness and makes recommendations about follow-up care. As is the case for civilians, being overweight or obese puts a service member at higher risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. In 2011, the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center reported that between January 1998 and December 2010, nearly 400,000 of its active members had at least one overweight-related medical diagnosis. Factors that are most commonly correlated Continue reading >>

Doing Military Service With Type 1.... Is It Possible? : Diabetes

Doing Military Service With Type 1.... Is It Possible? : Diabetes

Having done the Finnish version and getting kicked out of the reserve due to my diabetes, I have to regretfully say, they were right. Sure, doing the training is possible with type 1, but IF it ever gets down to the real business, no, you cannot be a soldier with type 1 diabetes. Why? logistics and impaired performance. The medical needs of a diabetic person are an impossibility for front line logistics. In essence the logistics department would have to provide your unit with ammo and other supplies AND your meds, which would have to be cold stored (this is seriously an issue) or warm stored (actually, an even bigger issue). They would have to know your situation and personalize your unit's kit they send forward and the transport needs to be specialized as well due to heat issues. I'm sure I don't have to further elaborate why this isn't going to work. Secondly there's the issue of performance. Having already done the military service when I was healthy, I can honestly say that you cannot properly function as a soldier when you are diabetic even if you manage the perfect balance in normal day to day situations. There are a variety of factors all of which make managing the disease harder and thus making funtioning as a soldier more difficult. 1) you'd have to carry your own carbs, and a lot of them at that. Soldiers may face short periods of nothing to eat due to logistics. For a diabetic this is not good. Running out of sugar essentially means incapacitation or death for a fighting diabetic. 2) Sleep deprivation. When you're doing your assigned duty for 16 hours a day and doing 2-4 hours of guard duty / patrol a day you will be in very bad place sleep wise. I don't know about you but my sugar balance goes haywire when my daily sleep routine is disturbed properly (more Continue reading >>

Diabetes In The Military

Diabetes In The Military

Posted by ADW Diabetes | Jun 26, 2015 | General Information | 0 | Those who want to enlist in the military need to have a certain level of health and physical fitness which can be a major concern for people with diabetes. Fortunately, the latest treatments are making it a bit easier to join or remain in the military service if you have diabetes. Discover more about diabetes in the military and what it may mean to you. When you join the military it is essential to disclose all the information you have about your medical history or you could face penalties. First you must pass a military medical exam. There are multiple health conditions that can disqualify a person from joining the U.S. Military. Diabetes that is deemed to require ongoing medical treatment is one of them. If a doctor states that you can control your diabetes with only diet and exercise you may be able to join the military with administrative approval. If you get diabetes after you have been approved to serve in the military, you may not automatically be retired from service. More than a million people who were formally diagnosed with diabetes are still in the military. Most of them have diabetes type 2 though a small percentage has diabetes type 1. It may raise concerns when a service member is unable to maintain an A1C level below 7 percent. His or her medical fitness will be checked and recommendations made about the proper care and treatment for the patients condition. The majority of military members with type 2 diabetes has an elevated body-mass index, is obese, older and is more likely to be African American or Hispanic. Having a history of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), an anxiety disorder due to an extremely stressful event, puts a person at a greater risk for developing diabetes. A well Continue reading >>

Incidence Of Insulin-requiring Diabetes In The Us Military

Incidence Of Insulin-requiring Diabetes In The Us Military

Go to: Methods Persons with insulin-requiring diabetes are not allowed to join the US military. As a result, first hospitalisations or clinic visits during military service represent incident cases. Hospitalisation data from military hospitals were obtained from the Tricare Executive Information and Decision Support System, Standard Inpatient Data Record (SIDR), which includes discharge summaries of all admissions. Hospitalisation data from civilian Tricare hospitals were obtained from the Tricare Health Care Service Record (HCSR) database. Outpatient records of treatment in military clinics were obtained from the Standard Ambulatory Data Record (SADR) database, which included outpatient visits to all military clinics worldwide in 2000–2005. Tricare hospitals and military outpatient clinics have participated in the current records system since 2000. Electronic records of inpatient encounters were identified for service members aged 18–44 years who were hospitalised with a discharge diagnosis of insulin-requiring diabetes in any military hospital during 1990–2005, in a civilian Tricare hospital during 2000–2005, or treated in any outpatient military clinic worldwide during 2000–2005. Data on hospitalisations and clinic visits were entered on a monthly basis into the Career History Archival Medical and Personnel System (CHAMPS) maintained by the Naval Health Research Center (San Diego, CA, USA). A CHAMPS history consists of an individual record for each service member. It includes medical and career events and captures admissions to any military or Tricare hospital, or visits to any military outpatient clinic in the world. Case definition A case was defined as: (1) any individual who had a hospital discharge diagnosis of insulin-requiring diabetes (ICD9-CM Codes Continue reading >>

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