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Can You Have Type 2 Diabetes And Not Know It

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

8 Signs Your Child May Have Type 1 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive, August 2010 Over 300,000 Canadians have type 1 diabetes, yet when your own child is diagnosed with this disease, it can come as a shock. ‘Most kids who get diabetes do not have another family member with it,’ points out diabetes specialist Dr. Maureen Clement in Vernon, B.C. ‘Often, it’s just a bolt of lightning.’ Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood, often between the ages of 10 to 13. There’s nothing parents can do to prevent this type of diabetes. However, if you notice signs your child might have the disease, you can take action to prevent a serious complication called diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), in which the body runs out of insulin to process sugar and begins to break down fat instead. If your child shows indications of type 1 diabetes, says Clement, then don’t delay in visiting your pediatrician. ‘Don’t say, ‘let’s wait a week or two.’ Get your kid tested that day to make sure they don’t have diabetes.’ And if it does turn out that your child is diabetic, remember that as long as the disease is well managed, she can still enjoy good health her whole life. Here’s what to watch out for. Sign 1: Unquenchable thirst Children with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes may be constantly thirsty. That’s because as their blood-glucose level rises, fluid is pulled from their body tissues. These kids may especially crave sweet, cold drinks. Sign 2: Frequent urination What goes in must come out, so it stands to reason that a child who is drinking more will also visit the washroom more. If your kid is taking an unusual number of bathroom breaks, there may be an underlying and serious reason behind it. A younger child who was previously toilet trained at night may start to wet the bed again. Sign 3: Weight loss A Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Has your weight started to creep up recently and unable to shed the extra pounds, no matter what you do? Are you exercising at least twice a week? Do you find that you are more thirsty or wanting to eat more lately? These are the three top indicators that you may have Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a combination of nutritional and hormonal imbalances. According to the American Diabetes Association, 57 million people are pre-diabetic and do not know it, while 29.1 million people have already been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. Detecting signs within the body prior to a diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes can allow for prevention of this disease. It is believed that for 91% of individuals already diagnosed, changes in diet and lifestyle, may have avoided this disease. Men and women are equally vulnerable to Type 2 diabetes. Non-Hispanic black, Hispanic, American Indian and Alaska Native adults are twice as likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than Non Hispanic White adults, however, everyone is at risk for developing diabetes (Type 2). Many other conditions, such as thyroid or gut issues, can also increase the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. Chronic stress and long term dieting may also be contributing factors placing you at risk. Type 2 diabetes, known as the “silent killer”, impacts the cardiovascular system which can lead to congestive heart failure, heart attack, stroke, and kidney failure. Other organs which are also affected include the bladder, skin, teeth, nervous system, and eyes. We Can Help! Our physicians at Holtorf Medical Group are trained to perform “cutting edge” testing which detects pre-diabetes 20 years earlier than standard blood tests. We also provide evidence base, highly integrated treatment options. What is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

Almost a third of people who have diabetes do not know it. That number comes from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Additionally, most people with prediabetes — a condition that puts people at increased risk of developing Type 2 diabetes — don’t know they have it. So my diabetes story, which began in ignorance, was not so unusual. I had prediabetes for a long time before the complications caused by high blood sugar led to a stroke. This is the reason I made a list of warning signs for Type 2 diabetes. Perhaps you or someone you love will see how important it is to get a simple blood sugar test. If this sneaky condition is caught early, you can avoid serious complications. The symptoms of Type 2 are well known but are easy to miss. Two of them are increased thirst and frequent urination. The word “diabetes” comes from the Greek word for “siphon.” If the beta cells in your pancreas are working, insulin is pumping into your blood to help your body digest carbohydrates like sugar and bread and noodles. But in Type 2 diabetes (or prediabetes) your cells are resistant to insulin, which leaves much of that glucose, or simple sugar, in the bloodstream. When blood glucose levels are above 250 mg/dl, the ability of the kidneys to reabsorb fluids is blocked, leading to the release of large amounts of liquid (and sugar) into the bladder. (A urine test would show high sugar content. This is why for thousands of years, diabetes was called the “sweet urine disease.”) This process uses lots of water, leading to increased thirst. Another sign of prediabetes or Type 2 diabetes is fatigue. Since your muscle cells are resisting insulin, they are not getting fed the glucose from your blood supply. It makes you tired. The problem with using fatigue as a warnin Continue reading >>

19 Facts Most People Don't Know About Type 2 Diabetes

19 Facts Most People Don't Know About Type 2 Diabetes

Although type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, there are a lot of misconceptions about what it actually does to the body and why it happens. We reached out to diabetes expert Dr. Dorothy Fink, of NYU Langone Endocrine and Diabetes Center, to dispel the most common diabetes myths. Before we talk about the myths, let's define type 2 diabetes. thinkstockphotos.com According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic condition which causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to be higher than normal, also called "hyperglycemia." It's also known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. "It's defined as having a hemoglobin A1C higher than 6.5 — which is a measure of how much sugar has coated your red blood cells over the last 2-3 months," says Fink. When your A1C is high, that means your body isn't processing sugar correctly and too much glucose is in your blood. T2D is usually treated with lifestyle changes, oral medications, and insulin injection, but it varies by person. 1. There are many different risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes. / Via instagram.com No one thing causes diabetes, it's a multifaceted diagnosis. According to the Mayo Clinic, these are the known risk factors (although not all of these will apply to everyone with T2D): * Weight: Being overweight or obese. * Fat distribution: If your body stores fat primarily in your abdomen. * Inactivity: Getting little or no physical activity. * Family history: Having a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes. * Race: If you are Black, Hispanic, Native American, or Asian American. * Age: Being 45 or older. * Prediabetes: Having a high blood sugar but not high enough to be associated with diabetes, or an A1C between 5.7 and 6.4. * Gestational diabetes: Having hi Continue reading >>

Children & Type 2 Diabetes

Children & Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or the body does not properly use the insulin it makes. As a result, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood instead of being used for energy. The body gets sugar from foods like bread, potatoes, rice, pasta, milk and fruit. To use this sugar, the body needs insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body to control the level of sugar in the blood. Type 2 diabetes was once a condition that occurred only in adults. Today we see it more in teens and even in children. Most of these children are from ethnic groups at high risk for type 2 diabetes (African, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian and Aboriginal). In Canada 44% of children who are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes are of Aboriginal heritage. Who is at risk? Type 2 diabetes in children has increased around the world over the past 20 years. Factors that increase a child’s risk for developing type 2 diabetes include: Being overweight or inactive Being a member of an ethnic group at high risk for type 2 diabetes (African, Hispanic, Asian, South Asian and Aboriginal) Having a family history of type 2 diabetes Being born to a mother who had diabetes during pregnancy Having any of the following: Dark, velvety patches of skin on the neck and under the arms (a skin condition known as acanthosis nigricans) High blood pressure Polycystic ovarian syndrome (a condition in females that can include no menstrual periods, unusual hair growth and being overweight) High levels of fatty deposits in the liver Taking certain medications for mental health conditions Symptoms of type 2 diabetes Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Going to the bathroom more Blurred vision Yeast infections Tiredness However, many children with type 2 diabetes do Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

When your body can’t make enough insulin or can’t use insulin, it is called type 2 diabetes. Insulin helps the cells in the body absorb glucose, or sugar, for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood resulting in high blood sugar. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that has no known cure. It is the most common type of diabetes. What causes type 2 diabetes? The exact cause of type 2 diabetes is unknown. It seems to run in families. But, it often takes other factors to bring on the disease such as obesity, physical inactivity, or taking certain medicines. What are the risk factors for type 2 diabetes? Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include: Age, people age 45 or older are at higher risk for diabetes Family history of diabetes Being overweight Not exercising regularly Race and ethnicity (African-Americans, Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and American Indians are more prone to develop type 2 diabetes than white Americans) Pregnancy History of gestational diabetes (pregnancy induced diabetes) Giving birth to a baby who weighed more than 9 pounds A low HDL (high-density lipoprotein, or the "good cholesterol") A high triglyceride level Being a smoker What are the symptoms of type 2 diabetes? Symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Frequent bladder and skin infections that don't heal easily Unusual thirst Frequent passing urine Weight loss despite an increase in appetite Blurred vision Nausea and vomiting Extreme weakness and fatigue Irritability and mood changes Dry, itchy skin Tingling or loss of feeling in the hands or feet Some people who have type 2 diabetes don’t have symptoms. Symptoms may be mild and almost unnoticeable. Half of all Americans who have diabetes do not know it. The symptoms of type 2 diabetes may look like other conditions o Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Type 2 Diabetes: Could You Have It And Not Even Know?

Do any of these sound like you? You feel sluggish or have a little less “get up and go” than previously, but you attribute it to high stress levels or increased age. You’ve had gradual weight gain and chalk it up to age. You have an increased desire for carbohydrates and never really feel full after eating. People close to you wonder how you can always eat at the drop of a hat. If so, you could you be one of the 7 million people in the U.S. with undiagnosed Type 2 diabetes. Type 2 or adult-onset diabetes does not normally come on like a lightning bolt or an earthquake, but silently develops over years. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, type two diabetes affects more than 25.8 million people or 8.3 percent of the U.S population. Experts predict a whopping 10 percent increase in adult diabetes in the next decade. Anne Peters, M.D., a leading diabetologist and researcher at University of Southern California (USC), believes that the average person diagnosed with type two diabetes actually had it for seven years prior to diagnosis! How can this happen? Or better yet, how can you monitor whether you are a type two diabetic or at risk for diabetes? 1. Get a physical every year and monitor your fasting glucose (blood sugar) levels. The ideal number is less than 95. If your numbers are consistently above 100 or are in the 100-115 range, you could be pre-diabetic or diabetic. 2. Ask your physician yearly to monitor a blood test called glycosylated hemoglobin A1C. This simple test measures what your blood sugar has been averaging over the previous three months. The number (depending on the laboratory) should be between 4-6. If it is over six, you could be diabetic. If you have a parent or sibling with type two or adult onset diabetes, this test is Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Tweet Type 2 diabetes symptoms will often develop gradually and may not always show symptoms at an earlier stage. Type 2 diabetes symptoms can differ slightly from symptoms of type 1 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a lifelong condition. Once symptoms of diabetes have developed into the condition, the body will then be unable to regulate the amount of glucose in the blood. It is important to catch the symptoms as early as possible to limit damage to the body. Although there are 3 main diabetes signs shared by all people with diabetes, type 2 diabetes may sometimes exhibit some specific symptoms, such as certain skin disorders. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes often develops slowly, over a period of years, and the symptoms can therefore also develop gradually. At diagnosis, people who have type 2 diabetes may show little or no symptoms of the condition. Because the symptoms develop slowly, type 2 diabetes may commonly be diagnosed following routine medical examinations or screening tests for non-related conditions. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes may include: Feeling tired during the day, particularly after meals (fatigue) Often feeling hungry, particularly if you feel hungry shortly after eating (polyphagia) Urinating more often than normal, particular needing to do so during the night (polyuria) Feeling abnormally thirsty (polydipsia) Blurred vision Itching of the skin, particularly itchiness around the genitals (genital itchiness) Slow healing of cuts or wounds Having regular yeast infections (thrush) Having a skin disorder such as psoriasis or acanthosis nigricans Sudden weight loss or loss of muscle mass Explore the most common symptoms of diabetes: Spotting the symptoms of type 2 diabetes The presence of type 2 diabetes prevents the body from being able to lower Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 1 And Type 2: How To Tell The Difference

Diabetes Type 1 And Type 2: How To Tell The Difference

The number of people living with diabetes in the UK has tipped over the 4 million mark for the first time, according to 2016 figures released by Diabetes UK. [Read more: Could you have diabetes? 5 hidden symptoms of diabetes that could mean you're suffering] But the good news is that because most of the 59.8% increase in diagnosis is in type 2 diabetes cases, simple diet and lifestyle changes can help reverse the trend. Diabetes UK says there are now a total of 3.6 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK, compared to nearly 2.1 million in 2005. However, many cases are type 2 diabetes, which is the form often linked to diet and obesity. And that means for some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle can control the illness, which is thought to be on the rise because of increasing obesity levels. Such a lifestyle includes losing weight if you're overweight, eating a healthy diet including lots of fruit and vegetables, and exercising. These measures can help reduce blood-sugar levels, and either reduce or even stop any diabetes symptoms. And while some people with type 2 diabetes need to take medication, making these healthy diet and lifestyle choices can mean they don't need to take their tablets any more. People with type 1 diabetes, however, will always need insulin injections. What's the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? While both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood-sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that means sufferers are unable to produce the hormone insulin, which helps the body use glucose in the blood to produce energy. The immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas, and people with type 1 diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition in which the body becomes resistant to the normal effects of insulin and/or gradually loses the capacity to produce enough insulin in the pancreas. We do not know what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is associated with modifiable lifestyle risk factors. Type 2 diabetes also has strong genetic and family related risk factors. Type 2 diabetes: Is diagnosed when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin (reduced insulin production) and/or the insulin does not work effectively and/or the cells of the body do not respond to insulin effectively (known as insulin resistance) Represents 85–90 per cent of all cases of diabetes Usually develops in adults over the age of 45 years but is increasingly occurring in younger age groups including children, adolescents and young adults Is more likely in people with a family history of type 2 diabetes or from particular ethnic backgrounds For some the first sign may be a complication of diabetes such as a heart attack, vision problems or a foot ulcer Is managed with a combination of regular physical activity, healthy eating and weight reduction. As type 2 diabetes is often progressive, most people will need oral medications and/or insulin injections in addition to lifestyle changes over time. Type 2 diabetes develops over a long period of time (years). During this period of time insulin resistance starts, this is where the insulin is increasingly ineffective at managing the blood glucose levels. As a result of this insulin resistance, the pancreas responds by producing greater and greater amounts of insulin, to try and achieve some degree of management of the blood glucose levels. As insulin overproduction occurs over a very long period of time, the insulin producing cells in the pan Continue reading >>

13 Hidden Signs You Could Have Type-2 Diabetes

13 Hidden Signs You Could Have Type-2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. While most people with type-1 diabetes are born with it, type-2 can come on at any time. With type-2 diabetes, the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. If diabetes is left untreated the glucose starts to build up in the blood instead of heading straight for the cells. If the blood sugar gets too high or too low, health complications arise. Here are 13 signs that you might have type-2 diabetes: 1. EXCESSIVE THRIST Feeling constantly thirsty is one of the most common symptoms of diabetes. It's usually coupled with dryness in the mouth and can be one of the first signs to develop. 2. HUNGER A sudden increase in appetite, particularly sweet cravings, can also be a symptom of the condition. This is because of the really high or really low blood sugar levels. When your blood sugar levels dip, this sends the signal to the body that you need to eat something, which explains hunger pangs at any time of the day. 3. WEIGHT LOSS If you are eating more but seem to be losing weight this could be an indication that something isn't right. Because your body lacks insulin or it’s becoming insulin-sensitive, it can't transport blood sugar into the muscle cells. As a result, your blood sugar level becomes alarmingly high and all the excess sugar goes into your urine. Hence, the weight loss. 4. FREQUENT TOILET BREAKS If you seem to need to pee constantly, this could by a symptom too. Frequent urination is one of the major symptoms of both type-1 and type-2 diabetes. When there are abnormally high blood sugar levels, some of the ex Continue reading >>

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Could You Have Type 2? 10 Diabetes Symptoms

Diabetes symptoms Diabetes affects 24 million people in the U.S., but only 18 million know they have it. About 90% of those people have type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, rising blood sugar acts like a poison. Diabetes is often called the silent killer because of its easy-to-miss symptoms. "Almost every day people come into my office with diabetes who don't know it," says Maria Collazo-Clavell, MD, an endocrinologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. The best way to pick up on it is to have a blood sugar test. But if you have these symptoms, see your doctor. Watch the video: 5 Ways to Prevent Type 2 Diabetes Increased urination, excessive thirst If you need to urinate frequently—particularly if you often have to get up at night to use the bathroom—it could be a symptom of diabetes. The kidneys kick into high gear to get rid of all that extra glucose in the blood, hence the urge to relieve yourself, sometimes several times during the night. The excessive thirst means your body is trying to replenish those lost fluids. These two symptoms go hand in hand and are some of "your body's ways of trying to manage high blood sugar," explains Dr. Collazo-Clavell. Weight loss Overly high blood sugar levels can also cause rapid weight loss, say 10 to 20 pounds over two or three months—but this is not a healthy weight loss. Because the insulin hormone isn't getting glucose into the cells, where it can be used as energy, the body thinks it's starving and starts breaking down protein from the muscles as an alternate source of fuel. The kidneys are also working overtime to eliminate the excess sugar, and this leads to a loss of calories (and can harm the kidneys). "These are processes that require a lot of energy," Dr. Collazo-Clavell notes. "You create a calorie deficit." Hunger Continue reading >>

What Type Of Diabetes Do I Have?

What Type Of Diabetes Do I Have?

When you were diagnosed, you were probably told you had either Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. Clear-cut and tidy. Since diabetes typically occurs in two types, you have to fit into one of them. Many people fit clearly into one of these categories, but others do not. And those who clearly fit one type when diagnosed may find these clear lines begin to smudge over time. Are there really only two types? Are you really the type you were told you were? Could you have more than one type of diabetes? Is your original diagnosis still correct after all these years? A Short History Of Types Described and treated since ancient times, diabetes has certain characteristics that have long been recognized. Before the discovery of insulin, people found to have sugar in their urine under the age of 20 usually died in their youth, while those diagnosed when over the age of 40 could live for many years with this condition. Beginning in the mid 1920s, those who got diabetes when young (juvenile onset) were put on insulin, and those who got it when older (adult onset) often were not. However, the mechanisms that led to this difference in treatment were unknown. The only marker that differentiated the two types at that time was the presence in the urine of moderate or large levels of ketones when blood sugars were high. When significant ketones were present because the person could no longer make Tenough insulin, injected insulin was needed to control the glucose and they were called insulin-dependent. Differences In The Three Major Types Of Diabetes Type 1 Type 1.5/LADA Type 2 Avg. age at start 12 35 60 Typical age at start 3-40* 20-70* 35-80* % of all diabetes 10% (25%**) 15% 75% Insulin problem absence deficiency resistance Antibodies ICA, IA2, GAD65, IAA mostly GAD65 none Early treatment insu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Type 2 Diabetes Faqs

Common questions about type 2 diabetes: How do you treat type 2 diabetes? When you have type 2 diabetes, you first need to eat a healthy diet, stay physically active and lose any extra weight. If these lifestyle changes cannot control your blood sugar, you also may need to take pills and other injected medication, including insulin. Eating a healthy diet, being physically active, and losing any extra weight is the first line of therapy. “Diet and exercise“ is the foundation of all diabetes management because it makes your body’s cells respond better to insulin (in other words, it decreases insulin resistance) and lowers blood sugar levels. If you cannot normalize or control the blood sugars with diet, weight loss and exercise, the next treatment phase is taking medicine either orally or by injection. Diabetes pills work in different ways – some lower insulin resistance, others slow the digestion of food or increase insulin levels in the blood stream. The non-insulin injected medications for type 2 diabetes have a complicated action but basically lower blood glucose after eating. Insulin therapy simply increases insulin in the circulation. Don’t be surprised if you have to use multiple medications to control the blood sugar. Multiple medications, also known as combination therapy is common in the treatment of diabetes! If one medication is not enough, you medical provider may give you two or three or more different types of pills. Insulin or other injected medications also may be prescribed. Or, depending on your medical condition, you may be treated only with insulin or injected medication therapy. Many people with type 2 diabetes have elevated blood fats (high triglycerides and cholesterol) and blood pressure, so you may be given medications for these problem Continue reading >>

We Need To Talk More About Reversal Of Type 2 Diabetes

We Need To Talk More About Reversal Of Type 2 Diabetes

In 2011, a landmark study demonstrated that it is possible for people to reverse type 2 diabetes by lifestyle change. Six years later, many people have reversed their diabetes, yet many health professionals and diabetes organisations maintain the line that it is a progressive permanent condition. Meanwhile, the huge global growth in type 2 diabetes continues unabated. A transformational change in our understanding For many years, I worked as a Consultant Diabetologist, responsible for delivering diabetes care for the area around Bournemouth, on the South Coast of the UK. Type 2 diabetes was considered to be an inexorably progressive disease, fraught with risk of complications and ill health and requiring ever more intensive treatment. And this is what people were told when they attended the education programme set up for those newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. While many people responded to the lifestyle advice provided, the overall message was often perceived as negative, devoid of hope for the future, and demotivating, especially to those that found lifestyle change difficult. Type 2 diabetes is not inevitably progressive. It is a condition that can be reversed by lifestyle change and weight loss. In 2011, the Counterpoint study was published. This established that type 2 diabetes is not inevitably progressive. It is a condition that can be reversed by lifestyle change and weight loss. To me this transformational research revolutionised our understanding of type 2 diabetes. I felt that everyone with the condition, and especially everyone at diagnosis, should know that it could be reversed, and furthermore that the goal of treatment should shift from mere ‘control’ to ‘reversal’. To me, it was a message of hope, that would have a positive effect on motivati Continue reading >>

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