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Can You Have Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Yoga Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Yoga Cure Type 2 Diabetes?

Answer Wiki When you leave your doctor’s office, do you ever wonder what he’s not telling you? Every appointment, he tells you to eat less sugar and go on more walks, but aren’t there other ways to get your diabetes under control? Here’s 3 tricks to manage your diabetes that your doctor won’t tell you: Eat More Fat You read that right. Eat more fat. That’s because fat helps your body absorb insulin. That means the more fat you eat, the easier it’ll be to manage your blood sugar. But here’s the kicker: It’s got to be the right type of fat. You’re looking for Unsaturated Omega-3 Fat. Here’s some great sources: 2. Fish Eggs (Any eggs labeled “enriched” have plenty of omega-3) Grass-fed beef (There’s lots of omega-3 in the grass) 3. Do Some Pushups… Or any kind of strength exercises. All the cardio your doctor tells you to do will increase your insulin absorption a little, but to really keep your body regulated you’ve got to get your entire body moving. The best way to do that is any exercise that focuses on strength. You want to avoid straining yourself, but make a habit of doing a few pushups every day, throw in some body squats, and soon you’ll be taking tighter control of your blood sugar. Not to mention it’ll get rid of stress, and give you plenty of energy. Relax Laying back and keeping cool are vital to regulating your blood sugar. Stress causes physical distress on the body which affects blood glucose levels. Not to mention, when you’re stressed out it’s easy to overeat, which obviously wreaks havoc on your blood sugar. For easy relaxation, try out simple meditation or breathing exercises. These tricks will help, but… If You Want to REVERSE your Type 2 Diabetes and never worry about your blood sugar again, here’s what you Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (or diabetes) is a chronic, lifelong condition that affects your body's ability to use the energy found in food. There are three major types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. All types of diabetes mellitus have something in common. Normally, your body breaks down the sugars and carbohydrates you eat into a special sugar called glucose. Glucose fuels the cells in your body. But the cells need insulin, a hormone, in your bloodstream in order to take in the glucose and use it for energy. With diabetes mellitus, either your body doesn't make enough insulin, it can't use the insulin it does produce, or a combination of both. Since the cells can't take in the glucose, it builds up in your blood. High levels of blood glucose can damage the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, heart, eyes, or nervous system. That's why diabetes -- especially if left untreated -- can eventually cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and nerve damage to nerves in the feet. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, because it often begins in childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It's caused by the body attacking its own pancreas with antibodies. In people with type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes may be caused by a genetic predisposition. It could also be the result of faulty beta cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. A number of medical risks are associated with type 1 diabetes. Many of them stem from damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves (diabetic neuropathy), and kidneys (diabetic nephropathy). Even more serious is the increased risk of hea Continue reading >>

About Diabetes

About Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects how your body turns food into energy. Most of the food you eat is broken down into sugar (also called glucose) and released into your bloodstream. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin, which acts like a key to let the blood sugar into your body’s cells for use as energy. If you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use the insulin it makes as well as it should. When there isn’t enough insulin or cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar stays in your bloodstream, which over time can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, vision loss, and kidney disease. There isn’t a cure yet for diabetes, but healthy lifestyle habits, taking medicine as needed, getting diabetes self-management education, and keeping appointments with your health care team can greatly reduce its impact on your life. 30.3 million US adults have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US. Diabetes is the No. 1 cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations, and adult-onset blindness. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Types of Diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant). Type 1 diabetes is caused by an autoimmune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake) that stops your body from making insulin. About 5% of the people who have diabetes have type 1. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes often develop quickly. It’s usually diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. If you have type 1 diabetes, you’ll need t Continue reading >>

If It’s Not Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes, It May Be Monogenic Diabetes

If It’s Not Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes, It May Be Monogenic Diabetes

Twenty-five million Americans have type 2 diabetes, 2 to 3 million have type 1 diabetes, and between 500,000 and 750,000 have monogenic diabetes (Philipson 2010), which includes maturity onset diabetes of the young or MODY (see sidebar, page 9). Subspecialists like monogenic diabetes expert Louis H. Philipson, MD, PhD, would like to retire the term “MODY.” “Maturity-onset diabetes of the young makes it seem like these patients are getting type 2 diabetes earlier, and that’s not what’s going on,” says Philipson. “They’re getting diabetes because they have specific defects in their beta cells based on a single gene mutation, and each gene mutation has its own characteristics. Almost all of them result in decreased insulin secretion without increased insulin resistance. The name MODY was created primarily to distinguish these syndromes from type 1 diabetes, with its associated complete absence of insulin. But it’s much more informative to say what that gene mutation is. MODY is better referred to as monogenic diabetes.” But MODY is still in common usage. It’s also easier to say “MODY 3” than “HNF4a gene mutation.” For additional information on diabetes, visit www.kovlerdiabetescenter.org, www.monogenicdiabetes.org, www.diabetes.org, and www.jdrf.org. There’s no shortage of information about monogenic diabetes, and the search continues for additional gene mutations that cause it. But many primary care physicians and endocrinologists are unaware of this condition and how to diagnose and treat it. The prevalence of monogenic diabetes is estimated at 1 to 3 percent of all diabetes cases in the United States (Philipson 2010). As the incidence of type 2 diabetes continues to skyrocket, awareness of monogenic diabetes is also growing. Louis H. Phil Continue reading >>

What Hinders Scientists From Discovering A Cure For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What Hinders Scientists From Discovering A Cure For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 develops when the insulin-producing cells in the body have been destroyed, leaving the body unable to produce any insulin at all.Everyone diagnosed with type 1 is treated with insulin.Scientists don't know why the insulin-producing cells are destroyed in people with the condition.It is thought to be caused by an abnormal, autoimmune, reaction to the cells, which could be triggered by a virus or other infection.Experts believe there is a genetic element to type 1 diabetes.It is more common in some parts of the world than others.Unlike type 2, type 1 diabetes has nothing to do with lifestyle or weight.The condition can develop at any age, but is usually diagnosed before the age of 40, most commonly in late childhood.Around 10 per cent of the 2.9 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK have type 1. The condition develops when the body is still able to make insulin, but not enough.It also develops when the insulin that is produced by the body does not work properly - known as insulin resistance.Initially, type 2 diabetes can be controlled with a healthy diet and regular exercise.Medication is also often required and a large number of sufferers eventually progress to needing insulin.People who are overweight and have a large waist, are more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes - it is the biggest risk factor.Those who have a close relative with the condition, or who are from a black or South Asian background are also at increased risk. The condition usually affects those aged over 40, but people from South Asia are commonly affected from the age of 25.Around 90 per cent of the 2.9 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK have type 2. Continue reading >>

Why Do Even Docters Don't Understand The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes In India?

Why Do Even Docters Don't Understand The Difference Between Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes In India?

I went to meet an endocrinologist in a famous hospital, paid 700Rs for the consultation, after waiting for 2 3 hours on the queue I could be able to meet him for less than 5 mins and he asked to do some tests for 6000 Rs. he has impressive degrees and abroad work experience. I met him after 3 days for 1 min with the lab report and he found that i have high hba1c, high cholesterol, high triglycerides , fatty liver and many more high parameters and i already mentioned him that medicines and insulin are not effective in my body, even with all those medicines my blood sugar stays in the range of 300 and i was pretty desperate. He put me on a new medicine, “tenaligliptin” and adjusted my insulin to a very low number, good or bad my sugar level comes down drastically and i was so happy that I met a doc which knows something after a long time. I was on the same medication there after and an year later I started to develop tiredness, I always want to sleep and I was so tired even if I awaken or in office or in meetings and later my body starts to get pimples all across my faces including forehead,chest etc, I put on weight and my legs had swellings. I was getting chest pain and my life becomes miserable I thought i am going to die. I reviewed my medicines and checked the BG again, even with the new medicines my BG is not coming down and I get the tiredness after taking the tab “tenaligliptin”and the miracle medicine is not effective anymore and causing the health issues. desperate, and I try to met another endocrinologist from another city who got his DM from AIIMS, after a long wait i could be able to meet him with a 10k test reports, but the outcome was same and there is no answer for the situation. my situation was getting worsen, my productivity has come down like a Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetes?

What Is Diabetes?

Diabetes is a disease that occurs when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. Blood glucose is your main source of energy and comes from the food you eat. Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, helps glucose from food get into your cells to be used for energy. Sometimes your body doesn’t make enough—or any—insulin or doesn’t use insulin well. Glucose then stays in your blood and doesn’t reach your cells. Over time, having too much glucose in your blood can cause health problems. Although diabetes has no cure, you can take steps to manage your diabetes and stay healthy. Sometimes people call diabetes “a touch of sugar” or “borderline diabetes.” These terms suggest that someone doesn’t really have diabetes or has a less serious case, but every case of diabetes is serious. What are the different types of diabetes? The most common types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes If you have type 1 diabetes, your body does not make insulin. Your immune system attacks and destroys the cells in your pancreas that make insulin. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults, although it can appear at any age. People with type 1 diabetes need to take insulin every day to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not make or use insulin well. You can develop type 2 diabetes at any age, even during childhood. However, this type of diabetes occurs most often in middle-aged and older people. Type 2 is the most common type of diabetes. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in some women when they are pregnant. Most of the time, this type of diabetes goes away after the baby is born. However, if you’ve had gestational diabetes, you have a greater chan Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key. People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key. Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications. Both types of diabetes, if not controlled, share many similar symptoms, including: frequent urination feeling very thirsty and drinking a lot feeling very hungry feeling very fatigued blurry vision cuts or sores that don’t heal properly People with type 1 diabetes may also experience irritability and mood changes, and unintentionally lose weight. People with type 2 diabetes may also have numbness and tingling in their hands or feet. Although many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar, they present in very different ways. Many people with type 2 diabetes won’t have symptoms for many years. Then often the symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop slowly over the course of time. Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all and don’t discover their condition until complications develop. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop fast, typically over the course of several weeks. Type 1 diabetes, which was once known as juvenile diabetes, usually develops in childhood or adolescence. But it’s possible to get type 1 diabetes later in life. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have simi Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes

Double Diabetes

Tweet Double diabetes is when someone with type 1 diabetes develops insulin resistance, the key feature of type 2 diabetes. Someone with double diabetes will always have type 1 diabetes present but the effects of insulin resistance can be reduced somewhat. The most common reason for developing insulin resistance is obesity and whilst type 1 diabetes is not itself brought on by obesity. People with type 1 diabetes are able to become obese and suffer from insulin resistance as much as anyone else. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease whereby the body’s immune system attacks and kills off its own insulin producing cells. The autoimmune effect is not prompted by being overweight. Over a period of time, the vast majority, if not all, of insulin producing cells are destroyed. Without being able to produce insulin, blood sugar levels rise and the symptoms of diabetes appear. Type 2 diabetes is closely related to obesity, 85% of cases of type 2 diabetes occur in people who are obese. Although the process is not yet fully understood, it is largely believed that obesity causes the body’s cells to become resistant to insulin. As a result, people with either type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes start to produce more insulin than those without the condition and one of the consequences of this is further weight gain which helps to reinforce the condition. Type 2 diabetes develops gradually, usually over a period of years before symptoms, such as frequent urination, become noticeable. Progression of double diabetes Similar to type 2 diabetes, double diabetes, if not treated appropriately can become more severe over time. If double diabetes is allowed to progress more insulin will need to be injected which promotes further w Continue reading >>

There May Be Five Types Of Diabetes

There May Be Five Types Of Diabetes

Diabetes is currently said to exist in essentially two variations: Type 1 and Type 2. But a group of medical scientists believe that division is overly simplistic. Writing in a study published by The Lancet: Diabetes & Endocrinology this month, a team of international researchers propose that there are actually five types of diabetes, and that the distinctions between them could mean that some people are taking diabetes medications they dont need, while others arent being treated sufficiently at time of diagnosis. They believe the nuances of diabetes ought to be reconsidered, especially as diabetes has become the worlds fastest growing disease. In 2014, 422 million people globally had diabetes, up from 108 million in 1980, according to the World Health Organization . A person develops diabetes when his or her body either doesnt produce insulin or doesnt use the amount it produces properly. Insulin is a hormone that acts like a traffic cop for glucose levels in the bloodstream. When all is well, it can maintain glucose levels at the right amounts. When the system is failing, either because the pancreatic cells that produce insulin, called beta cells, are under attack from antibodies, or because your cells have become insulin-resistant, youre at risk of developing diabetes. Living with the condition can lead to blindness, kidney failure, or lower limb amputation, all while increasing your likelihood of heart attack or stroke. The way we designate diabetes as Type 1 or Type 2 is largely related to two factors: How old someone is when they develop diabetes, and whether the antibodies that attack insulin-producing beta cells are present. Type 1 diabetes is the type that often, but not always, begins in childhood, and it is characterized by the presence of the antibodies tha Continue reading >>

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Patients At The Risk Of Death?

Are both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients at the risk of death? Yes, absolutely. Every single person on the planet with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes will die. But don’t worry, so will everyone else - it is all just a matter of time. The real question should be are they at risk of a premature death due to their conditions, and unfortunately the answer to that is also yes for various reasons. The first reason is the impact of long-term high blood glucose levels, including damage to large and small blood vessels, which can lead to heart attack and stroke, and problems with the kidneys, eyes, feet and nerves. Another risk often overlooked is overdosing on insulin. Insulin is a highly dangerous hormone, taking too much will cause a person to slip into a hypoglycemic coma which can lead to death. Alternatively, it is possible to die from not getting enough (or any insulin), due to Diabetic ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Print Diagnosis Diagnostic tests include: Glycated hemoglobin (A1C) test. This blood test indicates your average blood sugar level for the past two to three months. It measures the percentage of blood sugar attached to the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells (hemoglobin). The higher your blood sugar levels, the more hemoglobin you'll have with sugar attached. An A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher on two separate tests indicates diabetes. If the A1C test isn't available, or if you have certain conditions that can make the A1C test inaccurate — such as pregnancy or an uncommon form of hemoglobin (hemoglobin variant) — your doctor may use these tests: Random blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken at a random time and may be confirmed by repeat testing. Blood sugar values are expressed in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Regardless of when you last ate, a random blood sugar level of 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) or higher suggests diabetes, especially when coupled with any of the signs and symptoms of diabetes, such as frequent urination and extreme thirst. Fasting blood sugar test. A blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to 6.9 mmol/L) is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 mg/dL (7 mmol/L) or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, your doctor may also run blood tests to check for autoantibodies that are common in type 1 diabetes. These tests help your doctor distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes when the diagnosis is uncertain. The presence of ketones — byproducts from the breakdown of fat — in your urine also suggests type 1 diab Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Introduction Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a person's blood sugar (glucose) level to become too high. The hormone insulin – produced by the pancreas – is responsible for controlling the amount of glucose in the blood. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 – where the pancreas doesn't produce any insulin Type 2 – where the pancreas doesn't produce enough insulin or the body’s cells don't react to insulin This topic is about type 1 diabetes. Read more about type 2 diabetes Another type of diabetes, known as gestational diabetes, occurs in some pregnant women and tends to disappear following birth. It's very important for diabetes to be diagnosed as soon as possible, because it will get progressively worse if left untreated. You should therefore visit your GP if you have symptoms, which include feeling thirsty, passing urine more often than usual and feeling tired all the time (see the list below for more diabetes symptoms). Type 1 and type 2 diabetes Type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, but usually appears before the age of 40, particularly in childhood. Around 10% of all diabetes is type 1, but it's the most common type of childhood diabetes. This is why it's sometimes called juvenile diabetes or early-onset diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas (a small gland behind the stomach) doesn't produce any insulin – the hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. This is why it's also sometimes called insulin-dependent diabetes. If the amount of glucose in the blood is too high, it can, over time, seriously damage the body's organs. In type 2 diabetes, the body either doesn't produce enough insulin to function properly, or the body's cells don't react to insulin. Around 90% of adults with diabetes have type 2, and it tends to develop l Continue reading >>

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a pregnant woman with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes could lead to problems for the woman and the baby: Birth Defects The organs of the baby form during the first two months of pregnancy, often before a woman knows that she is pregnant. Blood sugar that is not in control can affect those organs while they are being formed and cause serious birth defects in the developing baby, such as those of the brain, spine, and heart. Download Chart[PDF – 167KB] An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C- Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is a surgery to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both the woman and her unborn baby. It might lead to the baby being born early and also could cause seizures or a stroke (a blood clot or a bleed in the brain that ca Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

Type 2 Diabetes: What Is It?

Diabetes is a disease that affects how the body uses glucose , the main type of sugar in the blood. Our bodies break down the foods we eat into glucose and other nutrients we need, which are then absorbed into the bloodstream from the gastrointestinal tract. The glucose level in the blood rises after a meal and triggers the pancreas to make the hormone insulin and release it into the bloodstream. But in people with diabetes, the body either can't make or can't respond to insulin properly. Insulin works like a key that opens the doors to cells and lets the glucose in. Without insulin, glucose can't get into the cells (the doors are "locked" and there is no key) and so it stays in the bloodstream. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood remains higher than normal. High blood sugar levels are a problem because they can cause a number of health problems. The two types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. Both make blood sugar levels higher than normal but they do so in different ways. Type 1 diabetes happens when the immune system attacks and destroys the cells of the pancreas that produce insulin. Kids with type 1 diabetes need insulin to help keep their blood sugar levels in a normal range. Type 2 diabetes is different. A person with type 2 diabetes still produces insulin but the body doesn't respond to it normally. Glucose is less able to enter the cells and do its job of supplying energy (a problem called insulin resistance ). This raises the blood sugar level, so the pancreas works hard to make even more insulin. Eventually, this strain can make the pancreas unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels normal. People with insulin resistance may or may not develop type 2 diabetes it all depends on whether the pancreas can make enough insulin to keep b Continue reading >>

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