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Can You Have Hypoglycemia With Type 2 Diabetes?

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

All About Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar)

Hypoglycemia refers to an abnormally low level of sugar, or glucose, in the blood. Hypoglycemia is not a disease in itself, it is a sign of a health problem. The brain uses a lot of energy and needs glucose to function. Because the brain cannot store or manufacture glucose, it needs a continuous supply. Signs of low blood sugar include hunger, trembling, heart racing, nausea, and sweating. Hypoglycemia is commonly linked with diabetes, but many other conditions can also cause low blood sugar. This article will discuss the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoglycemia, and the difference between hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. We will also look at how to prevent it. Here are some key points about hypoglycemia. More detail is in the main article. Hypoglycemia is not a disease but a symptom of another condition. Early symptoms include hunger, sweating, and trembling. A common cause is diabetes. Alcohol abuse and kidney disorders can also lower blood sugar levels. What is hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia is a condition where there is not enough glucose, or sugar, in the blood. Levels of blood sugar are below 4 mmol/L (72mg/dL). Adults and children with mild hypoglycemia may experience the following early symptoms: hunger tremor or trembling sweating irritability a pale face heart palpitations accelerated heart rate tingling lips dizziness weakness Severe hypoglycemia is sometimes called diabetic shock. It may involve: concentration problems confusion irrational and disorderly behavior, similar to intoxication inability to eat or drink Complications If a person does not take action when symptoms of hypoclycemia appear, it can lead to: A person who regularly experiences hypoglycemia may become unaware that it is happening. They will not notice the warning signs, and this can lea Continue reading >>

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

10 Warning Signs Of Low Blood Sugar

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is common among people with diabetes and can occur even when you're carefully managing the condition. "Hypoglycemia happens when the amount of blood glucose (sugar in the blood) drops to a level that's too low to sustain normal functioning," says Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, author of 2 Day Diabetes Diet. "In most people, this is defined as a blood-sugar level below 70 milligrams per deciliter." A review published in June 2015 in the journal PLoS One found that among people with type 2 diabetes, this is a far too common occurrence. Individuals with the condition had an average of 19 mild episodes of hypoglycemia per year, and nearly one severe episode per year on average. Low blood sugar was particularly common among those taking insulin. This decrease in blood sugar levels can cause both short-term complications, like confusion and dizziness, as well as more serious, long-term complications. Left untreated, it can lead to a coma and even death. To prevent hypoglycemia and its dangerous side effects, it's crucial to monitor your glucose levels and treat low blood sugar as soon as you become aware of it. Pay attention to these telltale signs of dipping blood sugar levels to make sure yours stays under control: 1. Ravenous Hunger If you've already eaten but still aren't satisfied, or if you suddenly, inexplicably feel as if you're starving, your body is signaling that it needs more glucose. Work with your healthcare team to determine the exact amount of sugar your body needs. A good starting point is the American Diabetes Association's recommendation to eat between 15 and 20 grams (g) of sugar or carbohydrates with each snack, and between 40 and 65 g at each meal. Some good options include 2 tablespoons of raisins, 4 ounces of fruit juice Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia is a condition that occurs when your blood sugar -LRB- glucose -RRB- is too low . Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar levels drop below a certain level that your own body is used to. Yes there were shown low, and I was also shown to have very low blood pressure and blood sugar levels (showing symptoms of hypoglycemia). I WAS having SEVERE low blood sugar episodes SEVERAL, SEVERAL times a day, and thought that I had reactive hypoglycemia and even saw an endocrinologist who was convinced otherwise. i've never been officially tested for hypoglycemia, but i'm pretty sure i have blood sugar issues Overview Cold sweatsConfusionConvulsionsComaDouble vision or blurry visionFatigueGeneral discomfort , uneasiness , or ill feeling -LRB- malaise -RRB- HeadacheHungerIrritability -LRB- possible aggression -RRB- NervousnessRapid heart rateTremblingOther symptoms that may be associated with this disease : Decreased alertnessDifferent size pupilsDizzinessExcessive sweatingFaintingHallucinationsMemory lossMuscle painPalenessPounding heartbeat -LRB- heartbeat sensations -RRB- Sleeping difficulty Symptoms A snack or drink containing sugar will raise the blood glucose level . You should see an immediate improvement in symptoms.Infants that are born with hypoglycemia are given glucose through a vein until the body begins to control its own blood sugar level.Persons with severe hypoglycemia are treated with glucose injections or the hormone glucagon . Immediate treatment is needed to prevent serious complications or death.Your doctor may tell you to change your diet so that you get more even amounts of glucose into your body throughout the day . For hypoglycemia, diet is usually all that's needed. This may prevent further episodes of low blood sugar . You may be told to eat Continue reading >>

Dealing With Hypoglycemia

Dealing With Hypoglycemia

If you have diabetes, your concern isn’t always that your blood sugar is too high. Your blood sugar can also dip too low, a condition known as hypoglycemia. This occurs when your blood sugar levels fall below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl). The only clinical way to detect hypoglycemia is to test your blood sugar. However, without blood tests it’s still possible to identify low blood sugar by its symptoms. Early recognition of these symptoms is critical because hypoglycemia can cause seizures or induce a coma if left untreated. If you have a history of low blood sugar episodes, you may not feel symptoms. This is known as hypoglycemic unawareness. By learning to control your blood sugar, you can prevent hypoglycemic episodes. You also should take steps to ensure you and others know how to treat low blood sugar. Managing your blood sugar is a constant balancing of: diet exercise medications A number of diabetes medications are associated with causing hypoglycemia. Only those medications that increase insulin production increase the risk for hypoglycemia. Medications that can cause hypoglycemia include: Combination pills that contain one of the medications above may also cause hypoglycemic episodes. This is a reason why it’s so important to test your blood sugar, especially when making changes to your treatment plan. Some of the most common causes of low blood sugar are: skipping a meal or eating less than usual exercising more than usual taking more medication than usual drinking alcohol, especially without food People with diabetes aren’t the only ones who experience low blood sugar. If you have any of the following conditions, you may also experience hypoglycemia: weight-loss surgery severe infection thyroid or cortisol hormone deficiency Hypoglycemia affect Continue reading >>

The Risk Of Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

The Risk Of Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

The Risk of Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by abnormally low blood glucose (blood sugar) levels, usually less than 70 mg/dL. This condition is recognized to be one of the main restrictions in achieving normal control in type 1 diabetes. Historically, the risk of hypoglycemia has been considered lower in type 2 diabetes, however, with the increasing use of insulin to treat type 2 diabetes, the occurrence of hypoglycemia has the potential to intensify. The focus on the relationship between hypoglycemia and type 1 diabetes is due to the frequency of hypoglycemia in these patients. Per the American Diabetes Association , on average, people with type 1 diabetes experience hypoglycemia around twice a week. This number equates to a prevalence of 30% 40% a year. It is more difficult to originate equivalent figures for patients with type 2 diabetes because of the diversity. Statistically, the majority of people with type 2 diabetes are middle aged or elderly, and accurate measures of the frequency of hypoglycemia in elderly people are most likely underestimated. In addition to this, when people with type 2 diabetes become insulin deficient, they experience hypoglycemia as frequently as people with type 1 diabetes, and it may go unreported. Studies behind hypoglycemia and type 1 diabetes show that severe hypoglycemia is reported robustly over a period of one year, and mild hypoglycemia is unreliable after only one week., Likewise, studies supporting insulin-treated type 2 diabetes report severe hypoglycemia over a period of one year, but the difference is in the results of mild hypoglycemia. Some studies focused on hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes have overlooked the effects of ageing by selecting middle-aged subjects. The scarcity of el Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Pathophysiology, frequency, and effects of different treatment modalities The importance of strict glycemic control to limit the risk of diabetic vascular complications is indisputable, but many barriers obstruct its attainment. Hypoglycemia is recognized to be a major limitation in achieving good control in type 1 diabetes (1) but has been considered to be a minor problem of the treatment modalities used for type 2 diabetes (2). This may be a misperception based on inadequate information. The burden of covert hypoglycemia associated with oral antidiabetic agents may be underestimated, and with the increasing use of insulin to treat type 2 diabetes, the actual prevalence of hypoglycemia is likely to escalate. The frequency and pathophysiology of hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes and the relationship to different therapies was reviewed by conducting a literature search using the bibliographic database PubMed to identify publications in English from 1984 until 2005 related to hypoglycemia associated with treatment of type 2 diabetes, and the bibliographies of relevant articles were scrutinized for additional citations. Search terms included “type 2 diabetes,” “NIDDM,” “non-insulin-dependent diabetes,” “hypoglycemia,” and “hypoglycaemia.” PATHOPHYSIOLOGY OF HYPOGLYCEMIA Normal physiological responses to hypoglycemia The human brain primarily uses glucose as its source of energy. Under normal conditions, the brain is unable to synthesize or store glucose and is exquisitely vulnerable to glucose deprivation. To protect the integrity of the brain, several physiological mechanisms have evolved to respond to and limit the effects of hypoglycemia (3–6). In humans, the initial response to a decline in blood glucose is suppression of endogenous insulin secretio Continue reading >>

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

back to Overview Know-how Type 2 A tag-team approach on low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. Markus recently wrote an article on our German language blog talking about low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. The question (“can I have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes?”) is very common, and it’s easy to see why it’s of concern. So I’ve helped Markus bring his German post to life here in English. I hope it helps! Here’s Markus: Low blood sugar In 2014, results from the DAWN2 study were announced. It was the largest study of its kind (15,000 participants) on the “fears & needs of people with diabetes and their families.” One result stood out: The gravest fears are related to low blood sugars, especially at night. Up to 69% of the participants share this fear! So! Can you have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes? Yes! Of course! But let’s think about who exactly is at risk – and why. It’s common to think: Type 1 diabetes = at risk for lows Type 2 diabetes = not at risk for lows But that isn’t correct at all, so we should wipe it from our mind. So… what do I need to know? Maybe it’s more accurate to say that people with type 2 diabetes who take certain types of medication are more at risk for lows. We’re getting closer! But to get to the truth, we should take a look at someone without diabetes. Is it possible for them to have lows, too? Theoretically yes, especially if doing long-lasting physical activities without proper food intake. Additionally, extreme stress and binge drinking are also common causes of low blood sugar for people without diabetes. However, it’s pretty rare because as soon as BG’s drop below 80 mg/dl (4.4 mmol/L), the natural counterregulatory system kicks in, raising blood sugar back to normal levels. I’ve never exp Continue reading >>

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Print Overview For people with diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when there's too much insulin and not enough sugar (glucose) in the blood. Hypoglycemia is defined as blood sugar below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Several factors can cause hypoglycemia in people with diabetes, including taking too much insulin or other diabetes medications, skipping a meal, or exercising harder than usual. Pay attention to early warning signs, so you can treat low blood sugar promptly. Treatment involves short-term solutions — such as taking glucose tablets — to raise your blood sugar into a normal range. Untreated, diabetic hypoglycemia can lead to seizures and loss of consciousness — a medical emergency. Rarely, it can be deadly. Tell family and friends what symptoms to look for and what to do in case you're not able to treat the condition yourself. Symptoms Early warning signs and symptoms Early signs and symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia include: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger Irritability or moodiness Anxiety or nervousness Headache Nighttime symptoms Diabetic hypoglycemia can also occur while you sleep. Signs and symptoms, which can awaken you, include: Damp sheets or bedclothes due to perspiration Nightmares Tiredness, irritability or confusion upon waking Severe symptoms If diabetic hypoglycemia goes untreated, signs and symptoms of severe hypoglycemia can occur. These include: Clumsiness or jerky movements Muscle weakness Difficulty speaking or slurred speech Blurry or double vision Drowsiness Confusion Convulsions or seizures Unconsciousness Death Take your symptoms seriously. Diabetic hypoglycemia can increase the risk of serious — even deadly — accidents. Identifying and correcting the factors contrib Continue reading >>

Nocturnal Hypoglycemia

Nocturnal Hypoglycemia

Thanks to the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT), it is now well recognized that intensive glycemic control can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Despite this knowledge, one of the biggest barriers in reaching glycemic targets is the increased risk of hypoglycemia that comes with tighter blood glucose control. Hypoglycemia is often reported to be one of the most feared complications of diabetes. With nocturnal hypoglycemia being especially worrisome for those who live alone or travel alone. It can also be concerning (not to mention disruptive) for a significant other that you share a bed with. What is nocturnal hypoglycemia? Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a low blood sugar that occurs overnight while you are asleep. It is common to sleep through a low blood sugar when it occurs during sleep. How common is nocturnal hypoglycemia? According to a journal article from Medscape General Medicine: During the DCCT 43 percent of all hypoglycemia episodes and 55 percent of severe [hypoglycemic] episodes reported occurred during sleep. Incidence rates vary from 12 to 56 percent, however because 49 to 100 percent of episodes occur without symptoms the actual incidence may be much higher.1 Why is nocturnal hypoglycemia concerning? Nocturnal hypoglycemia can be especially dangerous because an individual is unlikely to recognize symptoms or wake up during an episode. Undetected nocturnal hypoglycemia is a risk factor for hypoglycemia unawareness: Hypoglycemia unawareness is a low blood glucose that occurs without symptoms therefore the person is unaware of the drop in their blood glucose, ultimately delaying treatment. Nocturnal hypoglycemia may also result in physical injury, poor quality of life and possibly impairment in cognitive function. Severe hypoglycemia can Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means low blood sugar. Symptoms include: As the term implies, low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, occurs when your brain and body are not getting enough sugar. For most people whose blood sugar is kept in the near normal range, less than 70 mg/dl can be considered low, or hypoglycemic. When you have type 2 diabetes and are treated with insulin releasing pills (sulfonylureas, meglitinides, or nateglinide) or insulin, you are at risk for low blood sugars or hypoglycemia. It is very unlikely for individuals with type 2 diabetes who are only treated with lifestyle changes or blood sugar normalizing medications to have a low blood sugar. Acute Complication: Hypoglycemia Recognizing low blood sugar is important. Why? So that you can take steps to prevent a medical emergency. First symptoms of low blood sugar: Shaking, sweating, rapid heartbeat Change in vision Hunger Headache Sudden moodiness Severe symptoms of low blood sugar requiring immediate medical attention: Behavior changes Lack of coordination Inattention and confusion Seizures Loss of consciousness What causes low blood sugars? Monitoring your blood sugar often Staying alert for the first symptoms Keeping some sugar or sweet handy (and eating it as necessary) Despite all the safety planning, you still may get a low blood sugar when you are treated with insulin releasing pills (sulfonylureas, meglitinides, or nateglinide) or insulin. So always wear your medical alert identification. And if you are taking insulin, have family members or friends trained to use a Glucagon Emergency kit. What causes hypoglycemic unawareness? Sometimes people treated with insulin releasing pills or insulin lose the ability to detect a low blood sugar – a condition known as hypoglycemic unawareness. Your brain has a trigger po Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes

Low Blood Sugars In Type 2 Diabetes

I’ve spoken to far too many people with type 2 diabetes who start to explain to me these moments of severe dizziness and shaking, and the desperate urge to eat food that they experience sometimes every day, sometimes just once a week. The problem is that no one ever explained to them what a low blood sugar feels like, how to treat a low blood sugar properly, and why it’s happening. It seems as though many busy physicians short on time assume that a person with type 2 diabetes whose A1C is higher than ideal couldn’t possibly be experiencing low blood sugars. Unfortunately, that assumption simply isn’t true. Simple guide to low blood sugars in type 2 diabetes: What is hypoglycemia (low blood sugar): the American Diabetes Association defines hypoglycemia as an event that occurs when your blood sugar drops below 70 mg/dL. If you don’t currently own a glucose meter to actually check your blood sugar level, you can a) ask your doctor for a prescription and b) stay alert to the signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar described below. You may experience some or all of the following symptoms during a low blood sugar: lightheaded, dizzy, trembling, shaking, weakness, headache, sweating, numbness in your lips, tingling in your numbs, a jello-like feeling in your limbs. To see a full list, visit Diabetes.org. Severe hypoglycemia under 30 mg/dL can lead to seizures or comas. It’s important to catch the signs and symptoms sooner than later. The cause of these low blood sugars can be: Oral medications: Most oral diabetes medications (except for Metformin) are known to cause low blood sugars. This means the dosage is possibly too high, and you should explain your low blood sugars to your doctor so she/he can adjust your dosage. Fast-Acting Insulin: Too often, when type 2 di Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetics Need To Be More Aware Of Hypoglycemia Signs And Risks, Doctors Urge | Everyday Health

Type 2 Diabetics Need To Be More Aware Of Hypoglycemia Signs And Risks, Doctors Urge | Everyday Health

Fatigue and shakiness are early warning signs of hypoglycemia. Although hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is usually associated with type 1 diabetes, the problem can also pose health harms to people with type 2 diabetes and doctors and patients need to be aware of these risks, the authors of a new article argue. In the article, which was published in the March 2018 edition of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism , authors from the Endocrine Society and Avalere Health, a Washington, DCbased national healthcare advisory firm, analyzed various materials regarding hypoglycemia , including 31 articles, 20 clinical guidance documents, and more than 50 clinician and patient tools. Their aim: to understand the prevalence of hypoglycemic episodes among people with type 2 diabetes and the corresponding health consequences. They report that severe cases of hypoglycemia led to 30,000 emergency room visits among people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in 2009. They also reported that in 2010, about 18 percent of Medicare beneficiaries who were hospitalized due to hypoglycemia were readmitted within 30 days, and 5 percent died within that time period. Ive been a practicing endocrinologist for 25 years, and I was taken aback by how big a problem this really is, says Robert Lash, MD , of Washington, DC, the chief professional and clinical affairs officer of the Endocrine Society and the lead author of the paper. RELATED: Treating Type 2 Diabetes From the Inside Out: Tips for Self-Care, Medication, and Insulin In one meta-analysis the authors looked at, researchers observed that people with type 2 diabetes have an average of 23 mild or moderate episodes of hypoglycemia per year, suggesting that despite a lack of firm statistics on such episodes, people with type 2 are Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Diabetes - Low Blood Sugar - Self-care

Low blood sugar is called hypoglycemia. A blood sugar level below 70 mg/dL (3.9 mmol/L) is low and can harm you. A blood sugar level below 54 mg/dL (3.0 mmol/L) is cause for immediate action. You are at risk for low blood sugar if you have diabetes and are taking any of the following diabetes medicines: Insulin Glyburide (Micronase), glipizide (Glucotrol), glimepiride (Amaryl), repaglinide (Prandin), or nateglinide (Starlix) Chlorpropamide (Diabinese), tolazamide (Tolinase), acetohexamide (Dymelor), or tolbutamide (Orinase) Know how to tell when your blood sugar is getting low. Symptoms include: Weakness or feeling tired Shaking Sweating Headache Hunger Feeling uneasy, nervous, or anxious Feeling cranky Trouble thinking clearly Double or blurry vision Fast or pounding heartbeat Sometimes your blood sugar may be too low even if you do not have symptoms. If it gets too low, you may: Faint Have a seizure Go into a coma Talk with your health care provider about when you should check your blood sugar every day. People who have low blood sugar need to check their blood sugar more often. The most common causes of low blood sugar are: Taking your insulin or diabetes medicine at the wrong time Taking too much insulin or diabetes medicine Not eating enough during meals or snacks after you have taken insulin or diabetes medicine Skipping meals Waiting too long after taking your medicine to eat your meals Exercising a lot or at a time that is unusual for you Not checking your blood sugar or not adjusting your insulin dose before exercising Drinking alcohol Preventing low blood sugar is better than having to treat it. Always have a source of fast-acting sugar with you. When you exercise, check your blood sugar levels. Make sure you have snacks with you. Talk to your provider about r Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes—consequences And Risk Assessment

Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes—consequences And Risk Assessment

Hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes is not often recognized as a risk with potential health consequences. Although the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes is not as great as that of patients with type 1 diabetes, the prevalence of type 2 diabetes is much greater, making it a clinically significant concern. As such, clinicians need to be aware of the hypoglycemic risk in patients with type 2 diabetes, as well as the immediate and long-term consequences of hypoglycemia. This article will review the prevalence of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes, assess the consequences of hypoglycemia, discuss how to identify patients at risk of hypoglycemia, and provide an overview of diabetes management strategies aimed at lowering the risk of hypoglycemia. Definition of Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a frequent complication of diabetes therapy, yet there is no consensus definition. The formal definition of hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by a reduction in either plasma glucose concentration or its tissue utilization to a level that may induce symptoms or signs such as altered mental status and/or sympathetic nervous system stimulation. Criteria known as Whipple’s triad are usually used to diagnose hypoglycemia. This triad consists of low plasma glucose, presence of symptoms, and reversal of these symptoms when the plasma glucose level is restored to normal.1 The level at which a patient becomes symptomatic differs between individuals, and thus there is great controversy when it comes to defining a clear threshold. In the last decade, the American Diabetes Association (ADA),2 Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA),3 and European Agency for the Evaluation of Medicinal Products (EMEA)4 have each set different thresholds for hypoglycemia, fro Continue reading >>

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