diabetestalk.net

Can You Have A Baby If You Have Type 1 Diabetes?

My Child Has Been Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes. What Does This Mean? (video)

My Child Has Been Diagnosed With Type 1 Diabetes. What Does This Mean? (video)

My child has been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. What does this mean? (Video) Paediatrician Chloe Macaulay discusses what it means if your child has Type 1 diabetes. Chloe: If your child is diagnosed with diabetes, it can be a real shock at the beginning, especially if you don't know much about diabetes. The first thing to know about diabetes is although it has many similarities with diabetes in adulthood, it also has many differences. Having diabetes shouldn't affect your child's freedom, or their ability to live a normal life. There will be some changes you'll have to make, such as giving insulin every day, but these will very soon become part of everyday life for you. At the beginning, it may feel like there is absolutely masses of information to absorb and use, and new knowledge and techniques and skills you have to learn, but over time all of these will feel like second nature, and you will be the expert about your child's diabetes. All children with diabetes have a specialist diabetes team who look after them. There are lots of different members of this team. There's a diabetes nurse, there will be a dietitian who will give you advice on what to eat, there will be a specialist doctor and there may be other members in the community, such as your GP, who are also involved. Your diabetes team will give you all the advice and support you need to manage your child's diabetes. They will explain how to do finger-prick testing, checking your child's blood glucose level or blood sugar level, they'll teach you how to inject insulin, they'll give you advice on eating and also advice on how to manage your child and their diabetes when they become unwell. The important thing to remember is that you're not on your own. There are lots of people out there to help you. There's y Continue reading >>

How To Get Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes (all The Lifestyle Tips)

How To Get Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes (all The Lifestyle Tips)

Who recognizes the name Lyrehca from the blog Managing the Sweetness Within, chronicling one woman's efforts to get and stay pregnant while dealing with her lifelong type 1 diabetes? Yes, you guessed it: Lyrehca is coming out of the closet as herself, Cheryl Alkon, now-author of the forthcoming book Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby. Today, Lyrehca (er, Cheryl) shares a brief version of her story, and some don't-miss tips on diabetes and pregnancy. A Guest Post by Cheryl Alkon, D-blogger and Author When I first thought about trying to get pregnant, almost five years ago, I did everything I was supposed to do: I stepped up visits to my endocrinologist for pre-pregnancy consults I worked to get my blood sugar numbers into the tight ranges recommended for pregnancy I saw my eye doctor to check my eyes for any longterm damage from diabetes and learned how pregnancy might affect them I ate better and took prenatal vitamins I also looked everywhere for books and websites about the subject and I soon met with the maternal-fetal medicine specialist who worked with my endocrinologist at my hospital's diabetes and pregnancy program. Despite excellent blood sugars, an overall good bill of health, and extensive knowledge about the topic, I left the specialist's office in tears. Why? The doc, also known as a high-risk obstetrician, spent our appointment telling me all the terrible things that could happen in a pregnancy complicated by diabetes. Yes, tight blood sugars were necessary. Without them, the chances of having a pregnancy colored by complications, both for me and for the unborn baby, were high. The visit was a long list of all the potential things that could go wrong, from the pregnancy itself, to actually giving birth, to the health Continue reading >>

Type 1 Pregnancy Risks And How To Minimize Them

Type 1 Pregnancy Risks And How To Minimize Them

There’s a lot to consider when trying to get pregnant or being pregnant as a Type 1 woman. There’s of course, the maternal desire to do everything you can for your unborn child so that he or she may have the best life possible. An ideal pregnancy is a full-term and uneventful one, the outcome a healthy, happy baby. Having Type 1 diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t have that; it just means that you have to be more vigilant, more prepared because of the heightened risks involved. But you’re a Type 1, so you already know how to do that. In fact, you’ve been doing it ever since “D-day,” so take a deep breath and trust yourself. All pregnancies have the chance for complications, but having Type 1 makes you more susceptible to specific ones. Here are the most important things to do in order to lower those risks: Pregnancy Advice for lowering risks for complications 1. Keep your blood glucose levels in range The most important thing you can do as a Type 1 mother-to-be is to try and get your blood glucose levels in a healthy range. Check your number and check often. This will decrease the chance of excessive sugars being given to your baby. Excessive sugars for your baby may cause them to grow quickly as if being “over fed” (Macrosomia) or can do harm to the early development of organs (fully developed by week seven). This is not just vital for your baby’s health during pregnancy but also before conception. Doctors recommend having your blood glucose levels in range three to six months before you become pregnant. Target blood glucose range pre-pregnancy (NIH) – 80-110 mg/dl before eating 100-155 mg/dl 1-2 hours after eating Target blood glucose range during pregnancy (NIH) – 60-99 mg/dl before eating 100-129 mg/dl 1-2 hours after eating Be sure to set goal Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Pregnancy And Giving Birth - Nhs

Type 1 Diabetes - Pregnancy And Giving Birth - Nhs

You can have a healthy pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, although managing your diabetes might be harder. It's important to have good blood sugar control before and during pregnancy. It's recommended you have an HbA1c of below 48mmol/mol when you're pregnant. Constant high blood glucose levels can harm your baby, especially in the first 8 weeks of pregnancy. There's also a risk of having a large baby, which can cause complications during labour. Speak to your diabetes team If you're planning to get pregnant. They can help you get more stable blood glucose levels and might suggest using an insulin pump. You'll need to take a high dose (5mg) of folic acid every day from when you start trying to get pregnant until you're 12 weeks pregnant. This can help you have a healthy pregnancy. You need a higher dose than women who don't have diabetes. You can get this on prescription. If you find out you're pregnant and it isn't planned, get an urgent appointment with your diabetes team. Keeping your blood glucose levels stable and low can be more difficult as your hormones change and you deal with morning sickness. You'll have extra appointments with your maternity and diabetes teams when you're pregnant. This usually means check-ups every 2 weeks, as well as extra tests and scans. You can have a natural birth, but it's recommended you have your baby in hospital. You might be advised to have your labour started early (induced). It's slightly more common to have an elective caesarean section when the baby is large. Continue reading >>

T1d And Pregnancy: A Firsthand Account

T1d And Pregnancy: A Firsthand Account

For women with type 1 diabetes (T1D), becoming pregnant and having a healthy pregnancy raise many questions. But planning a pregnancy or adjusting to pregnant life as a person with T1D doesn’t have to be stressful. We asked Gina Capone, JDRF’s community manager for TypeOneNation and first-time mother with T1D, to share her pregnancy story with us. Gina was diagnosed with T1D at the age of 25, and has been living with the disease for 12 years. She recently gave birth to a healthy son. What were your initial thoughts of being pregnant AND having T1D? I was reading a lot of blogs about people with T1D that were or had already been pregnant and honestly, they scared me. So I stopped reading ANYTHING related to diabetes and pregnancy and decided to just live it out for myself. There were times in the early stages of pregnancy when I was extremely scared because of my higher A1c level at conception, combined with my age (36). I was afraid that it would affect the baby, but after a couple of sonograms and blood tests, my mind was put at ease. I also had a serious bout of morning sickness in the first trimester which was nerve wrenching because it was causing a bunch of scary lows all day long and I wasn’t able to keep anything in my stomach until I was put on an anti-nausea medicine. I couldn’t even eat a glucose tab! Did you have to take any planning steps when getting pregnant? Were there any issues you had to be aware of as a person with T1D? The main thing my doctors kept telling me when I first started asking about becoming pregnant was to get my A1c into “baby range,” which to them meant 6.5 or lower and to me seemed impossible! I first started my journey for the perfect “baby range” A1c shortly after I was married—but I failed at it miserably. No matte Continue reading >>

Preparing For A Baby: From A Dad-to-be With Type 1 Diabetes

Preparing For A Baby: From A Dad-to-be With Type 1 Diabetes

The Life of a Diabetic, who has lived with type 1 diabetes since the age of 19. Originally from Pennsylvania, Chris resides in South Florida with his wife, Amanda. Managing his own search engine optimization (SEO) company, CSI Marketing Solutions, in Delray Beach, he spends most of his time working, learning about search marketing, and advocating for diabetes. We’re thrilled to have him blogging for us, kicking us off with sharing his perspective on preparing for his first child. Please welcome Chris! July 2013 was an amazing time in my life because I married the love of my life, Amanda. Fast forward to July 2014, my wife and I were not only celebrating our one year anniversary, but also celebrating the news of having our first child. After all the initial excited reactions between my wife and me, I could not help but think, “what if our child is diagnosed with type 1 diabetes?” It is a question that has popped into my head at least once a day for the last six to seven months. I usually tell myself there is nothing I can do about it if that day does come, so I cannot live every day in fear of it happening. But as a first time father-to-be with type 1 diabetes, I cannot help but think about it. Preparing for a baby from my perspective has included many more decisions other than what brand of diapers or bottles we want to put on our registry. We have had to discuss and research different items such as cord blood banking, to breastfeed or to not, a special diet for mommy while breastfeeding, what can we do during the early months of child to try and help prevent a diabetes diagnoses, etc. Preparing for Baby Stocker also made me realize how much more important it was for me to pay attention to my own health. This led me to pay more attention to my continuous glucose m Continue reading >>

Thinking About Having A Baby

Thinking About Having A Baby

“Life, like art, should be a celebration of a vision.” —Michael Larson Every person with diabetes has a compelling reason to take good care of his health: It’s the best way to live a long, healthy life with diabetes and to minimize the risk of diabetes-related complications. Women with diabetes who are pregnant or who are even thinking about becoming pregnant have at least two compelling reasons to take the best care possible of their general health and their diabetes: their own well-being, as well as that of their planned child. Having high blood glucose during the first 6—8 weeks of pregnancy raises the risk of birth defects, and the higher a woman’s HbA1c during that time, the higher the risk. (HbA1c is a measure of blood glucose control over a period of 2—3 months.) But many women don’t realize they are pregnant until several weeks after conception. That’s why it’s so important to plan a pregnancy, to use a reliable method of contraception until you’re ready to become pregnant, and to take any steps necessary to get your HbA1c level in goal range (as close to “normal” as possible) at least three months before you become pregnant. The planning stages Even if you’re not ready to have a baby, if you are a woman of childbearing age and think you might like to have a child at some point, it’s worth talking with your diabetes care team about preconception planning. Most likely, your discussions will focus on the benefits of tight blood glucose control before pregnancy. That’s because high blood glucose during pregnancy – even very early in a pregnancy – not only raises the risk of birth defects but also raises the risk of spontaneous abortion, or miscarriage. It can also cause a developing fetus to become too large (called macrosomia), Continue reading >>

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes And Pregnancy

Problems of Diabetes in Pregnancy Blood sugar that is not well controlled in a pregnant woman with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes could lead to problems for the woman and the baby: Birth Defects The organs of the baby form during the first two months of pregnancy, often before a woman knows that she is pregnant. Blood sugar that is not in control can affect those organs while they are being formed and cause serious birth defects in the developing baby, such as those of the brain, spine, and heart. Download Chart[PDF – 167KB] An Extra Large Baby Diabetes that is not well controlled causes the baby’s blood sugar to be high. The baby is “overfed” and grows extra large. Besides causing discomfort to the woman during the last few months of pregnancy, an extra large baby can lead to problems during delivery for both the mother and the baby. The mother might need a C-Section to deliver the baby. The baby can be born with nerve damage due to pressure on the shoulder during delivery. C- Section (Cesarean Section) A C-section is a surgery to deliver the baby through the mother’s belly. A woman who has diabetes that is not well controlled has a higher chance of needing a C-section to deliver the baby. When the baby is delivered by a C-section, it takes longer for the woman to recover from childbirth. High Blood Pressure (Preeclampsia) When a pregnant woman has high blood pressure, protein in her urine, and often swelling in fingers and toes that doesn’t go away, she might have preeclampsia. It is a serious problem that needs to be watched closely and managed by her doctor. High blood pressure can cause harm to both the woman and her unborn baby. It might lead to the baby being born early and also could cause seizures or a stroke (a blood clot or a bleed in the brain that ca Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Diabetes And Pregnancy

Women who have diabetes before they get pregnant have special health concerns. In addition to the new demands that a pregnancy will put on your body, it will also affect your blood sugar levels and diabetes medications. If you're thinking about having a baby, take steps to lessen the risks for both you and your child. A pre-conception counseling appointment will help you be physically and emotionally prepared for pregnancy. Meet with your doctor to find out if your diabetes is controlled well enough for you to stop your birth control method. A blood test called the glycosylated hemoglobin test (HbA1c, or just A1c) can show how well it's been going over the past 8 to 12 weeks. Other medical tests can help prevent complications during pregnancy: Eye exam to see if you have glaucoma, cataracts, or retinopathy Blood work to make sure your kidneys and liver are working Foot exam High blood sugar levels early in the pregnancy (before 13 weeks) can cause birth defects. They also can increase the risks of miscarriage and diabetes-related complications. But many women don't know they're pregnant until the baby has been growing for 2 to 4 weeks. That's why you should have good control of your blood sugar before you start trying to conceive. Keep blood glucose levels within the ideal range: 70 to 100 mg/dL before meals Less than 120 mg/dL 2 hours after eating 100-140 mg/dL before your bedtime snack Use your meals, exercise, and diabetes medications to keep a healthy balance. Continue reading >>

Planning A Pregnancy With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Planning A Pregnancy With Type 1 Or 2 Diabetes

Planning a pregnancy with type 1 or 2 diabetes Find out all about what to do if you are planning to have a baby and have type 1 or 2 diabetes. If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes, it is very important to talk to your healthcare team if you are thinking about having a baby. There are some things that are best done before you get pregnant that will reduce your risk of pregnancy complications and baby loss. Why its so important to plan my pregnancy? If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes, you need to be as healthy as possible before you conceive, and while you are pregnant. All pregnancies come with risks, but if you have type 1 or 2 diabetes, your level of risk is higher , for the baby and for you. You cant avoid these risks completely, but there are a lot of things you can do to reduce them. Preparing for pregnancy with type 1 or 2 diabetes The first thing to do is talk to your GP or diabetes team. They may refer you to a specialist pre-conception care team . You should get information about how diabetes affects pregnancy and how pregnancy affects diabetes. You will also be given details of local support you can have during pregnancy, including emergency contact numbers. Having diabetes should not affect your fertility (your ability to get pregnant). Talk to your doctor if you have any concerns about your fertility. There are several steps you can take before getting pregnant that will give you the best possible chance of having a healthy pregnancy. Step 1 Get your HbA1C to the recommended level Your HbA1C gives your average blood glucose level for the previous 2-3 months. The closer it is to your ideal level, the lower the risk of miscarriage or stillbirth. Your healthcare team will be able to tell you what this level is for you; it is likely to be below 48 mmol/mol (6.5%). If Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy – Symptoms, Risks And Management

Type 1 Diabetes And Pregnancy – Symptoms, Risks And Management

Type 1 Diabetes and Pregnancy This article will cover everything you need to know about Type 1 diabetes and pregnancy. Deciding to have a baby is a big decision for most people, and for women with Type 1 diabetes, it’s one which means a lot of thought and planning. Taking care of your health and that of your baby is important, as it is for all pregnant women, and if you have Type 1 diabetes it’s crucial. Type 1 diabetes can be difficult to manage on its own, and a pregnancy can complicate it further. Yet many women have successfully met the challenges of diabetes during pregnancy, and have enjoyed healthy pregnancies and healthy babies. What Is Type 1 Diabetes? Previously known as insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes, Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Insulin helps the body to process a type of sugar (glucose) to create energy. In Type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t produce insulin, and without it the body’s cells can’t convert glucose (sugar) into energy. Science doesn’t know what causes this autoimmune condition, and there is no prevention or cure. Symptoms of Type 1 diabetes include: Excessive thirst Passing more urine Feeling tired and lethargic Constant hunger Slow healing of wounds and cuts Skin infections Blurred vision Unexplained weight loss Mood swings Headaches Feeling dizzy Leg cramps These symptoms can occur suddenly, and usually first affect people under the age of 30. People with Type 1 diabetes need to replace the insulin their bodies can’t make every day. To manage the condition, they must test their blood glucose levels several times daily, and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Getting Pregnant With Type 1 Diabetes Research has shown those Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

Diabetes And Fertility: How Diabetes Can Affect Your Fertility

You’ve have been trying with no luck to get pregnant and have not been able to a find a reason for your infertility. You may have tried a fertility cleanse, begun eating a fertility diet, and are taking all the right supplements and herbs, but are still having trouble conceiving. It may be time to have a simple blood test to determine if your glucose levels are too high. With the rates of Type II diabetes rising every year in the U.S., more and more infertility specialists are looking toward this health issue as a main cause of some otherwise unexplained infertility cases they see. According to the American Diabetes Association, there are more than 200,000 new cases of Type II diabetes diagnosed every year, with another 2.4% of the general childbearing population suffering from the disease but not knowing it. When it comes to diabetes and infertility the answer is clear: there is a connection. No, in many cases (especially among women), diabetes alone does not keep them from getting pregnant, but it oftentimes keeps them from staying pregnant. In many cases, say fertility doctors, “a woman with higher than normal glucose levels does get pregnant month after month. Unfortunately her diabetes status prevents that embryo from implanting in the uterus, causing a miscarriage before she ever realizes she is pregnant.” In this case, the diabetes isn’t preventing conception, but is preventing an ongoing pregnancy. High glucose levels are reported to increase a woman’s chances of miscarriage by 30-60% according to statistics released by the American Diabetes Association. Even when implantation does occur, there are other risks to consider, including: An increased risk of birth defects due to damage caused to embryonic cells form the high levels of glucose in the blood Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy And Type 1 Diabetes

When you are pregnant, your ideal scenario is to not gain too much weight, pass each milestone without worry, and have a safe, fast delivery that results in a healthy baby. When you have Type 1 diabetes, however, the ideal pregnancy may seem unattainable. Lisa Pink, a new mother, was able to manage her pregnancy along with her diabetes to have a healthy baby girl. She summed up her experience: “It’s a lot of work. However, it’s also worth it when you hold your healthy, perfect baby!” Before conception Lisa learned she had Type 1 diabetes when she was 25 years old. She didn’t think about pregnancy and starting a family until she reached her mid-30s. Lisa didn’t know any mothers with Type 1 diabetes, but two of her friends knew of women who had managed their diabetes throughout successful pregnancies. Encouraged, Lisa went to her doctor a year before she and her husband began trying to become pregnant, which is highly recommended. A woman with Type 1 diabetes should attain healthy blood glucose levels before conception. This is important for the baby’s health during pregnancy but also before conception. The National Institutes of Health recommends that a woman with Type 1 diabetes have blood glucose levels in the target range of 80 to 110 mg/dl before eating and 100 to 155 mg/dl one to two hours after eating for three to six months before becoming pregnant. During pregnancy, the recommended target blood glucose range is 60 to 99 mg/dl before eating and 100 to 129 mg/dl one to two hours after eating. Safe sugar Meeting these target ranges will help decrease the chance of too much sugar being passed to your baby. Too much sugar may cause a fetus to grow too quickly or possibly harm the early development of organs. Having a large baby was one of Lisa’s concer Continue reading >>

11 Tips To Surviving Early Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

11 Tips To Surviving Early Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Congratulations – you’re pregnant! (Or, alternatively: uh oh – you’re pregnant!) Either way, this is where your adventures in pregnant blood sugar management will truly begin. You have a challenging road ahead of you, but the good news is that there’s a lot you can do to increase your chances of a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. (For preconception tips see here). 1. (Keep up the) work on your A1c: Hopefully by this point your HbA1c is at the target level that you and your doctor agreed upon before conception. This is important because very high blood sugar over time is associated with an increased risk of birth defects and miscarriage. (Though, on the more optimistic flip side, the closer your blood sugar is to normal, the lower the chance of problems.) If your A1c was extremely high in the months before conception, you need to have a frank conversation with your doctor about what impact these levels may have had on your developing embryo, and what this might determine about whether to continue the pregnancy (or what your risk is of losing it). If it’s a go, you need to immediately start working on bringing your blood sugar under control. 2. Test, test, test. In order to come anywhere close to the super-human blood glucose targets of pregnancy (60-99 mg/dl fasting, a peak of 100-129 mg/dl after meals, an average daily blood glucose of 110 mg/dl, and an A1c of less than 6.0%[1] ), you need to be testing your blood glucose a lot. As in, probably more than a dozen times a day. As noted in our pre-conception tips, a Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (CGMS) can be enormously helpful in tracking your pregnancy blood sugars, since it gives you a nearly real-time graph of where your blood glucose has been and where it’s heading — and having advance warn Continue reading >>

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

Pregnancy With Type 1 Diabetes

A leading expert on flourishing with diabetes and an international inspirational speaker 04/20/2017 06:52 pm ETUpdatedApr 25, 2017 Forty five years ago when I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes I was clearly told I couldnt have children. I didnt. Today, thankfully that advice is no longer given. And while a woman with Type 1 diabetes needs to take precautions, she can absolutely, and safely, have a healthy baby. As much information as you possibly need to understand why your blood sugars fluctuate during pregnancy and how to adjust your insulin management to keep your blood sugars as close to non-diabetic levels as possible. Also the book covers preparing for pregnancy, months one through nine of your pregnancy, delivery, and postpartum, including the challenges of breastfeeding for a woman with type 1 diabetes. My co-author Jenny is also my diabetes pregnancy coach. As a certified diabetes educator, woman with type 1 diabetes and mother, she knows this journey inside and out. Jennifer with husband Nathan and sons Oskar and Conan What makes pregnancy for a woman with type 1 diabetes challenging? Lets face it, a normal day with type 1 diabetes is challenging, balancing an autonomic system your body ought to balance on its own. And were only given insulin to do the job, while a non-diabetic body uses several different hormones to balance blood sugar. Add pregnancy to that mix and you add the insane pressure of, Every decision you make impacts the human life growing inside of you!!! And now you have to balance your blood sugars with constantly shifting pregnancy hormones. Plus those hormones impact your insulin needs in ways that are constantly changing and evolving. Also, there is never a break. Even when youre sleeping its crucial to ensure your blood sugar is as close- Continue reading >>

More in diabetes