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Can You Go On Disability For Diabetes?

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Seven Mistakes To Avoid When Seeking Social Security Disability Benefits

Seven Mistakes To Avoid When Seeking Social Security Disability Benefits

Adapted Media Release People with severe disabilities know what it means to wait. They wait medical test results; they wait doctors' diagnoses and they wait for answers to their questions about the future. Delays are typical for people filing for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits, but there are ways to avoid common mistakes that make the process even more difficult to navigate, according to Allsup. Founded in 1984 and headquartered near St. Louis, Allsup represents people nationwide for their entitled SSDI benefits. Two-thirds of all SSDI applicants will have their initial claim denied. If they appeal, and even if they are successful, they will go through several additional steps and may wait two years or longer before they ever see a disability payment. There are some missteps, however, that can actually add time and increase the delay for an SSDI award, according to Allsup. "Social Security disability payments are a significant, and often the sole, income source for millions of individuals with disabilities and their families," said Edward Swierczek, senior claimant representative with Allsup. "Unfortunately, people with disabilities often make mistakes in applying for their SSDI benefits. This may result in even more delays, which puts more stress on what could already be a precarious financial situation." To help educate claimants, Allsup provides the following information on seven common mistakes people make when filing for SSDI benefits. Seven Common Mistakes When Filing for SSDI 1. Going into the process uneducated. Some people believe it's just a matter of filling out a few forms, sending them in and waiting for their checks. They would be surprised to find out just how complicated the SSDI process really is. The Social Security Administration Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Social Security Disability Insurance

Diabetes & Social Security Disability Insurance

Determine if an individual is working (engaging in substantial gainful activity) according to the SSA definition. Earning more than $1,170 a month as an employee is enough to be disqualified from receiving Social Security disability benefits. Conclude the diabetes disability must be severe enough to significantly limit one’s ability to perform basic work activities needed to do most jobs. For example: Walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling, reaching, carrying or handling Understanding/carrying out and remembering simple instructions Responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers and usual work situations Evaluate impairments that result from endocrine disorders under SSA medical listings for other body systems. For example: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, potentially life-threatening complication of Diabetes Mellitis (DM) and usually requires hospital treatment to correct the acute complications of dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and insulin deficiency. You may have serious complications resulting from your treatment, which the SSA evaluates under the affected body system. For example, the SSA evaluates cardiac arrhythmias under the Cardiovascular System (4.00), intestinal necrosis under the Digestive System (5.00) and cerebral edema and seizures under Neurological (11.00). Recurrent episodes of DKA may result from mood or eating disorders, which SSA evaluates under Mental Disorders (12.00). Explore the ability of an individual to perform work they have done in the past despite their diabetes. If the SSA finds that a person can do his past work, benefits are denied. If the person cannot, then the process proceeds to the fifth and final step. Review age, education, work experience and physical/mental condition to determine what other wor Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

There’s a lot to take in when you, or someone you love, is diagnosed with diabetes. Finding out what benefits you might be entitled to, now or in future, may not be top of your to-do list so here’s a quick overview. Is diabetes a disability? Under the 2010 Equality Act, type 1 diabetes is defined as a disability, in that it may have a ‘substantial, long-term, negative impact on a person’s ability to carry out normal, day-to-day activities’. Many people with type 2 diabetes are also covered by this definition. The aim is protect you from discrimination, such as needing time out during the working day to check your blood sugar levels or recover from a 'hypo' (low blood sugar) episode. It sounds confusing, but if your diabetes is being controlled by medication or diet, the impact of your condition on ‘normal activities’ is decided as if you were not taking medication or following a managed diet i.e. if you were not taking insulin to treat type 1 diabetes, this would have a severe impact on your abilities (it could even be fatal) and so is considered a disability. What can I claim for? If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you will be eligible for certain benefits, depending on the extent to which your condition affects your life. For example, everyone in the UK with diabetes is entitled to free eye checks from the age of 12 – once yearly screening for diabetic retinopathy. And if you’re on any medication for your diabetes, you’ll receive free prescriptions. There are additional benefits available to those with diabetes related to disability and long-term health, such as if you need help or if you’re unable to work. Whether or not you’re eligible depends on factors like additional health issues and how much diabetes affects your day-to-day ac Continue reading >>

Does The Ssa Count Diabetes As A Disability?

Does The Ssa Count Diabetes As A Disability?

On an annual basis, millions and millions of Americans across the United States will receive hundreds or thousands of dollars in monthly benefits from the Social Security Administration (SSA). In 2013, the SSA reported expenditures exceeding $800 billion spent across approximately 58 million people. Among these 58 million, 8.9 million (roughly 15.3%) were classified as disabled workers. On average, these individuals received monthly benefits of $1,129. These monthly payments help millions of Americans and thousands of Pennsylvanians and New Jerseyans cover their costs of living, such as payments toward housing, groceries, and utility bills. Unfortunately, it is notoriously difficult to qualify to receive disability benefits. In the interest of minimizing social security fraud, the SSA has imposed very particular qualifications which claimants must meet if they wish to be approved for disability in Pennsylvania or New Jersey. One of the most basic qualifications is the very presence of a disability. While that may sound almost too simple to merit mentioning, the SSA follows its own standards in determining disability. This means that while you and your physician may assert that you are disabled, the SSA may say that you are not. To help applicants gauge their eligibility for approval, our experienced social security disability attorneys answer the question: can I qualify for benefits with diabetes? 8.3% of Americans Have Diabetes Diabetes occurs when the body cannot make enough insulin to properly process glucose (sugar). Diabetes may appear very early in life, or may take decades to appear, commonly referred to as adult-onset diabetes. Diabetes is divided into two categories: Type I Diabetes Type II Diabetes Type I diabetes means that the immune system actually destroys Continue reading >>

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Diabetes refers to a group of illnesses that result from the body’s inability to effectively produce or use insulin. This condition is characterized by high blood glucose levels. Over time, high blood sugar levels can affect other bodily functions. For example, diabetes can affect the body’s ability to fight infections and can cause serious problems for the heart, kidneys, nerves, eyes, and feet. Whether your diabetes has been recently diagnosed or you have had it for years, the complications associated with this disease can make it difficult to get around, to take care of yourself, and to hold down a job. Diabetes Can Have Serious Complications If your diabetes is well managed and you do not suffer any complications, then you can continue to work and your Social Security disability application will be denied. However, many people are not that lucky. Diabetes can have significant complications that may make you eligible for Social Security disability. These side effects include: Neuropathy. Diabetes can result in nerve damage in the legs and feet. Retinopathy. Diabetes may affect your vision to the point where you are unable to perform your work duties. Organ damage. Diabetes can cause severe damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys. These complications can be devastating and result in your total disability. Are You Eligible for Social Security Disability? The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses a five-step process to determine whether a person with diabetes qualifies for Social Security disability benefits. Specifically, the SSA is going to ask: Are you working? If you are employed and earning more than $1,170 a month ($1,950 if you are blind), then your application will likely be denied—regardless of the severity of your diabetes. Is your disability s Continue reading >>

Can I Get Disability For Diabetes?

Can I Get Disability For Diabetes?

Today, there are 11 million Canadians living with diabetes or prediabetes. Every three minutes, another Canadian is diagnosed with the condition. Diabetes is a chronic, debilitating – and sometimes fatal – disease, where the body cannot produce an adequate amount of insulin for the body, or can’t correctly utilize the insulin it does produce. Insulin is a vital hormone that regulates blood-sugar levels. Without sufficient supply of insulin, a person risks damaged organs, blood vessels, and nerves. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is characterized by the body’s immune system mistakenly attacking and killing beta cells in the pancreas. Since beta cells are responsible for distributing insulin into the blood via the pancreas, without their presence, sugar in the blood builds up rather than being used for energy. Type 1 diabetes is usually treated with insulin dosages; careful meal planning can also regulate blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body can’t properly use the insulin it does produce (called insulin insensitivity). This is the most common type of diabetes, affecting 90% of people with the disease. Depending on the severity, the condition can be managed through meal planning, physical activity, or medications. Diabetes has an array of signs and symptoms, the most common being: Unusual thirst Frequent urination Weight change Extreme fatigue / lack of energy Blurred vision Cuts and bruises that heal slowly Tingling or numbness in hands or feet It’s important to note that these are predominantly Type 1 diabetes symptoms; type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. Canadian Disability Tax Credit for Diabetes While people with diabetes can live an active, independent lifestyle, they’ll nee Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

If you are diabetic and unable to work because of your diabetes you may want to know if you qualify for social security disability benefits and how can you win your disability application. This article will give you a look at how I approach a SSDI or SSI claim to put in the best light possible for success at a financial future when your diabetes prevents you from working. How is Diabetes Defined by Social Security Social security used to recognize diabetes as one of its listed disorders. This means that if certain criteria are met then you are found disabled without regard to what you can or can not do in terms of basic work activities. However in 201l social security did away with the listing and only kept a new portion of it that gave what the ssa administration called guidance. (1) The social security administration guidance still is instructive in determining disability for diabetes as the “guidance” they give in listing 9.00 discusses in general endocrine disorders and how they can be disabling. Watch Tips for Diabetics and SSDI As paraphrased from listing 9.00, Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic gland disorder that disrupts the production of insulin. There are two types of diabetic disorders . Type 1 Diabetes: This goes by the name of insulin dependant diabetes or juvenile diabetes. It is an absolute deficiency in insulin that commonly begins in childhood and is a chronic lifelong illness. Type 2 Diabetes: This is often call adult onset or non insulin dependant where the cells of the body fight off insulin affecting blood sugar metabolism. In some cases diabetes can be controlled and in others it is not controlled well. These are usually the persons that end up with severe symptoms that affect their ability to work . Statistics on Diabetes Are Staggering The nu Continue reading >>

Can I Work With Diabetes?

Can I Work With Diabetes?

Both Type I and Type II Diabetes, as well as the other forms of diabetes, can be debilitating if not controlled. Many can and do qualify for Social Security Disability benefits because of diabetes. However, simply having diabetes does not automatically qualify you for Social Security Disability benefits. Your eligibility for Social Security Disability depends on which symptoms you have and their severity. You may also qualify for Social Security Disability benefits due to diabetes-related conditions, such as having amputated limbs or blindness. Diabetes is a digestive disease which affects your insulin levels. Because of the imbalance in insulin, your levels of blood sugar become elevated. This causes an increase in hunger and thirst and frequent urination. A common side effect of the constant hunger associated with high blood sugar levels and diabetes is weight gain and obesity. Additional symptoms include abdominal pain, altered consciousness, vomiting, nausea, and dehydration (usually due to craving sweet or caffeinated drinks to quench thirst). Nearly 3% of the world’s population suffers from some form of diabetes, making it one of the most prevalent diseases in the world. Effects of Diabetes on Your Ability to Perform Physical Work Depending on the severity of your symptoms, and which symptoms you suffer from (some people with Type II Diabetes have no noticeable symptoms at all), your ability to perform physical work may or may not be affected. In order to be eligible for Social security Disability benefits, you must be unable to perform any kind of work which you have ever done in the past, and the SSA must determine that you could not reasonably be trained to do any other kind of work. In order to qualify for Social Security Disability benefits from diabetes, y Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability And Diabetes

Social Security Disability And Diabetes

In my Indianapolis, Indiana Social Security disability practice, I handle numerous cases involving Diabetes. Since there can be so many varying degrees of severity with Diabetes, I try to find out how it affects each individual client regarding their ability to work. The Social Security Administration (SSA) recognizes Diabetes as a disabling condition either by itself or combined with other severe impairments. Diabetes can occur when the body does not produce enough glucose due to a lack of insulin. Medical treatment and dietary control can sometimes help to control Diabetes, but other times it does not. Uncontrolled Diabetes can create a variety of symptoms and these can include but are not limited to: Neuropathy (Nerve damage in the feet and/or hands. This is by far the most common symptom I see in my practice.) Retinopathy (Vision impairment) Fatigue Nephropathy (Kidney disease) Extreme hunger and/or thirst Frequent urination Just having the above symptoms is not enough to receive Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and/or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. They must be severe enough to meet or equal one of the SSA’s Listing of Impairments or prevent you from working a full-time job. Most of my clients with Diabetes say that the neuropathy they experience makes them unable to work. They complain of numbness and/or tingling in their hands and/or feet that prevents them from standing and walking or using their hands for fine and gross manipulation. As with all disability claims, medical documentation can be essential to a favorable outcome. Compliance with medical treatment can show that even though you are taking prescribed medication (including insulin), your severe impairment still exists. Objective testing such as nerve conduction studies for ne Continue reading >>

Disability Advocates Group, Inc.

Disability Advocates Group, Inc.

How Does the Social Security Administration Decide if I Qualify for Disability Benefits for Diabetes? If you have diabetes, Social Security disability benefits may be available. To determine whether you are disabled by diabetes, the Social Security Administration first considers whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal a listing at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Winning Social Security Disability Benefits for Diabetes by Meeting a Listing. If your diabetes is not severe enough to equal or meet a listing, the Social Security Administration must assess your residual functional capacity (RFC) (the work you can still do, despite your diabetes), to determine whether you qualify for benefits at Step 4 and Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Residual Functional Capacity Assessment for Diabetes. About Diabetes and Disability The complete name for diabetes is diabetes mellitus. Also known as “sugar” diabetes, diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disorder. The cells of the body need a form of sugar called glucose for energy. The body breaks down various carbohydrates in the diet to glucose. Glucose then circulates to the body’s tissues through the blood. But glucose cannot get from the blood to the inside of the cells where the cells can use it, unless the hormone insulin is also present. Insulin permits passage of glucose through the cell membrane. Insulin is secreted by the pancreas. The pancreas is an elongated organ located behind the stomach. Special cells, known as the Islets of Langerhans, are spread throughout it. These cells produce insulin that is released into the blood. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas does not produce any or enough insulin or when the body is unable to use effectively the insulin that is produced. High Continue reading >>

Making A Living With Diabetes: Disability

Making A Living With Diabetes: Disability

Working a job with diabetes can be tough, sometimes impossible. If you run out of work options, you may qualify for disability pay. Here are some things to consider. The Social Security Administration (SSA) has two disability programs: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). SSDI is insurance most workers pay into through payroll taxes. Depending on how much you’ve paid into it, your monthly payments might range from about $700 to about $1,700 per month. SSI is not insurance. It’s a need-based program for people who haven’t paid payroll taxes. SSI maxes out at about $730 per month for an eligible person and $1,100 per month for an eligible person with an eligible spouse. Here’s a calculator that will give a very rough estimate how much you might get on SSDI. There are also private disability insurance plans you can buy into, or your employer may provide. Having one could make your life much easier, if you qualify as disabled. Should you consider disability? Nobody wants to go on disability. Work is too important a part of most people’s lives. Some people may feel they will be freeloading if they receive disability benefits. People will say you’re not contributing. I reject those thoughts totally. I relied on SSDI for 15 years, since I could no longer work as a nurse. I have always regarded it as government paying me to do good things. I write books and health articles; I volunteer. I take care of myself and try to be of service. Like most people on disability, I spent all the payments on necessities, helping keep the economy going. Being disabled might be embarrassing, but it can be lifesaving. A Forbes magazine piece quoted one woman with lung disease. “Emotionally, going on disability insurance was a Godsend, k Continue reading >>

What Conditions Can Qualify A Person For Social Security Disability?

What Conditions Can Qualify A Person For Social Security Disability?

Social Security Disability benefits are no one’s “fix-all” if they are suffering from a physical or mental disability. However, SSD benefits may help the disabled person and his or her family battle the stresses associated with a disability and could result in getting necessary medical care under Medicare. But who is entitled to receive Social Security Disability benefits? To be eligible for Social Security Disability (SSDI) benefits, a person must have an impairment, either medical, psychological, or psychiatric in nature and that impairment must be severe enough that it prevents a disabled individual from working, or, if they continue to work, prevents the person from earning substantial money. Lastly, the impairment must last at least twelve calendar months, or be projected to last that long. Some conditions that may qualify for SSD benefits (as long as the other prongs of the test are met) include: Musculoskeletal problems including fractures, poorly healed bone breaks, soft tissue injuries, spinal arachnoiditis, arthritis, osteoarthrtis, rheumatoid arthritis, hip, neck, shoulder, ankle, wrist, back, or other joint problems, disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, scoliosis, carpal tunnel syndrome, plantar fasciitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, low back pain, RSI or repetitive stress injury. Conditions for which the etiology is unclear such as fibromyalgia, chronic pain, chronic fatigue Mental conditions, mental illness, and mental disorders including borderline intellectual functioning, low IQ, mental retardation, learning disability, personality disorder, schizo-affective disorder, schizophrenia, somatoform disorder, autism, asperger’s syndrome, down syndrome, obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), memory loss, nerves Endocrine related probl Continue reading >>

Can I Qualify For Disability If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Qualify For Disability If I Have Diabetes?

As a condition that over 25 million children and adults suffer from, diabetes is a highly prevalent medical problem for Americans. Whether it is type 1 diabetes, in which the body simply does not produce insulin, or type 2 diabetes, in which the body develops a resistance to insulin (also called hyperglycemia due to the rise in blood glucose levels), every day, people across the country struggle to adapt to this condition. In fact, there are treatments available that can diminish the effects of diabetes on the body and allow people suffering from diabetes to lead normal, productive lives. If diabetes is so manageable, does that mean that you cannot apply for disability because of diabetes? In many cases, the answer would be no. Most cases of diabetes are manageable with proper treatment, and in order to qualify for disability, your condition has to continue to be disabling despite the application of recommended medical treatment. However, just because diabetes is the condition you suffer from, that does not mean that you have no chance of qualifying for Social Security Disability benefits. While not usually considered disabling on its own, diabetes can cause numerous other conditions that can qualify as being disabling enough for SSDI benefits. Example I - Loss of Extremities One of the effects diabetes can have on the body is the restriction of blood flow to the limbs, particularly the legs. According to the American Diabetes Association statistics page, over 65,000 lower-limb amputations had to be performed on people suffering from diabetes. Anyone whose employment requires the use of his or her legs would likely be permanently disabled by such a procedure. However, it is important to preserve any medical records proving the necessity of the amputation for the disabil Continue reading >>

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