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Can You Go On Disability For Diabetes?

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http://www.DisabilityAdvisor.com See how your Social Security disability benefit amount is calculated when you are approved as a disabled worker or widow, or disabled adult child. For answers to your questions about Social Security Disability or for help with a benefits claim call toll-free: 1-888-393-1010. 2011 Sun Telemedia LLC

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circula Continue reading >>

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  1. MAYS

    Can I Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes?

    If you have diabetes, Social Security disability benefits may be available. To determine whether you are disabled by diabetes, the Social Security Administration first considers whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal a listing at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process.
    If your diabetes is not severe enough to equal or meet a listing, the Social Security Administration must assess your residual functional capacity (RFC) (the work you can still do, despite your diabetes), to determine whether you qualify for benefits at Step 4 and Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Residual Functional Capacity Assessment for Diabetes.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes.htm
    How to Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes by Meeting a Listing
    To determine whether you are disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process, the Social Security Administration will consider whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing.
    The Social Security Administration has developed a set of rules called Listing of Impairments for most common impairments. The listing for each impairment describes a degree of severity that the Social Security Administration presumes would prevent a person from performing substantial work. If your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing, you will be eligible for disability benefits.
    The listing for diabetes is 9.08, which has three parts: A, B, and C. You will be disabled if you meet either part A, part B, or Part C.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes-2.htm
    Equaling a Listing With a Combination of Impairments from Diabetes
    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted disease.
    Even if you don’t meet one of the diabetes listings, you may still be found disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. You may have a combination of impairments that together equal the severity of disability of a listing. For example, you may have autonomic neuropathy with hospitalizations for gastric paralysis or dizziness from low blood pressure related to autonomic insufficiency affecting the arterial vascular bed; or an enlarged heart, with coronary artery disease, etc

  2. Mirena

    I thought about applying for SSI. But I don't think I would qualify since I am able body and working.

  3. jayabee52

    yes, diabetes is not BY ITSELF cause for ssi.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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What is DISABILITY TAX CREDIT? What does DISABILITY TAX CREDIT mean? DISABILITY TAX CREDIT meaning - DISABILITY TAX CREDIT definition - DISABILITY TAX CREDIT explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6Uu... The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) is a non-refundable tax credit in Canada for individuals who have a severe and prolonged impairment in physical or mental function. An impairment qualifies as prolonged if it is expected to or has lasted at least 12 months. The DTC is required in order to qualify for the Registered Disability Savings Plan , the working income tax benefit, and the child disability benefit. Families using a Henson trust, the Canada Disability Child Benefit other estate planning methods for children with Disabilities are not excluded from the DTC and should consider whether they qualify. The individual must be "markedly restricted" in at least one of the following categories: speaking, hearing, walking, elimination (bowel or bladder functions), feeding, dressing, performing the mental functions of everyday life, life-sustaining therapy to support vital function and the recently introduced cumulative effects of significant restrictions. The degree of disability must be approved by Canada Revenue Agency before it can be used, and this process requires the completion and submission of a form. The T2201 Disability Tax Credit Certificate form must be completed by a qualified professional related to the impairment such as a medical doctor, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, psychologist, audiologist, or optometrist, in order to qualify as having a severe and prolonged impairment. The practitioner must certify on the T2201 form that the impairment meets specific conditions within the set category. The conditions vary depending on impairment. A document released by the Canadian Psychological Association (CPA) in response to suggestions they made to the House of Commons Sub-Committee on the Status of Persons with Disabilities, attempts to assist medical professionals with deciphering what qualifies as being markedly restricted in the "mental functions necessary for everyday life". In 2005, the CRA introduced a new category of eligibility, "cumulative effect of significant restrictions". This category is useful for individuals who are disabled but not restricted enough to qualify as being markedly restricted. Since this was introduced in 2005,an applicant may only be able to recapture funds since that point. An applicant can file for the disability amount, back 10 years, due to the Tax Payer Relief Provisions in the Income Tax Act. The DTC amounts to C$7,687 (According to line 316) in tax savings, and if filed for the full 10 year period the possible tax savings are excess of 30,000. The DTC can be found on line 316 (for self) and line 318 (transferred to a supporting relative). If the medical practitioner charges to complete the T2201 form, applicants can claim this as a medical expense on line 330 of his/her tax return. In addition to lowering taxes, qualifying for tax credits can also be a requirement for applying for other money-saving vehicles such as the Registered Disability Savings Plan. If the person with the impairment does not have a taxable income, he/she can transfer credits to a supporting relative such as a parent, grandparent, child, sibling, grandchild, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew. The disability amount can be transferred in either its entirety or as the remainder of what the dependent was unable to claim himself or herself. An Association of Canadian Disability Benefit Professionals was created to represent and serve a network of organizations that assist clients in registering for the disability tax credit, registered disability savings plan and other disability tax benefits. It was created by the twelve organizations specializing in this field including the biggest, the National Benefit Authority, they all committed to ACDBP Code of Conduct. The Association advocates on behalf of its members for policy and program efficiency at the federal and provincial level.

Can You Receive Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

According to the American Diabetes Association, a total of “25.8 million children and adults in the United States—8.3% of the population—have diabetes.” In 2007 alone, more than 70,000 death certificates listed diabetes as the underlying cause of death. Diabetes is known to result in such severe conditions as blindness, kidney disease, neuropathy, and even necrosis of the limbs (usually legs) that necessitates amputation. With such an extensive list of complications and a skyrocketing death toll, one might think that diabetes would be recognized as a disabling condition in the SSA’s blue book. So, Does Diabetes Qualify for SSDI Benefits? The answer to this question is both yes and no. In and of itself, diabetes is not considered sufficiently disabling by the SSA, though it can cause disabling conditions that do qualify. This is because diabetes, when managed through an appropriate treatment regimen, does not typically interfere with a person’s ability to engage in “substantial gainful activity,” i.e. work. One of the SSA’s most important screening tests is to determine if you can continue to perform the work you had been doing before with reasonable accommodations Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. MAYS

    Can I Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes?

    If you have diabetes, Social Security disability benefits may be available. To determine whether you are disabled by diabetes, the Social Security Administration first considers whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal a listing at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process.
    If your diabetes is not severe enough to equal or meet a listing, the Social Security Administration must assess your residual functional capacity (RFC) (the work you can still do, despite your diabetes), to determine whether you qualify for benefits at Step 4 and Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Residual Functional Capacity Assessment for Diabetes.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes.htm
    How to Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes by Meeting a Listing
    To determine whether you are disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process, the Social Security Administration will consider whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing.
    The Social Security Administration has developed a set of rules called Listing of Impairments for most common impairments. The listing for each impairment describes a degree of severity that the Social Security Administration presumes would prevent a person from performing substantial work. If your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing, you will be eligible for disability benefits.
    The listing for diabetes is 9.08, which has three parts: A, B, and C. You will be disabled if you meet either part A, part B, or Part C.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes-2.htm
    Equaling a Listing With a Combination of Impairments from Diabetes
    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted disease.
    Even if you don’t meet one of the diabetes listings, you may still be found disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. You may have a combination of impairments that together equal the severity of disability of a listing. For example, you may have autonomic neuropathy with hospitalizations for gastric paralysis or dizziness from low blood pressure related to autonomic insufficiency affecting the arterial vascular bed; or an enlarged heart, with coronary artery disease, etc

  2. Mirena

    I thought about applying for SSI. But I don't think I would qualify since I am able body and working.

  3. jayabee52

    yes, diabetes is not BY ITSELF cause for ssi.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more
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Friedman Disability attorney Chad Beck describes eligibility requirements for Supplemental Security Income (Child SSI) benefits. Please contact us to find out if your child might be eligible for Child SSI. Learn more on our website: www.friedmandisability.com.

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes is a life-threatening condition that affects almost 30 million Americans, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) reported. The number of cases of diabetes has been rising steadily over the years, causing almost 70,000 deaths in 2010 and contributing to about 230,000 more. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with diabetes, there is help available. The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers financial benefits for those struggling to work due to a disabling disease. The Financial Costs of Diabetes Diabetes is an expensive condition, costing individuals more than twice as much in healthcare costs than their healthy counterparts. ADA reports that those suffering from the condition will pay an extra $7,900 each year in hospital care, prescriptions, supplies, doctor’s visits and other direct medical expenses. In addition to direct medical costs, diabetes caused $69 billion dollars in indirect costs, which include missed workdays, decreased productivity at work, and the inability to work. This means, on average, those with diabetes are also losing almost $2,500 per year. Diabetes Self-Management pointed out that many with diabetes have trouble affording the necessary Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. MAYS

    Can I Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes?

    If you have diabetes, Social Security disability benefits may be available. To determine whether you are disabled by diabetes, the Social Security Administration first considers whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal a listing at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process.
    If your diabetes is not severe enough to equal or meet a listing, the Social Security Administration must assess your residual functional capacity (RFC) (the work you can still do, despite your diabetes), to determine whether you qualify for benefits at Step 4 and Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Residual Functional Capacity Assessment for Diabetes.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes.htm
    How to Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes by Meeting a Listing
    To determine whether you are disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process, the Social Security Administration will consider whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing.
    The Social Security Administration has developed a set of rules called Listing of Impairments for most common impairments. The listing for each impairment describes a degree of severity that the Social Security Administration presumes would prevent a person from performing substantial work. If your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing, you will be eligible for disability benefits.
    The listing for diabetes is 9.08, which has three parts: A, B, and C. You will be disabled if you meet either part A, part B, or Part C.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes-2.htm
    Equaling a Listing With a Combination of Impairments from Diabetes
    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted disease.
    Even if you don’t meet one of the diabetes listings, you may still be found disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. You may have a combination of impairments that together equal the severity of disability of a listing. For example, you may have autonomic neuropathy with hospitalizations for gastric paralysis or dizziness from low blood pressure related to autonomic insufficiency affecting the arterial vascular bed; or an enlarged heart, with coronary artery disease, etc

  2. Mirena

    I thought about applying for SSI. But I don't think I would qualify since I am able body and working.

  3. jayabee52

    yes, diabetes is not BY ITSELF cause for ssi.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more

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