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Can You Give Yourself Diabetes

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

A Diabetes Test You Can Do Yourself

Are you urinating more often, feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired? Maybe you’re losing weight. You may have type 2 diabetes. To find out, you can make an appointment with your doctor and have your blood tested for the condition. Or you can go to the drug store, buy a blood glucose meter, and give yourself a diabetes test. An estimated 40 percent of adults with type 2 diabetes don’t know they have it, which means they aren’t getting treatment that could protect them from very serious health problems down the road, such as heart disease, stroke, blindness, and kidney failure. The best option is to go to a doctor if you’re having symptoms of diabetes. But if you’re reluctant to do that, for whatever reason, the next best thing is to buy an over-the-counter diabetes test kit. "If you have a family history of diabetes, are obese, or have high blood pressure, you should test yourself for diabetes, if your doctor hasn’t already done so," says Marvin M. Lipman, M.D., Consumer Reports' chief medical adviser. "By being a proactive person, you might save yourself a lot of grief in the future.” Blood glucose meters can be purchased without a prescription. Models in our Ratings of more than two dozen devices cost $10 to $75. They usually come with 10 lancets, but you might have to buy a pack of test strips separately, which can cost $18 and up; check the package to see what it includes. If the meter doesn’t come with strips, make sure you buy a pack made for that model or you’ll get inaccurate results. Most models come with batteries. Here’s what you need to do next: Fast overnight. Don’t have anything to eat or drink (except water) for at least 8 hours, then test yourself first thing in the morning, before breakfast. Follow directions. Read the manual to ma Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only cause of weight gain. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy them sometimes. People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is not Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Can You Give Yourself Diabetes By Drinking Too Much Soda? : Askscience

Can You Give Yourself Diabetes By Drinking Too Much Soda? : Askscience

Can you give yourself diabetes by drinking too much soda? Like say... Mt Dew? How much would it take and for how long? And would this be reversible with diet change or permanent? [] hiv_mind 100 Answer Link 9 points10 points11 points I assume by 'diabetes' you mean Type II Diabetes mellitus. If you drink high-energy drinks and fail to excercise enough to burn off the energy, leading to weight gain, then you could in fact develop this condition, but it would not be the direct result of the soda. Type II diabetes mellitus is considered a lifestyle disease with genetic components that can increase risk. Since obesity is such a huge risk factor for the disease, only soda that was in excess of your dietary requirements would be an issue. If you only have mountain dew occasionally, and not to excess, you would have no problem, and in fact mountain dew itsself does not 'cause' diabetes any more than potato chips or cake 'causes' it. A sedentary lifestyle and inadequate excercise, leading to obesity, would put you at greatly increased risk. It's short-sighted to say '[food/drink x] causes diabetes' when it is a complex disease with multiple risk factors. Wikipedia link to relevant section: Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself Diabetes

How To Give Yourself Diabetes

Although researchers dont know exactly what causes diabetes, it affects 21 million people in the U.S. and continues to spread. The American Diabetes Association explains that in diabetes, the body doesnt produce or properly use insulin. (Insulin converts starches and sugars into our bodys fuel.) Here's few things that can put you on the fast track to diabetes. Watch two or more hours of TV daily. Increased risk: 14% Have one bout of major depression. Increased risk: 23% Eat lots of processed meat. Increased risk: 43% Skip breakfast every morning. Increased risk: up to 50% Drinking one soda every day. Increased risk: 83% Wake up at night and don't return to sleep. Increased risk: 98% Eat fast food more than twice a week. Increased risk: 100% Have the majority of your extra body mass (fat) around your waist instead of evenly distributed. Increased risk: a whopping 330% We say it a lot around here, but it bears repeating: Eat healthy and exercise to help avoid all of the above. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 5 Dumb Ways To Boost Your Risk

Diabetes: 5 Dumb Ways To Boost Your Risk

Some people are born with diabetes. Others bring on the condition by making certain lifestyle choices, and a new 11-year study of more than 200,000 men and women between the ages of 50 and 71 highlights five in particular. Want to give yourself diabetes? Here are five things you can do, as suggested by the Annals of Internal Medicine study ... Want to boost your risk for diabetes? Let yourself become overweight or obese. The study showed that being even a bit overweight raises the risk for diabetes. Carrying extra weight boosts diabetes risk by causing inflammation throughout the body and by reducing cells' sensitivity to insulin as well as the production of insulin. "Eventually, the pancreas just can't keep up with the demand for insulin," study author Dr. Jared Reis, an epidemiologist at the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, told CBS News. Smoking cigarettes is a great way to boost your diabetes risk. The chemicals in tobacco smoke cause inflammation and apparently have a toxic effect on the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Don't want diabetes? Don't start smoking. If you do smoke, quit. Evidence suggests that at some point after smokers kick the habit, their diabetes risk drops to normal levels, Dr. Reis told CBS News. Being sedentary is a great way to boost your risk for diabetes. The study showed that all you have to do is get less than 20 minutes of sweat-producing exercise on three or four days of the week. On the other hand, the study showed that if you get that much exercise or more, you'll be reducing your diabetes risk. Sure, you could eat healthfully - emphasizing fruits and veggies while limiting your consumption of fatty food and desserts. But that's not going to boost your diabetes risk. Current guidelines call for people to women to ha Continue reading >>

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet , exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. Your cholesterol and blood pressure rise. Withtype 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; withtype 2 diabetes , your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertensiona risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally .) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Continue reading >>

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

While close to 10 percent of Americans have diabetes, there’s a lot of misinformation about the disease. This is especially the case for type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. Here are nine myths about type 2 diabetes — and the facts that debunk them. 1. Diabetes isn’t a serious disease. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease. In fact, two out of three people with diabetes will die from cardiovascular-related episodes, such as a heart attack or stroke. However, diabetes can be controlled with proper medications and lifestyle changes. 2. If you’re overweight, you’ll automatically get type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is a serious risk factor, but there are other factors that put you at an increased risk. Having a family history of diabetes, having high blood pressure, or being sedentary are just some of these other factors. 3. Exercising when you have diabetes only increases your chances of experiencing low blood sugar. Don’t think that just because you have diabetes you can skip out on your workout! Exercise is crucial to controlling diabetes. If you’re on insulin, or a medication that increases insulin production in the body, you have to balance exercise with your medication and diet. Talk to your doctor about creating an exercise program that’s right for you and your body. 4. Insulin will harm you. Insulin is a lifesaver, but it’s also difficult to manage for some people. New and improved insulin allows for much tighter blood sugar control with lower risk of low or high blood sugar. Testing your blood sugar levels, however, is the only way to know how your treatment plan is working for you. 5. Having diabetes means your body isn’t producing enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes typically have enough insulin when they’re Continue reading >>

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

A: Not specifically. But too much of any unhealthy food can make you fat, which can cause diabetes. Our expert: Prof Ian Caterson It's a warning that rings harshly in the ear of anyone with a sweet tooth. You're about to tuck into a bag of your favourite lollies when someone shrieks in horror: "Don't eat those! You'll get diabetes!!" But do high-sugar foods really pose this risk? It's true that diabetes is a disease where there's too much glucose — a type of sugar — in your blood. But just because you have high blood sugar doesn't mean eating a lot of sugar is what got you there, says Ian Caterson, Boden Professor of Human Nutrition at the University of Sydney. In fact, the notion there's a direct link between eating sugar and developing diabetes is a myth, Caterson says. However, eating too many sugary foods can lead to weight gain, a key trigger for the most common form of diabetes: type 2. But so can eating too much of many other unhealthy foods, not just those high in sugar. "It is more being overweight — particularly around the waist — that is linked with type 2 diabetes than any particular food you eat," he says. Body fat and insulin Weight gain can lead to diabetes because extra body fat causes chemical changes in your body. "We used to think fat was just a storage tissue but we now know it's more than that," Caterson says. It's an active tissue which produces hormones — chemical messengers that influence processes in the body, he says. In particular, hormones produced by fat influence the activity of another hormone, insulin, which controls the uptake of glucose from your blood. Glucose is the body's main source of energy and it comes from carbohydrates such as potatoes, bread, pasta and rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is rele Continue reading >>

How To Give Yourself Diabetes In Six Hours

How To Give Yourself Diabetes In Six Hours

How to Give Yourself Diabetes in Six Hours blood tests , diabetes , Health , junk food , olive oil Ever wonder how to go from healthy to horrifically unhealthy in a short period of time? Its a lot easier than you think. This video is amazing (thanks AJ) for showing what ingesting some olive oil can quickly do to your health. Or what having that one cheat meal can really do to your body. This guy is nice enough to eat some junk for us and show us what happens to his blood. Check it out. For more exclusive content, sign up for my newsletter! You'll get tons of practical healthy eating tips, exclusive videos, and discounts on services and food items. Your information will *never* be shared or sold to a 3rd party. A former junk-foodist and BBQ addict, Jeff turned his life around by understanding the power of a nutrient-dense, whole foods, plant-strong diet. He's a Nutritional Education Trainer and Holistic Health Coach based in Los Angeles, CA. His mission in life is to help people take their immediate and long-term health into their own hands by beating the crap out of obesity and chronic disease. Continue reading >>

You Did Not Eat Your Way To Diabetes!

You Did Not Eat Your Way To Diabetes!

Don't fall for the toxic myth that you caused your diabetes by reckless overeating. While people with Type 2 diabetes often are seriously overweight, there is accumulating evidence that their overweight is a symptom, not the cause of the process that leads to Type 2 Diabetes. Even so, it is likely that you've been told that you caused your diabetes by letting yourself get fat and that your response to this toxic myth is damaging your health. Blaming you for your condition causes guilt and hopelessness. Even worse, the belief that people with diabetes have brought their disease on themselves inclines doctors to give people with diabetes abysmal care. They assume that since you did nothing to prevent your disease, you won't make the effort to control it. So they ignore your high blood sugars until they have lasted long enough to cause complications and then they prescribe the newest, most expensive, potentially dangerous but heavily marketed drugs, though the drug-maker's own Prescribing Information makes it clear that these drugs cannot lower your blood sugar to the levels that reverse or prevent complications. The myth that diabetes is caused by overeating also hurts the one out of five people who are not overweight when they contract Type 2 Diabetes. Because doctors only think "Diabetes" when they see a patient who fits the stereotype--the grossly obese, inactive patient--they often neglect to check people of normal weight for blood sugar disorders even when they show up with classic symptoms of high blood sugar such as recurrent urinary tract infections or neuropathy. Where Did This Toxic Myth Come From? The way this myth originated is this: People with Type 2 Diabetes often are overweight. And manny people who are overweight have a syndrome called "insulin resistance Continue reading >>

Am I Eating My Way To Gestational Diabetes?

Am I Eating My Way To Gestational Diabetes?

Throughout my last two pregnancies, it was a struggle to eat enough when so many foods repulsed me. This time my nausea has taken a vacation, and suddenly food tastes delicious. As a result, I've started to gain too much weight, too fast. A woman who begins a pregnancy at a normal weight should gain 25 to 35 pounds during the course of her pregnancy, according to the March of Dimes. I have gained almost that much in the last two months aloneand I can't imagine curbing my monster appetite now. Pregnancy has heightened my senses of smell and taste, and I feel like this is my big chance to eat everything I've always wanted to eat. If I can't have a beer, then I might as well get whipped cream on my hot chocolate, right? Not so fast. If I keep gaining weight at this impressive clip, I could put the baby and myself in danger. Not only do I risk high blood pressure and varicose veins, but it's possible I could bring on the dreaded gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes, which affects 4% of all pregnancies, has no unique symptoms. The main indicatorsincreased appetite, thirst, and frequent urinationare identical to pregnancy symptoms. Without a lab test, I have no way of knowing if my baby and I are at risk. This particular type of diabetes strikes when a pregnant woman's pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to maintain safe blood sugar levels. The placenta produces hormones that can make it harder for the body to use insulin, which causes blood glucose levels to spike. In an attempt to lower blood glucose levels, the baby's pancreas will produce more insulin. Babies born with excessive insulin are at higher risk for shoulder damage and breathing problems. Could I give myself diabetes? In order to investigate further, I put down my quart of chocolate peanut butter ice cr Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Give Myself Gestational Diabetes? | Healthpartners Blog

Is It Possible To Give Myself Gestational Diabetes? | Healthpartners Blog

Diane Reader, RDN, CDE | 2 articles Youve been making really good food choices so your baby has the right nutrients to grow healthy and strong. But, sometimes you treat yourself to a big bowl of potato chips or an extra piece of chocolate. Youre pregnant and you deserve it, right? The panic sets in when you find out you have an upcoming test for gestational diabetes . Could eating these treats give me gestational diabetes? If your glucose levels are too high, you may have gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes that only pregnant women can get. Roughly 1 in 20 women have gestational diabetes during their pregnancy. Heres how it works: After you eat, your body turns the food in your stomach into glucose in your bloodstream. Your pancreas then chips in to help. It creates a hormone called insulin, which allows the glucose to go from your bloodstream and into your cells to give you a much-needed energy boost. When youre pregnant, your body needs more insulin than it usually does for this process to happen. If your pancreas cant keep up, the glucose levels in your blood will get too high. This is gestational diabetes. Since your baby shares your bloodstream while in the womb, keeping your glucose levels under control will make sure your baby stays healthy, too. [Click on the image below to enlarge and view it in a new window] Although there are common symptoms for type 1 and type 2 diabetes , such as excessive thirst, frequent urination, fatigue and unintended weight loss, there are typically no symptoms for gestational diabetes. But, there are a few risk factors that your doctor will be on the lookout for in your first trimester. How do I know if I have gestational diabetes? Theres a test for that. There arent any symptoms for gestational diabetes Continue reading >>

Can Consuming Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Can Consuming Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Independently of quantity, consuming sugar (i.e., sucrose) does not cause diabetes. Understand why: “Since the first doctor noticed, hundreds of years ago, that the urine of a diabetic patient tasted sweet, it has been common to call the condition the sugar disease, or sugar diabetes, and since nothing was known about physiological chemistry, it was commonly believed that eating too much sugar had to be the cause, since the ability of the body to convert the protein in tissues into sugar wasn’t discovered until 1848, by Claude Bernard (who realized that diabetics lost more sugar than they took in). Even though patients continued to pass sugar in their urine until they died, despite the elimination of sugar from their diet, medical policy required that they be restrained to keep them from eating sugar. That prescientific medical belief, that eating sugar causes diabetes, is still held by a very large number, probably the majority, of physicians.” “In an earlier newsletter, I wrote about P. A. Piorry in Paris, in 1864, and Dr. William Budd in England, in 1867, who treated diabetes by adding a large amount of ordinary sugar, sucrose, to the patient's diet. Glucose was known to be the sugar appearing in the diabetics' urine, but sucrose consists of half glucose, and half fructose. In 1874, E. Kulz in Germany reported that diabetics could assimilate fructose better than glucose. In the next decades there were several more reports on the benefits of feeding fructose, including the reduction of glucose in the urine. With the discovery of insulin in 1922, fructose therapy was practically forgotten, until the 1950s when new manufacturing techniques began to make it economical to use.” “On a normal diet, his weight was 152 pounds, and his metabolic rate was from 9% to Continue reading >>

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