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Can You Give Humalog Insulin Iv?

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Humulin R Versus Humalog: A Side-by-side Comparison

Diabetes is a disease that causes high blood sugar levels. Left untreated, high blood sugar levels can cause many problems, such as heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney failure, and blindness. Humulin R and Humalog are two different types of insulin that can help lower your blood sugar level. These drugs work in slightly different ways. In general, insulin lowers your blood sugar level by signaling to your muscle and fat cells to use sugar from your blood. It also signals your liver to stop making sugar. Depending on the type and severity of your diabetes, you may need to take insulin. We’ll compare and contrast Humulin R and Humalog to help you decide if one may be a good choice to treat your diabetes. Humulin R is a brand name for regular insulin. It is a short-acting insulin. That means that it takes about 30 minutes to reach your bloodstream and works for about three to six hours. Humalog is a brand name for insulin lispro, which is a fast-acting insulin. It takes about 15 minutes to start working, but it only lasts two to four hours. The following table compares more features of these two drugs. Humulin R Humalog What drug is it? Regular insulin (short-acting insulin) Insulin lispro (fast-acting insulin) What’s it used for? Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Blood sugar control in people with diabetes Do I need a prescription to buy this drug? No Yes Is a generic version available? No No What forms does it come in? Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe Injectable solution, available in a vial for use with a syringe. Injectable solution, available in a cartridge that you use in a device called a KwikPen How much do I take? Your doctor will tell you what dose to inject. This depends on your blood sugar readings and the Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro

Insulin Lispro

Insulin Lispro. Insulin lispro, of recombinant DNA origin, is a human insulin analogue created by reversal of the amino acids at positions 28 and 29 on the human insulin B chain. Insulin lispro was the first insulin analogue to receive approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. It is chemically Lys(B28),Pro(B29) insulin and is created in a special, nonpathogenic laboratory strain of Escherichia coli that has been genetically altered by the addition of the gene for insulin lispro. The effect of this amino acid rearrangement is to reduce the capacity of the insulin to self-aggregate in subcutaneous tissues, resulting in behavior similar to that of monomeric insulin. This leads to lispro's more rapid absorption and shorter duration of action compared with regular insulin when given by subcutaneous injection. However, lispro is not intrinsically more active and on a molar basis is equipotent to human insulin. When they are given by intravenous injection, the pharmacokinetic profiles of lispro and human regular insulin are similar. Because of its rapid onset of action (within 5 to 15 minutes after administration) and peak action within 1 to 2 hours, lispro was the first insulin to mimic the time course of the increase in plasma glucose seen after ingestion of a carbohydrate-rich meal. 6.19.6.5.3.1 Rapid-acting insulin analogs (lispro, aspart, and glulisine) Changes in the amino acid sequence of the insulin analogs lispro, aspart, and glulisine reduce the tendency to self-associate into hexamers, resulting in more rapid onset and a shorter duration of action compared to regular human insulin. Insulin lispro (Humalog) has a reversal of amino acid sequence at the B28 (proline) and B29 (lysine) positions, resulting in insulin lysine-proline. Insulin aspart (Novolog) has Continue reading >>

Humalog (insulin Lispro) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Humalog (insulin Lispro) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Used in the treatment of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus Quicker onset and shorter duration of action when compared to regular insulin Admelog, Admelog SoloStar, Humalog, Humalog Junior KwikPen, Humalog KwikPen Admelog/Humalog/Humalog Junior KwikPen/Humalog KwikPen/Insulin Lispro Subcutaneous Inj Sol: 1mL, 100U, 200U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Insulin lispro is equipotent to regular insulin, but with more rapid activity and a shorter duration of action when given via intermittent subcutaneous injection. The total daily dose is given as 2 to 4 subcutaneous injections, within 15 minutes before or immediately after a meal to avoid hypoglycemia. Total daily insulin requirements vary between patients and depend on the patient's clinical condition and diet; however, a common dosage range is 0.5 to 1 unit/kg/day. In general, 50 to 70% of total daily insulin requirements may be provided by insulin lispro; the remainder should be provided by an intermediate- or long-acting insulin. A common regimen is to administer insulin lispro just prior to the beginning of each meal with a dose of basal insulin (i.e., insulin glargine or insulin detemir) once daily. Insulin lispro can be given in combination with NPH or Lente insulin as 2 daily injections; about two-thirds of the daily insulin dose is given before breakfast and about one-third is given before the evening meal. An intermediate-to-insulin lispro ratio of 2:1 can be given within 5 to 10 minutes of breakfast and an intermediate-to-insulin lispro ratio of 1:1 can be given 5 to 10 minutes before dinner. Alternatively, the evening dose of intermediate insulin can be given at bedtime rather than at dinner. Children and Adolescents 3 years and older Insulin requirements are highly variable and must be individ Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro (intravenous Route, Subcutaneous Route)

Insulin Lispro (intravenous Route, Subcutaneous Route)

Description and Brand Names Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Humalog Lispro-PFC Descriptions Insulin lispro is a fast-acting type of insulin. Insulin is one of many hormones that help the body turn the food we eat into energy. This is done by using the glucose (sugar) in the blood as quick energy. Also, insulin helps us store energy that we can use later. When you have diabetes mellitus, your body cannot make enough or does not use insulin properly. So, you must take additional insulin to regulate your blood sugar and keep your body healthy. This is very important as too much sugar in your blood can be harmful to your health. Insulin lispro starts to work faster than some other types of insulin, and its effects do not last as long. It should act more like the insulin your body would normally produce. Because the effects of insulin lispro are short-acting, your doctor may also prescribe a longer-acting insulin for you to use. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Suspension Copyright © 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Insulin, Lispro - Statpearls - Ncbi Bookshelf

Insulin, Lispro - Statpearls - Ncbi Bookshelf

Insulin lispro is an insulin analog that is FDA-approved for the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus types 1 and 2, to control hyperglycemia. Its off-label uses include treating patients with mild-to-moderate diabetic ketoacidosis, gestational diabetes mellitus, and mild-to-moderate hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state. One unit of insulin lispro has been shown to be as potent as one unit of human insulin in lowering glucose. Insulin lispro is a rapid-acting, human insulin analog that works parenterally to lower blood glucose by regulating the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. Itworks by binding to a glycoprotein receptor specific to insulin on the surface oftarget cells. These receptors are found ona variety of target tissues, including adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and the liver. In adipose tissue, insulin produces free fatty acids by supporting the processing of circulating lipoproteins. This also helps with the synthesis of triglycerides, as well as adipocyte storage. Insulin also directly inhibits the hydrolysis of triglycerides. In the liver, insulin stimulates the synthesis of hepatic glycogen and promotes the synthesis of fatty acids. In skeletal muscle, insulin works to increase the synthesis of protein and glycogen. Insulin prompts the cellular uptake of amino acids and increases cellular permeability to a variety of ions. Lastly, insulin can movie potassium intracellularlyby activating sodium-potassium ATPase. The drug itself is synthesized by using a special non-pathogenic laboratory strain of the bacteria Escherichia coliwhich has been genetically altered by adding the gene for insulin lispro. Human insulin, normally secreted by the pancreas, has the amino acids lysine and proline at positions B28 and B29. Insulin lispro has these am Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Theres pork insulin which is almost nonexistent at this point. Pork insulin differs from human insulin by only two amino acids. Most of the insulin is now bio-genetic insulin (human insulin) which comes from E. coli bacteria. Human insulin is now cheap enough to drive pork insulin out of the market although its still available. Reactions: Lipodystrophy can develop, which is a fat bump under the skin that occurs from constantly injecting from the same place. To prevent this you must rotate the injection sites. U-100: When we administer insulin, we administer it in units. Insulins can come in a variety of unit concentrations but most of them are U-100 insulin. That means 100 units per milliliter. If you look at an insulin syringe, it has number markings on it. Those numbers indicate the units. 1 unit is a tenth of a cc. (1 unit = 0.01cc) U-500: Theres another type of insulin you may see a couple times a year in your patients which is a U-500 insulin. Thats 500 units per ml. These patients have a severe form of diabetes that requires more than 100 units of injection. If the patient needs 150 units of insulin, you dont want to use two injections, so you would use U-500 insulin, which is five times more concentrated and can fit into one syringe. When a pharmacy sends a U500 vial to the nursing floor and it goes in the refrigerator, they put fluorescent stickers all over this vial to warn you that this is U500 insulin. If you draw up 30 units for a patient and its accidentally U500 instead of U100, thats 150 units of insulin and they can become hypoglycemic and die. Ultra-short acting insulin: Lispro (Humalog) works in a matter of minutes and just for an hour or two. Rapid/Short acting insulin: Regular insulin works in a matter of 30+ minutes. Intermediate acting insulin: NP Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro: A Fast-acting Insulin Analog

Insulin Lispro: A Fast-acting Insulin Analog

Research has established the importance of maintaining blood glucose levels near normal in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. Short-acting insulin analogs are designed to overcome the limitations of regular short-acting insulins. Compared with regular human insulin, the analog insulin lispro offers faster subcutaneous absorption, an earlier and greater insulin peak and a more rapid post-peak decrease. Insulin lispro begins to exert its effects within 15 minutes of subcutaneous administration, and peak levels occur 30 to 90 minutes after administration. Duration of activity is less than five hours. Rates of insulin allergy, lipodystrophy, hypoglycemia and abnormal laboratory test results are essentially the same in patients using insulin lispro and in those using regular human insulin. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT)1 established the importance of maintaining near-normal blood glucose levels in patients with type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. In these patients, intensive therapeutic regimens have been found to delay the onset and reduce the progression of microvascular complications by 50 to 75 percent as compared with conventional regimens. Although no large-scale investigations have been completed, smaller studies have reported similar benefits for intensive therapeutic regimens in patients with type 2 (non–insulin-dependent) diabetes.2 Primary care physicians provide medical care for 75 percent of children and 90 to 95 percent of adults with diabetes.3 Regardless of the type of diabetes, improved glycemic control often can be achieved with individualized tools for patient self-management, carefully formulated nutrition plans and the use of alternative insulin regimens.4 Overview of Insulin Insulin is necessary Continue reading >>

Pharmacy Consult: We Accidentally Just Gave Insulin Aspart Iv… Is That Bad?

Pharmacy Consult: We Accidentally Just Gave Insulin Aspart Iv… Is That Bad?

Open the Pyxis or Omnicell or fridge in your ED where insulin is stored. How many different vials are stocked? If you’re like most other EDs in the USA you’ll find a rapid acting insulin (aspart, glulisine, lispro) mainly used for hospital sliding scale regimens, insulin regular (fast acting) for IV use, an insulin mix (NPH or aspart/aspart protamine), and a long acting insulin (glargine or detemir) for maintenance. With similar sounding, appearing and often stored next to each other products, it’s not surprising that insulin is the number 1 drug related to medication errors in US hospitals. Consolidating the insulin products may be a solution, reducing the risk of grabbing the wrong vial. In pharmacy school and in residency, its rammed down your throat that your IV insulin is insulin regular. But there is no conceivable reason why rapid acting insulins (aspart, glulisine or lispro) cannot be given IV. Right in the package insert of all places, IV administration is listed as a route of administration. From an evidence-based perspective, there are two studies that compared the effects of IV aspart to IV regular and IV lispro to IV regular [1,2]. The two studies were methodologically similar. Each conducted in healthy individuals, primarily measured glycemic threshold for onset of the clinically detectable autonomic reaction to hypoglycemia induced by aspart, lispro or regular human insulin and utilized the same dosing of 2 units/kg/min. The blood glucose/time profiles were near identical between the different insulin products – practically speaking, this translates into a 1:1 dose conversion. I have not yet been able to convince anyone in the hospital pharmacy to eliminate insulin regular from the formulary. I suppose there are some valid reasons to have multiple Continue reading >>

Insulin Lispro (intravenous Route, Subcutaneous Route)

Insulin Lispro (intravenous Route, Subcutaneous Route)

A nurse or other trained health professional may give you this medicine. You may also be taught how to give your medicine at home. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin or into a vein. Always double-check both the concentration (strength) of your insulin and your dose. Concentration and dose are not the same. The dose is how many units of insulin you will use. The concentration tells how many units of insulin are in each milliliter (mL), such as 100 units/mL (U-100), but this does not mean you will use 100 units at a time. Each package of insulin lispro contains a patient information leaflet. Read this leaflet carefully and make sure you understand: How to use disposable insulin delivery device. How and when to change the infusion set, cartridge adapter, and insulin in the external insulin pump reservoir. How and when to change the insulin lispro 3 mL cartridge. How to dispose of syringes, needles, and injection devices. It is best to use a different place on the body for each injection (eg, under the skin of your abdomen or stomach, thigh, buttocks, or upper arm). If you have questions about this, contact a member of your health care team. When used as a mealtime insulin, it should be taken within 15 minutes before a meal or immediately after a meal. The insulin solution should look clear and colorless. Do not use insulin lispro if it is cloudy or thickened. When used in an insulin pump: Carefully read and follow the external insulin pump instructions. This insulin should not be mixed with any other insulin or diluted when used in an insulin pump. The insulin lispro in the pump should be changed at least every 7 days and the infusion set and insertion site changed at least every 3 days. If you do not understand how you are to use the insulin pump or have co Continue reading >>

Rapid-acting Analogues

Rapid-acting Analogues

Comments: Must be taken just before or immediately after eating. Chemically, insulin lispro Lys(B28), Pro(B29) is created when the amino acids at positions 28 and 29 on the insulin Beta-chain are reversed. Insulin lispro (Humalog) and insulin aspart (Novolog), when administered intravenously, show pharmacodynamic parameters similar to regular insulin. A dose of lispro insulin peaks in one half the time and double the concentration of a comparable subcutaneous injection of human regular insulin. Lispro insulin should be injected immediately prior to eating (or less than 15 minutes before the meal). Injecting lispro 30-60 minutes before the meal can result in hypoglycemia. NPH: If Humalog is mixed with NPH human insulin, Humalog should be drawn into the syringe first. The injection should be made immediately after mixing. Regular: Compatible but NO support clinically for such a mixture. Draw up Humalog first before drawing up Regular Insulin. If Humalog is mixed with a longer-acting insulin, such as Humulin N or Humulin U, Humalog should be drawn into the syringe first to prevent clouding of the Humalog by the longer-acting insulin. Injection should be made immediately after mixing. Mixtures should not be administered intravenously. Mixing Humalog with Humulin N or U does not decrease the absorption rate or the total bioavailability of Humalog.Mixing Lispro: Lispro insulin may be mixed with NPH, Lente or Ultralente. Any mixture should be given 15 minutes before the meal and immediately after mixing. Humalog is an insulin analog that is indicated in the treatment of patients with diabetes mellitus for the control of hyperglycemia. Humalog has a more rapid onset and a shorter duration of action than Regular human insulin. Therefore, in patients with type 1 diabetes, Humalo Continue reading >>

Medication Errors During Insulin Administration For Patients With Hyperkalemia

Medication Errors During Insulin Administration For Patients With Hyperkalemia

Medication Errors During Insulin Administration for Patients with Hyperkalemia Hyperkalemia is a serious, potentially lethal electrolyte disturbance that requires medical treatment without delay if it is severe enough to cause disturbances in cardiac conduction. Although hyperkalemia treatment guidelines in the literature vary,1 many organizations begin treatment with the administration of one or more intravenous (IV) bolus doses of 50% dextrose and an IV bolus dose of 10 units of insulin. Some organizations use a rapid-acting insulin (i.e., insulin aspart, insulin lispro) rather than short-acting insulin (i.e., regular insulin) because it may decrease the incidence of hypoglycemia, given its shorter half-life.1 When treating hyperkalemia, the potential for errors and patient harm is significant due to the urgency of the treatment, the difficulty in measuring and administering bolus doses of IV insulin, and the risk of treatment-induced hypoglycemia. A 2017 analysis of almost 200 adverse events associated with hyperkalemia treatment showed that delayed treatment and administration of insulin by the wrong route or the wrong dose (mostly overdoses) were the most common types of errors.1 The analysis also showed that, despite the administration of dextrose, hypoglycemia was still a relatively common occurrence often linked to the variability in dextrose and insulin dosing, the type of insulin used, duration of the dextrose and insulin infusion, the sequence of administering the dextrose and insulin, and patient factors such as renal dysfunction. Some episodes of hypoglycemia have also been caused by administering only the insulin portion of the treatment and not the glucose component.2 Delays. Most delays have occurred because treatment was postponed until patients were t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Disaster #21: Dosage Mix-up Consequences

Diabetes Disaster #21: Dosage Mix-up Consequences

A patient in a nursing home with diabetes was put on a feeding tube at noon. At the time her blood glucose level was at 418 and she was given her normal dose of regular insulin. At 2 pm her blood sugar had climbed to 453. The doctor then ordered 10 units of regular insulin to be given intravenously. The nurse took out the 10-milliliter vial of regular insulin and proceeded to give an injection to the resident…. Instead of giving 10 units in an insulin syringe, the nurse gave 10ml by injecting the insulin in an IV tube. Since each milliliter of insulin equals 100 units of insulin, the patient received 1,000 units of insulin at 3 pm instead of the 10 units ordered. The administering nurse recognized the error and immediately reported it to the facility’s assistant director of nursing and its quality assurance nurse. When the resident’s doctor was contacted, the doctor was told the resident got 100 units of insulin instead of 1,000. The medication administration record said the ordered amount, 10 units, had been given at 3 pm, according to the emergency order. By 5:55 pm that night, the resident’s blood sugar had come down to 102. Oxygen was being administered and tube feeding was in progress. Blood sugar was monitored throughout the evening, with a low of 78 at 8:55 pm and a level of 87 at 9:25 pm. At 9:30 pm, the resident didn’t have an audible heart rate and wasn’t breathing. At 9:45 pm, emergency medical workers did CPR, but the resident died. Lesson Learned: This was an event that could have been prevented. Every facility needs to have a plan in place for insulin overdose and what to do, based on how much given. It was obvious that this patient should have been sent to the ER right away. Every staff member of a medical facility needs to be educated on how Continue reading >>

Admelog, Humalog (insulin Lispro) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

Admelog, Humalog (insulin Lispro) Dosing, Indications, Interactions, Adverse Effects, And More

100 units/mL (Humalog KwikPen; Humalog Junior KwikPen 3mL pen or cartridge) KwikPen dose increment: 1 unit; maximum dose/injection is 60 units Junior KwikPen dose increment: 0.5 unit; maximum dose/injection is 30 units Rapid-acting human insulin analogue indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Usual daily maintenance range is 0.5-1 unit/kg/day in divided doses; nonobese may require 0.4-0.6 unit/kg/day; obese may require 0.8-1.2 units/kg/day Intermediate- or long-acting insulin: Approximately one-third of the total daily insulin requirements SC Rapid-acting or short-acting, premeal insulin should be used to satisfy the remainder of the daily insulin requirements Intermediate- or long-acting insulin: 10 units/day SC (or 0.1-0.2 unit/kg/day) at bedtime generally recommended Short-acting insulin: If necessary, start up to 4 units, 0.1 unit/kg SC within 15 min before each meal, or 10% basal dose; if A1C <8%, consider decreasing basal insulin dose by same amount Increase by 1-2 units or 10-15% qWeek or q2Weeks once self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is achieved (ADA guidelines 2018) Dose adjustment and increased frequency of glucose monitoring Coadministration of drugs that increase the risk of hypoglycemia, and drugs that may increase or decrease blood glucose lowering effects Renal and hepatic impairment: May increase risk for hypoglycemia Do not mix SC injection with insulin preparations other than NPH insulin Do not mix IV or continuous SC infusions with any other insulins Do NOT transfer Humalog U-200 from the KwikPen to a syringe for administration; the markings on the insulin syringe will not measure the dose correctly and can result in overdosage and severe hypoglycemia Do NOT perform dose conversion when u Continue reading >>

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