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Can You Get Pip For Diabetic Neuropathy

Scoring Systems To Screen For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Scoring Systems To Screen For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Scoring systems to screen for diabetic peripheral neuropathy School of Public Health, Peking University, Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Beijing, China Shantou University Medical College, Shantou-Oxford Clinical Research Unit, Shantou, Guangdong, China School of Public Health, Peking University, Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Beijing, China School of Public Health, Peking University, Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Beijing, China School of Public Health, Peking University, Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Beijing, China School of Public Health, Peking University, Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Beijing, China Siyan Zhan, Centre for Evidence Based Medicine and Clinical Research, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Peking University, 38 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, 100191, China. [email protected] . Cited by (CrossRef): 1 article Check for updates This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine the diagnostic accuracy of each scoring system as triage to screen for diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) involving limbs within different settings, or as replacement of nerve conduction studies (NCS) for the clinical diagnosis of DPN involving limbs, with NCS as the reference standard. To estimate the relative accuracy of scoring systems for screening DPN involving limbs, with NCS as the reference standard. To assess t Continue reading >>

Why Should We Have To Go Through Atos, Diabetics Get Everything Free!!!

Why Should We Have To Go Through Atos, Diabetics Get Everything Free!!!

Why should we have to go through ATOS, Diabetics get everything free!!! I have been sitting reading blogs and questions and getting more and more enraged. I too am going through yet again another ATOS round (thats the next 4 months of my life gone). Can I ask how many people use this site? Would it be possible to do a poll to find out, then find out how many are still of a working age, even if they've been chucked out of work due to Fibro. How many have other related diseases. When I see that diabetics get loads of stuff free, especially prescriptions and we have to pay over 100 a year for a prepaid. I am sure that most of us would like to be back at work if it was at all possible, but its not. I would rather have my 30K+ a year, two to 3 hols a year, all the things I wanted when I wanted and be able to work for them rather than be thrown on a scrap heap with a mere pittance to exist on and then fight tooth and nail to get any sort of benefit, which usually renders us incapable of anything afterwards. Now I'm not saying diabetics are shirkers, my sis in law is diabetics, but she has far less wrong with her than me, I'm just saying its unfair. Personally I'd like to see Fibro classified like diabetics and all those exempt diseases so we could get the help we need and the money we need without all this fighting. Has anyone taken a petition to Downing Street and asked for us to stop being hassled with ATOS and be classed as unfit for work and able to claim not only ESA Support but also eligible for DLA as well???? I feel a letter to my MP (Nadine Dorries) coming on!!!! Thanks for letting me have my rant, but I am serious and think we should stand up as united whole and make ourselves heard. I am slightly lost for words at this post.. I have fibro plus 5 other conditions . Continue reading >>

Unable To Walk Due To Pain - Should I Apply For Pip?

Unable To Walk Due To Pain - Should I Apply For Pip?

Yes, do claim and do it as soon as possible. How ever long it takes if you do receive the claim you will be paid back pay from when you first call. Pain is a dreadful disability and is not 'just pain'. You have a genuine disability that you need help with and that is exactly wheat our welfare system is for. I cant walk due to pain, thats why I clicked on your post. If it helps, I claimed 3 years ago when less disabled and after a year of faff I received lower mobility of PIP and the daily living bit of PIP. It got worse, and 6 months ago I re did my PIP in hope of receiving the higher mobility which enables me to get access to a power chair. And!!! Yesterday I got the letter!!! I got the higher rate and have an appointment next week to get some more power! At the end f the day, let them decide. Apply, be truthful about your condition (don't try to sound brave ), get it done...then try and forget about it....and see what happens. Oir PIP has really helped with costs like groceries delivered, help with IT as I cant handwrite, wheelchair help etc. Def worth the faff Yes,you are working and find it tough! With PIP you will be able to buy things to help you. My husband and I had the money and over timescooters, wheelchairs, walking aid got better and better, so we used the money to buywhat we needed. Anything to help and makelife easier, even to go to work It wasn't to show off, it was to help.Also, if you don't apply, you could be compounding the pain which may lead to not working or even not being able to go out. Please apply for it. Denny Continue reading >>

Getting Social Security Disability For Peripheral Neuropathy

Getting Social Security Disability For Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy occurs when there is damage to the peripheral nerves, the nerves that carry messages to and from the spinal cord and brain from the rest of the body. When peripheral neuropathy is caused by diabetes mellitus (a common cause), it is called diabetic neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy can also be caused by other metabolic disorders, herpes zoster, HIV, nutritional deficiencies, toxins, cancer (directly or indirectly as a side effect of chemotherapy or radiation), immune disorders, or genetic disorders. Whatever the cause, peripheral neuropathy can be a very debilitating condition that can affect every aspect of an individual's life. Symptoms and Limitations of Peripheral Neuropathy An individual's symptoms depend upon the affected nerves: autonomic, motor, or sensory, and where they are located within the body. Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy that involve the motor nerves might include muscle weakness, loss of coordination, or loss of balance. If an individual's neuropathy involves sensory nerve damage, he or she might experience symptoms such as numbness, tingling, burning, sensitivity to touch, or pain. Neuropathy associated with diabetes mellitus can affect all peripheral nerves. Diabetic neuropathy symptoms might include numbness and tingling of extremities, loss of sensation, muscle weakness, burning or electric pain sensations, and a variety of other symptoms that can affect nearly every body system. Limitations caused by peripheral neuropathy include a lessened ability to walk or stand and control muscle movements. In addition, many individuals who suffer from severe peripheral neuropathy injure themselves without knowing it, and this can lead to infections and even amputations. Chronic pain is also an issue for many people with peripheral neu Continue reading >>

Can I Get Pip With Diabetes

Can I Get Pip With Diabetes

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Discussion in ' Benefits ' started by Toxicblue , Jan 15, 2018 . Hi folks I have just informed the dhss on change of circumstances and they have told me they will be sending forms out for PIP, and then sneakily said that I may not get it, there the one organisation that terrifies me, can anyone help if they have had any dealings with the dhss. Hi folks I have just informed the dhss on change of circumstances and they have told me they will be sending forms out for PIP, and then sneakily said that I may not get it, there the one organisation that terrifies me, can anyone help if they have had any dealings with the dhss. You must be aged 16 to 64 and have a health condition or disability where you: have had difficulties with daily living or getting around (or both) for 3 months expect these difficulties to continue for at least 9 months (unless youre terminally ill with less than 6 months to live) You may get the daily living part of PIP if you need help more than half of the time with things like: You may get the mobility part of PIP if you need help going out or moving around. If you share with us which issues you have from the list above we can try and help. Thanks for the reply I do have other ailments as well as diabetes, I am right handed doesn't help with two fingers missing, plus I have scarring on both lungs I have difficulties breathing and getting about which my nurse as put me on a new inhaler on the market called umeclidinium I think I was a ginny pig for the drug does it help umm? Hard to say early days, years ago it was a points system 14 and over to qualify, and the swines always gave me 13.5 for my missing fingers, and now I have diabet Continue reading >>

Can I Work With Neuropathy?

Can I Work With Neuropathy?

What is Neuropathy? Neuropathy, more commonly called peripheral neuropathy, is a term used to refer to a variety of diseases that cause the peripheral nervous system to malfunction. The peripheral nervous system includes all nerves that are not in the brain or spinal cord and their associated pathways. In some cases, neuropathy develops gradually. In other cases, it comes on quite suddenly. Its major symptoms include a loss of muscle, muscular twitching, weakness, sensory changes, and changes to the autonomic system. Many people with peripheral neuropathy experience muscle spasms and cramping. Other problems commonly associated with peripheral neuropathy include: an irregular heart rate, abnormal blood pressure, loss of perspiration (ability to sweat), numbness, tingling. People with neuropathy sometimes notice a sensation that has been described as being like wearing an invisible sock or glove. In some cases, it also causes extreme touch sensitivity. The Social Security Administration lists peripheral neuropathy in its list of disabling conditions. Because of this, there are specific criteria SSA adjudicators use to determine if your neuropathy is severe enough to qualify you for Social Security Disability benefits. These criteria include paralysis, ataxia, tremor, and involuntary movement in two or more limbs. If you have one or more of these symptoms, you are likely to qualify for Social Security Disability benefits as long as your claim makes this clear. Neuropathy and Your Ability to Perform Physical Work A number of symptoms associated with neuropathy can make it difficult or impossible to perform physical work. Paralysis and ataxia can affect your ability to walk, bend, lift, or perform many of the actions required for physical labor. If you experience touch sens Continue reading >>

Pip Mobility 20m Case Studies

Pip Mobility 20m Case Studies

The following are sample case studies gathered as part of our contribution to the Disability Benefits Consortium PIP 20m consultation response I am physically disabled and have Cerebal Palsy. This affects my walking. I can walk over 20m but not walk 50m repeatedly. I am very concerned that I will lose the higher rate mobility component under PIP. Under the descriptors, only people who cannot walk over 20m repeatedly will get the higher rate. This is obviously a concern to me. I currently receive a car under Motability. This is a huge help to me as it enables me to drive to work, go places, see friends, go to doctor and hospital appointments. If I were to lose Motability, then my independence would be greatly reduced. I would be forced to attempt to catch the bus, which is over 50m away. This would make it extremely difficult for me to get to work. Bus times are not good and trying to walk in bad weather makes it almost impossible. I get tired walking too far, so catching the bus would make me exhausted. Catching the train wouldn't be any better as the station is 2 miles away, meaning I would have to get a taxi, which would be expensive. I also find it difficult getting on trains because of the gap. I feel the Government have changed the walking distance from 50m to 20m for enhanced mobility, as a cost saving exercise only. They clearly want so many taken off the higher rate so they can save money. However, in the long term it won't save them any money. People who lose the higher rate, will then be dependent on other services. Access to Work, NHS, social care and councils will face bigger costs as people will be using these instead of the higher rate. Meaning more budgets will have to be made, costing the Government more money. I feel the Government should go back to th Continue reading >>

Getting Help For Peripheral Neuropathy Social Security Benefits

Getting Help For Peripheral Neuropathy Social Security Benefits

Social Security Disability Benefits for Adults with Peripheral Neuropathy Approximately 20 million people in the United States seek help for peripheral neuropathy. The condition is a result of damage to the peripheral nerves that typically causes pain, numbness, and weakness especially in the feet and hands. One of the most common causes of peripheral neuropathy is diabetes; however, it can also be the result of infections, inherited conditions, metabolic problems, and traumatic injuries. People with peripheral neuropathy often are in severe pain that prevents them from working. The Social Security Administration (SSA) administers two financial programs to help people suffering with peripheral neuropathy. What are SSDI and SSD? The SSA has two programs available for people with disabilities. SSI (Supplemental Security Income) is a program that assists low to no-income individuals who are unable to work due to a disability. SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) has no asset limitation, but requires that you worked prior to becoming disabled. The number of years you must work prior to becoming disabled is based on your age. Younger applicants are not expected to have worked as long as an applicant who is age 60 or older. If you meet the technical qualifications of SSDI or SSI, you will then need to meet the medical qualifications. To determine if your condition medically meets or exceeds the definition of a disability, the SSA uses a written set of guidelines referred to as the “Blue Book.” What is the SSA’s Blue Book? In order to assess whether a patient is disabled due to peripheral neuropathy, the claims examiner uses the information in the SSA’s Blue Book. The Blue Book contains a list of physical and mental impairments that may qualify as a disability. Continue reading >>

Neuropathy And Filing For Disability

Neuropathy And Filing For Disability

How to Prove you are disabled and win your disability benefits 1) Neuropathy refers to damage to the nervous system. The central nervous system includes just the brain and spinal cord; therefore allother nerves are part of the peripheral nervous system. 2) Cranial neuropathy refers the nerves in the head, including the eye (optic neuropathy) and ears (auditory neuropathy). Peripheralneuropathy is more widespread, as it refers to nerve damage in any part of the peripheral nervous system, most commonly affectingextremities, like your hands, legs and feet. 3) Peripheral neuropathy causes sensations of numbness, tingling and pain in the fingers and toes that gets worse over time and can spreadall the way up the legs and arms. 4) Neuropathy may also cause problems with coordination, muscle weakness and even paralysis, and difficulty with bodily processes likedigestion and excretion. Specific symptoms vary based on the specific affected nerves. 5) This nerve damage can be caused by disease, illness, injury or infection. Trauma or pressure can also cause damage to the nervesinvolved, such as in the case of a broken leg (trauma) and the time spent in a cast (pressure). 6) Diabetes and autoimmune diseases are a common cause of neuropathy and diabetes in particular often causes damage to a variety of nervessimultaneously. Kidney and liver disease may also cause damage to peripheral nerves. 7) Tumors, particularly those occurring on a nerve, and chemotherapy used to treat cancers can cause neuropathy. Chemotherapy is one ofmany toxins that may lead to the condition. In addition, alcoholism and vitamin deficiencies can be causes as well. 8) It is important to treat the underlying cause of the neuropathy, which can also sometimes can help lesson symptoms. Traditional painmedication Continue reading >>

Personal Independence Payment (pip)

Personal Independence Payment (pip)

PIP is a benefit for people with care needs for long term illnesses Personal Independence Payment is a benefit that aims to help people with the costs associated with a long term health conditions that limit the ability to comfortable live or move. PIP was introduced on 10 June 2013 and has replaced Disability Living Allowance for people that are between 16 and 64. DLA is still available to apply for children under 16. The starting entry criteria for PIP are as follows: Have a long term health condition, which may include diabetes, if it causes difficulties with daily living or mobility Your eligibility to then receive the benefit will depend on whether your specific needs are sufficient. Standard level for those whose daily living and mobility is limited Enhanced level for those whose mobility and daily living is severely limited The table below lays out how much you will receive per week depending on which level you are assessed at. The rates in the table are weekly rates and will be free from tax. Note: Figures correct as of 8 August 2013 You will need to fill out an application form and have an assessment. The application form includes questions on how your daily living is affected and how your mobility is affected by any physical, unseen or mental health conditions you have. For the questions you answer, you will be given a score between 0 and 12. Note that the maximum score available on each question can vary. The assessment will usually be a face to face meeting with a health professional employed by either Atos or Capita. Questions will be asked about your daily living ability on the following subjects: Mobility difficulties includes questions on the following: How difficult it is for you to plan and follow a journey Whether you are able to stand and how far yo Continue reading >>

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

There’s a lot to take in when you, or someone you love, is diagnosed with diabetes. Finding out what benefits you might be entitled to, now or in future, may not be top of your to-do list so here’s a quick overview. Is diabetes a disability? Under the 2010 Equality Act, type 1 diabetes is defined as a disability, in that it may have a ‘substantial, long-term, negative impact on a person’s ability to carry out normal, day-to-day activities’. Many people with type 2 diabetes are also covered by this definition. The aim is protect you from discrimination, such as needing time out during the working day to check your blood sugar levels or recover from a 'hypo' (low blood sugar) episode. It sounds confusing, but if your diabetes is being controlled by medication or diet, the impact of your condition on ‘normal activities’ is decided as if you were not taking medication or following a managed diet i.e. if you were not taking insulin to treat type 1 diabetes, this would have a severe impact on your abilities (it could even be fatal) and so is considered a disability. What can I claim for? If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you will be eligible for certain benefits, depending on the extent to which your condition affects your life. For example, everyone in the UK with diabetes is entitled to free eye checks from the age of 12 – once yearly screening for diabetic retinopathy. And if you’re on any medication for your diabetes, you’ll receive free prescriptions. There are additional benefits available to those with diabetes related to disability and long-term health, such as if you need help or if you’re unable to work. Whether or not you’re eligible depends on factors like additional health issues and how much diabetes affects your day-to-day ac Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability Benefits For Neuropathy

Social Security Disability Benefits For Neuropathy

Neuropathy and Social Security Benefits If you suffer from neuropathy and it is so severe it impacts your ability to work, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. Neuropathy is a rather generalized term. It can represent any or all diseases or malfunctions of the peripheral nervous system. Most commonly, it is called peripheral neuropathy. All nerves and nerve pathways located outside the spinal cord and brain form the peripheral nervous system. Your neuropathy could have developed gradually or it could have been sudden onset, and symptoms vary significantly from individual to individual. There are three ways to characterize neuropathy. It can be characterized by the kind of nerve that has been damaged, the location of the nerve damage within your body, and the disease process that causes it. There are three main kinds of peripheral nerves – sensory nerves that control our senses, motor nerves that control voluntary movement, and autonomic nerves that control involuntary movement. Nerve damage that impacts on region of the body is mononeuropathy. Damage that occurs in many areas is called polyneuropathy. If you have symmetric neuropathy you are suffering from a disorder that is occurring in the same places on both sides of the body. The disease process can be diabetic neuropathy, which is caused by diabetes. If it has an unidentified cause, it is called idiopathic neuropathy. It can be caused by many things, including inflammation, medications, liver failure, vitamin deficiencies, alcoholism, metabolic disorders, medications, vitamin deficiencies, and more. Regardless of the cause, neuropathy can be a very debilitating disorder that can impact multiple aspects of an individual’s life. It can impact your ability to stand, walk, carry items, or li Continue reading >>

Here Are Some Conditions That Don't Make You

Here Are Some Conditions That Don't Make You "really Disabled" According To Theresa May's Policy Chief

Here are some conditions that don't make you "really disabled" according to Theresa May's policy chief George Freeman has now expressed "regret" for comments claiming a PIP benefit shake-up would "get money to really disabled people who need it" Get politics updates directly to your inbox Could not subscribe, try again laterInvalid Email Theresa May's policy chief dismissed a 3.7bn disability benefits shake-up as "tweaks" to make sure cash goes to the "really disabled". There was outrage when Tory MP George Freeman, who leads the Downing Street policy unit, made the comments to back emergency laws that will stop Personal Independence Payment (PIP) being expanded for 165,000 people. "These tweaks are actually to do with rolling back some bizarre decisions through the tribunals that now mean benefits are given to people who take pills at home, who suffer from anxiety," he claimed. "We want to get the money to the really disabled people who need it." With a Tory backlash and a bid to kill the law mounting, Mr Freeman has now "expressed regret" though not apologised - after this article was published. The apology, which we've updated this article to include (below), said: "I hugely regret if my comment... inadvertently caused any offence." So what are the actual conditions he was talking about? As luck would have it, analysis by none other than the Department for Work and Pensions (DWP) tells us. Theresa May is facing pressure over the changes slipped out during a by-election (Image: AFP) The row is about two tribunal judgements which said the government should hand more cash to 165,000 people in certain situations. The DWP has laid down emergency laws to stop those tribunals taking effect, because the new payments would cost 3.7bn by 2022. While drawing up the laws, the D Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Charcot Foot And Disability Benefits

Charcot Foot And Disability Benefits

This post discusses Charcot Foot and disability benefits. If Charcot Arthropathy is affecting your ability to work, read on for how SSA will evaluate your disability claim. Charcot foot is a deformity that arises from nerve damage (neuropathy) in the foot or ankle. Neuropathy is frequently associated with diabetes, but neuropathy can occur without diabetes as well. Neuropathy affects foot sensation which in turn increases the likelihood of injury. Via WebMD. In my clients with Charcot Foot, they usually have sustained a foot or ankle injury that refuses to heal. Charcot Foot starts off as an inflammatory process at the injury site. There may or may not be pain due to loss of sensation from neuropathy. The affected bone can undergo destruction, subluxation, dislocation, and eventually deformity. “Rocker bottom” foot (midfoot collapse) is the most common deformity. Via American Diabetes Association. Symptoms of Charcot foot begin as a warm, red, and swollen foot/ankle. Testing can include an x-ray or MRI. Treatment depends on what stage of Charcot Foot you are in (acute or chronic). Immobilization/protection, drug therapy and surgery are all treatment options. Via National Institutes of Health. The Social Security Administration can evaluate a claim for disability based on Charcot foot in different ways. One possibility is Listing 1.02 Major Dysfunction of a joint (due to any cause); another possibility for those over the age of 50 is being found disabled on the Grids. Unfortunately, SSA no longer has a listing specifically for diabetes. If you are unable to work due to Charcot foot, file a claim for disability benefits as soon as possible. The Bishop Law Firm represents clients in Raleigh, Cary, Durham and surrounding areas in North Carolina. Give us a call today for Continue reading >>

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