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Can You Get Disability If You Have Diabetes?

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Disability Determination For Diabetes

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, is a disorder in which too little insulin is produced in the body. Insulin is necessary to help convert glucose (a form of sugar) into the body's cells for energy. When not enough insulin is produced, it causes a build up of glucose in the blood. Symptoms of diabetes include fatigue, frequent urination, abnormal thirst, unusual hunger, weight loss, repeated infections, cuts that are slow to heal, and tingling or numbness in the hands and feet. Type 1 diabetes is ordinarily diagnosed in children and younger adults, and it is a type of diabetes in which the body produces no insulin. In type 2 diabetes, or adult onset diabetes, your body's cells ignore the effects of insulin. When diabetes goes untreated and too much glucose builds up in your body, long-term complications can result. These include neuropathy in your feet (nerve damage and a loss of feeling), kidney disease (nephropathy), high blood pressure (hypertension), heart disease, stroke, gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage in which food stays too long in the stomach), eye and vision problems, peripheral arterial disease (blood vessels in your legs become blocked and blood flow is decreased), a Continue reading >>

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  1. MAYS

    Can I Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes?

    If you have diabetes, Social Security disability benefits may be available. To determine whether you are disabled by diabetes, the Social Security Administration first considers whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal a listing at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process.
    If your diabetes is not severe enough to equal or meet a listing, the Social Security Administration must assess your residual functional capacity (RFC) (the work you can still do, despite your diabetes), to determine whether you qualify for benefits at Step 4 and Step 5 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. See Residual Functional Capacity Assessment for Diabetes.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes.htm
    How to Get Disability Benefits for Diabetes by Meeting a Listing
    To determine whether you are disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process, the Social Security Administration will consider whether your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing.
    The Social Security Administration has developed a set of rules called Listing of Impairments for most common impairments. The listing for each impairment describes a degree of severity that the Social Security Administration presumes would prevent a person from performing substantial work. If your diabetes is severe enough to meet or equal the diabetes listing, you will be eligible for disability benefits.
    The listing for diabetes is 9.08, which has three parts: A, B, and C. You will be disabled if you meet either part A, part B, or Part C.
    http://www.jamesdisabilitylaw.com/diabetes-2.htm
    Equaling a Listing With a Combination of Impairments from Diabetes
    Diabetes mellitus is a multi-faceted disease.
    Even if you don’t meet one of the diabetes listings, you may still be found disabled at Step 3 of the Sequential Evaluation Process. You may have a combination of impairments that together equal the severity of disability of a listing. For example, you may have autonomic neuropathy with hospitalizations for gastric paralysis or dizziness from low blood pressure related to autonomic insufficiency affecting the arterial vascular bed; or an enlarged heart, with coronary artery disease, etc

  2. Mirena

    I thought about applying for SSI. But I don't think I would qualify since I am able body and working.

  3. jayabee52

    yes, diabetes is not BY ITSELF cause for ssi.

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