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Can You Get Diabetes If You Exercise

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes And Exercise: When To Monitor Your Blood Sugar

Exercise is an important part of any diabetes treatment plan. To avoid potential problems, check your blood sugar before, during and after exercise. Diabetes and exercise go hand in hand, at least when it comes to managing your diabetes. Exercise can help you improve your blood sugar control, boost your overall fitness, and reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke. But diabetes and exercise pose unique challenges, too. To exercise safely, it's crucial to track your blood sugar before, during and after physical activity. You'll learn how your body responds to exercise, which can help you prevent potentially dangerous blood sugar fluctuations. Before exercise: Check your blood sugar before your workout Before jumping into a fitness program, get your doctor's OK to exercise — especially if you've been inactive. Talk to your doctor about any activities you're contemplating, the best time to exercise and the potential impact of medications on your blood sugar as you become more active. For the best health benefits, experts recommend at least 150 minutes a week of moderately intense physical activities such as: Fast walking Lap swimming Bicycling If you're taking insulin or medications that can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), test your blood sugar 30 minutes before exercising. Consider these general guidelines relative to your blood sugar level — measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Lower than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Your blood sugar may be too low to exercise safely. Eat a small snack containing 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates, such as fruit juice, fruit, crackers or even glucose tablets before you begin your workout. 100 to 250 mg/dL (5.6 to 13.9 mmol/L). You're good to go. For most people, this is a safe pre-exercise Continue reading >>

Can I Develop Diabetes Even If I Exercise And Eat A Healthy Diet?

Can I Develop Diabetes Even If I Exercise And Eat A Healthy Diet?

Can I develop diabetes even if I exercise and eat a healthy diet? Dr. Jack Merendino, MD on behalf of The Best Life The answer, unfortunately, is yes. Genetics is the largest factor affecting whether you are going to develop diabetes. If you have a very strong family history of diabetes, it may be difficult for you to prevent the development of diabetes altogether. The second major risk factor, of course, is obesity. Diabetes may also be triggered by taking certain medications, especially anti-inflammatory steroids like prednisone or dexamethasone. These drugs are used to treat many autoimmune or inflammatory conditions, including many forms of arthritis, asthma and other conditions. Maintaining a normal body weight, eating right and exercising regularly will help delay the development of the diabetes, even in someone who has a strong hereditary tendency for the disease. For example, someone who is genetically programmed to develop diabetes at a normal body weight when he is, say, age 65, might develop diabetes at 45 if he is substantially overweight. So exercise and proper diet will help prevent the development of diabetes as early as it otherwise would occur. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

Type 2 Diabetes And Exercise

When you have type 2 diabetes, physical activity is an important component of your treatment plan. It’s also important to have a healthy meal plan and maintain your blood glucose level through medications or insulin, if necessary. If you stay fit and active throughout your life, you’ll be able to better control your diabetes and keep your blood glucose level in the correct range. Controlling your blood glucose level is essential to preventing long-term complications, such as nerve pain and kidney disease. Exercise has so many benefits, but the biggest one is that it makes it easier to control your blood glucose (blood sugar) level. People with type 2 diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, either because their body doesn’t produce enough insulin to process it, or because their body doesn’t use insulin properly (insulin resistant). In either case, exercise can reduce the glucose in your blood. Muscles can use glucose without insulin when you’re exercising. In other words, it doesn’t matter if you’re insulin resistant or if you don’t have enough insulin: when you exercise, your muscles get the glucose they need, and in turn, your blood glucose level goes down. If you’re insulin resistant, exercise actually makes your insulin more effective. That is—your insulin resistance goes down when you exercise, and your cells can use the glucose more effectively. Exercise can also help people with type 2 diabetes avoid long-term complications, especially heart problems. People with diabetes are susceptible to developing blocked arteries (arteriosclerosis), which can lead to a heart attack. Exercise helps keep your heart healthy and strong. Plus, exercise helps you maintain good cholesterol—and that helps you avoid arteriosclerosis. Additionally, there ar Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention And Risk Factors: What You Can And Can’t Avoid

Diabetes Prevention And Risk Factors: What You Can And Can’t Avoid

There are a number of risk factors for diabetes, and, depending on the type, there are also ways to prevent the disease. Even when it’s not possible to prevent diabetes, there are ways to lessen its effects. If you have Type I diabetes, managing your condition is the main focus. This type of diabetes comes about from a lack of insulin production in the body, and is generally not considered to be preventable. Type II diabetes, however, can be caused by lifestyle choices. That means you can make changes that can improve or even reverse your condition, or stop you from getting diabetes in the first place. For purposes of this article, the focus will be on Type II diabetes. Tobacco Use Can Be a Factor People who smoke are more likely to be diabetic. While there isn’t necessarily a direct link between tobacco and diabetes, people who smoke usually have less healthy lifestyles than non-smokers. That’s not always the case, of course. There are even athletes who occasionally smoke a cigarette. But most people who smoke, especially those who smoke heavily, lead lives burdened by other unhealthy habits. This can include drinking too much, overeating, not getting adequate rest, and working jobs that are stressful or hard on the body. For that reason, smoking may help reduce diabetes risk. When people quit smoking, it’s often as part of a lifestyle change that will help them be healthier and feel better about themselves overall. This can give them the incentive they need to lose weight, get more exercise, get better sleep, and even see their doctor more frequently. With that in mind, it’s important to note that quitting tobacco, in and of itself, isn’t necessarily proven to reduce the risk of diabetes. But anything that makes you healthier overall can reduce your chance Continue reading >>

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Thin People Get Type 2 Diabetes?

Almost 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese, according to government statistics, and it's known that carrying excess weight ups your diabetes risk. The reason is that fat interferes with your ability to use insulin — insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells, which need the sugar for energy. But don't think you're off the hook if you're thin — you still can be at risk for type 2 diabetes, even if you're not heavy. The risk for developing type 2 diabetes may be smaller if you're thin, but it's still real, especially if you're older, says Christopher Case, MD, who specializes in endocrinology in Jefferson City, Mo. It's not known exactly how many thin or normal-weight people have type 2 diabetes, but part of that may be because there is no standard definition for "thin," Dr. Case says. "They may not look obese," Case says, but any excess weight, especially around the stomach, is a risk factor. One of the reasons people can have high blood sugar and develop diabetes whether they're thin or obese is because weight, though a contributing factor, is not the only factor. Type 2 Diabetes Could Be in Your Genes Genetics plays a role in developing type 2 diabetes. Studies show that people who have a close relative (parent or sibling) with type 2 diabetes have a greater than three times higher risk of developing the disease than those with no family history, Case says. Genetics may explain why some people who are thin develop type 2 diabetes and why an obese person might not, he says. African-Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and Native Americans also are at greater risk for type 2 diabetes. Lifestyle Choices Raise Your Diabetes Risk These other risk factors, often associated with people who are overweight, can plague thin people, too Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Exercise

Diabetes And Exercise

Your health care provider should make sure your exercise program is safe for you. If you take medicines that lower your blood sugar, exercise can make your blood sugar go too low. Talk to your provider or nurse about how to take your medicines when you exercise. Some types of vigorous exercise can make your eyes worse if you already have diabetic eye disease. Get an eye exam before starting a new exercise program. After you start your exercise program, call your provider if you have any of the following: Feel faint, have chest pain, or feel short of breath when you exercise Feel pain or numbness in your feet. Also call if you have sores or blisters on your feet Your blood sugar gets too low or too high during the day Start with walking. If you are out of shape, start by walking for 5 to 10 minutes a day. Try to set a goal of fast walking. You should do this for 30 to 45 minutes, at least 5 days a week. In order to lose weight, the amount of exercise may need to be greater. So do more if you can. Swimming or exercise classes are also good. Wear a bracelet or necklace that says you have diabetes. Tell coaches and exercise partners that you have diabetes. Always have fast-acting sources of sugar with you, such as juice or hard candy. Carry a cell phone with emergency phone numbers with you, as well. Drink plenty of water. Do this before, during, and after exercising. Try to exercise at the same time of day, for the same amount of time, and at the same level. This will make your blood sugar easier to control. If your schedule is less regular, exercising at different times of the day is still better than not exercising at all. Try to avoid sitting for more than 30 minutes at a time. Check your blood sugar before you exercise. Also, check it during exercise if you are working Continue reading >>

Exercising With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercising With Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise may do more things for you than you realize, if you have diabetes . You probably already know that it's good for your heart , and that it can help you lose weight . But did you know that it will lower your blood sugar levels by prompting your body to use insulin more effectively? It may also help you need less medication , insulin , or other therapies. Over time, it can help your A1c level, which reflects your blood sugar control over the past 3 months. Plus, exercise makes you less likely to get heart disease , and it can help you lose weight when coupled with dieting . Your doctor will make sure you're ready for whatever you want to do. Just a few things, like lifting heavy weights, can be dangerous if diabetes has damaged the blood vessels in your eyes , or if you have cataracts or glaucoma . And if you have diabetes-related nerve damage in your feet, you may need to choose activities that don't put too much pressure on your feet. There will still be plenty of things you can do. Your doctor should be able to advise you on what you can do, and may also recommend taking an exercise stress test . You can generally do just about any type of exercise you enjoy when you have diabetes. Walking, jogging , bicycling, swimming , and other cardio activities are great for torching calories and getting your heart pumping. Your goal: Build up to at least 150 minutes per week of moderate aerobic activity. 3. Add some strength training to your routine twice a week. Using weights or working with resistance bands helps build muscle. More muscle activity also boosts your metabolism , so you'll burn more calories throughout the day and night, even after your workout. Be sure to ask your doctor about how any medicine you're taking might affect you during exercise. Some drugs ma Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only cause of weight gain. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy them sometimes. People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is not Continue reading >>

Eat Healthily And Exercise Regularly? You Can Still Get Type 2 Diabetes: One In 10 Diagnosed With Condition Found To Be Perfectly Normal Weight

Eat Healthily And Exercise Regularly? You Can Still Get Type 2 Diabetes: One In 10 Diagnosed With Condition Found To Be Perfectly Normal Weight

And scientists are concerned that some people who look thin might have internal fat wrapped around their organs. Although largely hidden, this fat produces hormones and other substances that affect cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar levels, raising the risk of a host of health problems including diabetes. Research in July by London Metropolitan University found that 15 per cent of healthy weight children had high internal fat. In Type 2 diabetes, which makes up 90 per cent of cases, the body becomes resistant to insulin, the hormone that breaks down sugar in the blood. Sufferers must eat a special diet and monitor their blood sugar. The other 10 per cent of cases are type 1 a condition that prevents insulin being made, and is not tied to weight. In England alone, 3.2million adults are thought to have type 2 diabetes, including 850,000 who have not yet been diagnosed. NHS officials estimate that will soar to 4.6million by 2030. A programmable insulin pump administers insulin continuously through catheter into the subcutaneous fat Diabetes UK studied data on more than 200,000 patients from the National Diabetes Audit and found that almost nine out of ten type 2 sufferers had a body mass index of more than 25 classed as being overweight. More than half of those who had been newly diagnosed were obese. But 11.3 per cent were of normal weight. Barbara Young, of Diabetes UK, said: Crucially, we need to make sure that people identified as being high risk are then given the support they need to make the lifestyle changes that can help prevent it. She said obesity was still the main driver, adding: Diabetes has become a national health emergency. These new findings show we will only ever begin to turn back the rising tide of type 2 diabetes if we finally get to grips w Continue reading >>

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Is Type 2 Diabetes Reversible?

Type 2 diabetes is a serious, long-term medical condition. It develops mostly in adults but is becoming more common in children as obesity rates rise across all age groups. Several factors contribute to type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor. Type 2 diabetes can be life-threatening. But if treated carefully, it can be managed or even reversed. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. When your blood sugar (glucose) levels rise, the pancreas releases insulin. This causes sugar to move from your blood to your cells, where it can be used as an energy source. As glucose levels in your blood go back down, your pancreas stops releasing insulin. Type 2 diabetes impacts how you metabolize sugar. Either your pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin or your body has become resistant to its effects. This causes glucose to build up in the blood. This is called hyperglycemia. There are several symptoms of untreated type 2 diabetes, including: excessive thirst and urination fatigue increased hunger weight loss, in spite of eating more infections that heal slowly blurry vision dark patches on the skin Treatment for type 2 diabetes includes monitoring your blood sugar levels and using medications or insulin when needed. Doctors also recommend losing weight through diet and exercise. Some diabetes medications have weight loss as a side effect, which can also help reverse diabetes. If you start eating healthier, get more exercise, and lose weight, you can reduce your symptoms. Research shows that these lifestyle changes, especially physical activity, can even reverse the course of the condition. Studies that show the reversal of type 2 diabetes include participants who have lived with the condition for only a few years. Weight loss is the primary fact Continue reading >>

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

11 Exercise Tips For Type 2 Diabetes

Exercise is sure to be on your to-do list if you have diabetes. Get started with these go-to tips: 1. Make a list of fun activities. You have lots of options, and you don't have to go to a gym. What sounds good? Think about something you've always wanted to try or something you enjoyed in the past. Sports, dancing, yoga, walking, and swimming are a few ideas. Anything that raises your heart rate counts. 2. Get your doctor's OK. Let them know what you want to do. They can make sure you're ready for it. They'll also check to see if you need to change your meals, insulin, or diabetes medicines. Your doctor can also let you know if the time of day you exercise matters. 3. Check your blood sugar. Ask your doctor if you should check it before exercise. If you plan to work out for more than an hour, check your blood sugar levels regularly during your workout, so you’ll know if you need a snack. Check your blood sugar after every workout, so that you can adjust if needed. 4. Carry carbs. Always keep a small carbohydrate snack, like fruit or a fruit drink, on hand in case your blood sugar gets low. 5. Ease into it. If you're not active now, start with 10 minutes of exercise at a time. Gradually work up to 30 minutes a day. 6. Strength train at least twice a week. It can improve blood sugar control. You can lift weights or work with resistance bands. Or you can do moves like push-ups, lunges, and squats, which use your own body weight. 7. Make it a habit. Exercise, eat, and take your medicines at the same time each day to prevent low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia. 8. Go public. Work out with someone who knows you have diabetes and knows what to do if your blood sugar gets too low. It's more fun, too. Also wear a medical identification tag, or carry a card that says you Continue reading >>

10 Things To Know About Diabetes & Exercise

10 Things To Know About Diabetes & Exercise

Top 10 Tips for Exercising with Diabetes 1: How your exercise will affect your blood sugar: There are two types of exercise: aerobic (good for your heart) and resistance training (good for your muscles and bones). While both types of exercise are beneficial, each can have a very different impact on your blood sugar. Aerobic exercise, like brisk walking, jogging, or swimming -- anything using large muscle groups at a moderate heart rate for a prolonged period of time -- can require a great deal of sugar for fuel, which can help reduce overall blood sugar levels. Resistance training, also known as anaerobic exercise or interval training, can actually raise your blood sugar. "[Resistance training] consists of short bursts of effort that result in the release of stress hormones and adrenaline, which can trigger a large release of sugar into your blood that was stored in your liver and muscles," says Marcey Robinson, CDE, an exercise physiologist from ACHIEVE Health & Performance in Basalt, Colorado. Other important variables that can affect your blood sugar with exercise: the time of day, your current fitness level, your history of hypoglycemia, and your medications, such as insulin. Robinson recommends checking your blood sugar before, during, and after exercise. Take good notes, and identify the patterns you see developing between your blood sugar and activity levels. 2: Fueling your body with food before exercise is important: While it may seem counterproductive to consume calories before you work out, not eating anything before exercise can lead to low blood sugar, cause your metabolism to slow down, and limit the amount of energy for your workout. Allowing 30-45 minutes after eating a small snack before exercising, and waiting a full hour after larger meals, will give Continue reading >>

Exercise Myths And Facts

Exercise Myths And Facts

Are you confused by all the exercise advice out there? It’s no wonder: With a dozen fitness magazines on the newsstand, a wealth of health and fitness news streaming into your home over the Internet, bogus ads guaranteeing an effortless 40-pound weight loss or bigger muscles in just 10 days, not to mention the free advice from well-intentioned friends, trainers, and the guy on the bench press next to you, there’s a lot of conflicting information to sort through. Unfortunately, many popular fitness tips not only make exercise seem harder and more complicated than it really should be, but they can also lead to injury. To set the record straight and help you exercise safely, here are the facts — nothing but the facts — behind some of the most common exercise myths. You don’t start burning fat until 20 minutes into your workout. This is one of the most popular myths of all time. You may have heard it from a friend or even from a fitness trainer at your gym, but the fact is, muscle burns a combination of fat and carbohydrate (glucose) simultaneously almost all of the time. It’s just that you may burn a higher percentage of one or the other depending on the intensity of the exercise. For example, during high-intensity activities like sprinting or strenuous weight lifting, which get you out of breath, your muscles are burning a higher percentage of carbohydrate than fat (perhaps as much as 80% to 90% carbohydrate and 10% fat). At rest and during light-intensity physical activity (such as moderate-paced walking), when breathing is easier, the percentage could change to 70% fat and 30% carbohydrate. Why does this happen? As you start to exercise, fat and carbohydrate are released from storage sites in the body as well as from the bloodstream and enter the working mus Continue reading >>

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Regular and safe physical activity is especially important for people with diabetes. Blood Sugar and Exercise The most common concern people have about exercise and diabetes is how to keep their blood sugar levels from getting too high or too low. Here are some general guidelines to follow: Exercise at the same time every day, if possible. This will help you find out how exercise affects your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before exercising. If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you start to exercise, eat a carbohydrate snack. If your blood sugar is 250 or higher, don't start exercising until your blood sugar level is under 250. Exercise with a friend who knows that you have diabetes and knows how to help if your blood sugar gets too low. Make sure you have ID with you that lets people know you have diabetes. If you're sick or have an infection, don't exercise until you're feeling better. Being sick affects your blood sugar. Taking insulin or diabetes pills to lower blood sugar Blood sugar can go too low (hypoglycemia) during exercise if you take too much insulin, the insulin is absorbed too quickly, or the insulin peaks during exercise. It can also happen if you take insulin or pills and don't eat enough carbohydrate. Here are some things you can do: If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you exercise, eat at least 30 grams of carbohydrate before you begin. This will help keep your blood sugar level from dropping too low during exercise. Bring a carbohydrate snack with you whenever you exercise in case your blood sugar level drops too low during or right after you exercise. If your exercise will last for more than an hour, check your blood sugar after each hour of exercise. If your blood sugar is 100 or less, you should eat a carbohydrate snack. Check y Continue reading >>

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