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Can You Get Diabetes From Sweets?

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

A: Not specifically. But too much of any unhealthy food can make you fat, which can cause diabetes. Our expert: Prof Ian Caterson It's a warning that rings harshly in the ear of anyone with a sweet tooth. You're about to tuck into a bag of your favourite lollies when someone shrieks in horror: "Don't eat those! You'll get diabetes!!" But do high-sugar foods really pose this risk? It's true that diabetes is a disease where there's too much glucose — a type of sugar — in your blood. But just because you have high blood sugar doesn't mean eating a lot of sugar is what got you there, says Ian Caterson, Boden Professor of Human Nutrition at the University of Sydney. In fact, the notion there's a direct link between eating sugar and developing diabetes is a myth, Caterson says. However, eating too many sugary foods can lead to weight gain, a key trigger for the most common form of diabetes: type 2. But so can eating too much of many other unhealthy foods, not just those high in sugar. "It is more being overweight — particularly around the waist — that is linked with type 2 diabetes than any particular food you eat," he says. Body fat and insulin Weight gain can lead to diabetes because extra body fat causes chemical changes in your body. "We used to think fat was just a storage tissue but we now know it's more than that," Caterson says. It's an active tissue which produces hormones — chemical messengers that influence processes in the body, he says. In particular, hormones produced by fat influence the activity of another hormone, insulin, which controls the uptake of glucose from your blood. Glucose is the body's main source of energy and it comes from carbohydrates such as potatoes, bread, pasta and rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is rele Continue reading >>

Myth: Sugar Causes Diabetes

Myth: Sugar Causes Diabetes

We all know the stereotype – if you’ve got diabetes, you must have eaten too much sugar. But, with this sweet ingredient found in so much of our food – and, recently, so many of our newspapers – what’s the truth about sugar? And how does it affect diabetes? What is sugar? Sugar is found naturally in fruit, vegetables and dairy foods. It’s also added to food and drink by food manufacturers, or by ourselves at home. The debate about sugar and health is mainly around the ‘added sugars’. This includes: table sugar that we add to our hot drinks or breakfast cereal caster sugar, used in baking sugars hidden in sauces, ready meals, cakes and drinks. Does sugar cause diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes – Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. In Type 1 diabetes, the insulin producing cells in your pancreas are destroyed by your immune system. No amount of sugar in your diet – or anything in your lifestyle – has caused or can cause you to get Type 1 diabetes. With Type 2 diabetes, though we know sugar doesn’t directly causes Type 2 diabetes, you are more likely to get it if you are overweight. You gain weight when you take in more calories than your body needs, and sugary foods and drinks contain a lot of calories. And it's important to add that fatty foods and drinks are playing a part in our nation's expanding waistline. So you can see if too much sugar is making you put on weight, then you are increasing your risk of getting Type 2 diabetes. But Type 2 diabetes is complex, and sugar is unlikely to be the only reason the condition develops. If I have diabetes, can I eat sugar? Having diabetes doesn’t mean you have to cut sugar out of your diet completely. We all enjoy eating sugary foods occasionally, and there’s no problem including them as a treat Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Trigger: Does Eating Sugar Really Cause It?

Type 2 Diabetes Trigger: Does Eating Sugar Really Cause It?

Since 1996 the number of people with diabetes has doubled, and soon the UK’s total will reach five million, according to Diabetes UK. The condition happens when glucose - a simple sugar found in many carbohydrates - can’t enter the body’s cells to be used as fuel. For type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition, the body attacks and destroys insulin-reducing cells, causing glucose to quickly rise in the blood. In type 2 diabetes - which is what 90 per cent of diabetics have - glucose levels go up because the body doesn’t make enough insulin, or the insulin it makes doesn’t work properly. Many experts argue sugar alone does not trigger the condition, but new research suggests there might be a link. Unsurprisingly, high sugar consumption has been associated with diabetes. Many experts argue sugar alone does not trigger the condition, but new research suggests there might be a link. According to Diabetes UK, no amount of sugar in your diet has caused or can cause you to develop type 1. Sugar doesn’t directly cause type 2 diabetes either, but you are more likely to get it if you’re overweight. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. In fact, almost 90 per cent of those with type 2 are overweight or obese. This mean that because sugary food and drink can cause weight gain, it may also lead to diabetes. There’s other evidence to suggest increased availability of sugar makes diabetes more common - a 2013 study found more sugar in a country’s food supply increased diabetes rates. Importantly, they discovered for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person diabetes levels rose o Continue reading >>

Low Sugar Sweets

Low Sugar Sweets

Tweet A number of seasonal holidays have close associations with sugary sweets but thankfully there are ways to reduce exposure to sugar without diminishing the fun factor. We present a list of options which are relatively low in sugar and should help to make diabetes control easier to achieve over a festive evening. Sugar free sweets Sugar free sweets are available and are an option for people with diabetes. It’s worth checking which sweetener is used within the sweets as sugar alcohols (such as sorbitol, maltitol, erythritol and xylitol) can have laxative effects if taken in too high quantities. The other note is that sugar alcohols may raise blood glucose levels, albeit less severely than sugar. The effect on sugar levels can vary from one sugar alcohol to another. Sorbitol, erythritol and mannitol should have a relatively benign effect on blood glucose levels but it’s best to check blood glucose levels an hour or so after having the sweets to check their effect. Lower sugar substitutes Aside from sugar free sweets, you can also use some creativity to make treats that aren’t too intensely sweet. Baking low sugar cakes Cakes are popular whatever the occasion and needn’t be ruled by those of us needing to watch our carbohydrate intake. Sweeteners can be used instead of sugar and almond meal can also be used instead of flour to help lower the carbohydrate impact in foods such as cakes. Popcorn Movie favourite popcorn is another snack that is closely associated with fun and good times. Unsweetened popcorn is about 50% carbohydrate by weight so a 30g serving, which makes for a decent portion, will have 15g of carbs. Butter popcorn makes for a more wholesome and less addictive experience than salted or sweetened varieties. Toffee apples Toffee apples are often very Continue reading >>

Are Small Amounts Of Sweets Ok?

Are Small Amounts Of Sweets Ok?

Doctors used to think sugars were terrible for diabetes. Then the American Diabetes Association (ADA) changed their minds. They said it’s the carbs that matter, and sugars were just another carb. Now some scientists are saying sugar is poison. Who’s right? In 2006, Amy Campbell laid out the official ADA position here, in a piece subtitled “fitting sugar into your meal plans.” “We now know,” she wrote, “that for the most part, it’s the total amount of carbohydrate, not the type of carbohydrate that you eat, that affects blood glucose levels. This means that the same amount of carbohydrate from any carbohydrate-containing food affects blood glucose levels in pretty much the same way.” ADA’s own Web site says something similar: “The total amount of carbohydrate you eat affects blood glucose levels more than the type. Now experts agree that you can substitute small amounts of sugar for other carbohydrate-containing foods into your meal plan and still keep your blood glucose levels on track.” They give the example of taking a slice of bread off your turkey sandwich to make room for some cookies. ADA does caution that “drinking sugary drinks is linked to Type 2 diabetes, and the ADA recommends that people limit their intake of sugar-sweetened beverages to help prevent diabetes.” Is sugar really just another carb? Some experts say no way. Quinn Phillips wrote here in 2011 about how researchers like Dr. Robert Lustig, an obesity expert at the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, are saying sugars, especially fructose, have toxic effects in the kidneys and liver. Lustig believes our high sugar intake is responsible for the recent increases we have seen in the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome (the coexistence of insulin resi Continue reading >>

Ate Too Much Sugar? 9 Tricks To Help Reverse The Binge

Ate Too Much Sugar? 9 Tricks To Help Reverse The Binge

Step 1: Realize what's going on ivosevicv/iStock One moment you're wired; the next, you're making a beeline to the couch. What gives? Your body goes on a physical and emotional roller coaster after too many sweets. "The minute you put a sweet in your mouth, you get a surge of dopamine, a feel-good hormone with addictive properties," says Amanda Bontempo, RD, a nutritionist at NYU Langone's Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center. As sugar floods your bloodstream, the pancreas releases insulin to control blood glucose levels. This suppresses the "fullness" hormone leptin, which makes your brain give you the green light to grab more candy. Glucose is rapidly digested, and your spiked dopamine and blood sugar levels fall quickly. "The crash depends on the person. It can be 15 minutes to a couple of hours after eating," says Bontempo. "Your instinct is to eat more sugar to get another jolt of energy, but it's really important to resist. Once your willpower bank is tapped, it becomes increasingly challenging to make healthy choices." These foods have way more sugar than you realized. Step 2: Have a spoonful of peanut butter AnthonyRosenberg/iStock After a sugar binge, you may want to swear off all calories. However, eating food with other nutrients helps ward off that undesirable sugar crash caused by quick digestion. "A spoonful of peanut butter or handful of nuts gives you fat and protein to slow digestion," says Jennifer Powell Weddig, PhD, RDN, a professor of nutrition at Metropolitan State University of Denver. "Or try hummus with vegetables, which have fiber that helps slow the absorption of simple sugars." Start adopting these habits to kick your sugar cravings for good. Step 3: Take the stairs izf/iStock Resist the temptation to nap. "Get moving," says Bontempo. "Th Continue reading >>

What Is The Healthiest Way To Eat Sweet Foods?

What Is The Healthiest Way To Eat Sweet Foods?

The healthiest way to eat a dessert (or any type of added sugar) is to not eat it. That being said, what is life if you dont live it? For me, a life without the occasional glazed doughnut for breakfast or Sour Patch Kids at the movies is a life not fully lived. Most Americans, including doctors and nutritionists, would likely agree. Nevertheless, studies show that sugar, in excess, can contribute to the development of diabetes, obesity, and heart disease. So when you inevitably consume foods loaded with sugar, is there a way to do so that minimizes the impact on your health? First of all, theres no reason to cut sugar completely out of your diet. Thats a pretty hard thing to do, says Leslie Bonci, a registered dietician and sports nutritionist. She says its unlikely that most people will stick to a sugar-free diet. Everyone, to a certain extent, has a desire for sweet-tasting foodsand for good reason. Sugar provides us with needed energy. So, if we eat a diet completely devoid of sugar, psychologically, that can be devastating. Its much more productive to think about how to keep your sugar intake as healthy as possible. Sugar often gets a bad rap because we eat it alone, in the form of soda and candy, or with other carbohydrates in various baked goods. Since these foods are loaded with simple carbohydrates, they spike our bodies blood glucose levels. When this happens, we immediately try to bring those spikes back down to normal levels by increasing the production of glucose-lowering hormones such as insulin and incretin. If we increase them too much too often, this mechanism stops working as it should, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. But there are ways to try to prevent this. People can start, Bonci says, by simply eating less sugar, or eating it with other foods t Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating With Diabetes: Desserts And Sweets

Eating with Diabetes: Desserts and Sweets By Amy Poetker, Registered Dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator 11/22/2010 Id be willing to bet that most everyone has been toldand therefore believesthat people with diabetes cannot have any sugar and are resigned to living without dessert for the rest of their lives. Well, as a Certified Diabetes Educator, I'm here to tell you that this is a myth. People with diabetes can eat sugar, desserts, and almost any food that contains caloric sweeteners (molasses, honey, maple syrup, and more). Why? Because people with diabetes can eat foods that contain carbohydrates, whether those carbohydrates come from starchy foods like potatoes or sugary foods such as candy. Its best to save sweets and desserts for special occasions so you dont miss out on the more nutritious foods your body needs. However, when you do decide to include a sweet treat, make sure you keep portions small and use your carbohydrate counting plan . The idea that people with diabetes should avoid sugar is decades old. Logically, it makes sense. Diabetes is a condition that causes high blood sugar. Sugary foods cause blood sugar levels to increase. Therefore people with diabetes should avoid sugary foods in order to prevent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and keep their diabetes under control. However, simply avoiding sugary foods does not go very far in terms of controlling blood sugar. Here's why. After you eat, your blood sugar level (aka postprandial blood glucose level) is largely determined by the total amount of carbohydrate you ate, not the source of the carbohydrates eaten. There are two types of carbohydrates that elevate your blood sugar levels: sugar and starch. Both will elevate your blood glucose to roughly the same level (assuming you ate the same a Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What's True And False?

Diabetes: What's True And False?

en espaolLa diabetes: Qu es cierto y qu es falso? If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? No. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system . It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining too much weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only cause of weight gain. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy them sometimes. People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is not Continue reading >>

16 Answers - I Eat A Lot Of Sweets. Will I Get Diabetes If I Don't Stop Eating Them? - Quora

16 Answers - I Eat A Lot Of Sweets. Will I Get Diabetes If I Don't Stop Eating Them? - Quora

I eat a lot of sweets. Will I get diabetes if I don't stop eating them? Learn how your genes play a role in your well-being and lifestyle choices. No way to tell for sure. There's no direct link between sweets consumption and diabetes. But excessive sweets consumption is likely to lead to obesity for you, and that significantly increases your risk for a whole host of health problems later in life -- not just diabetes, but also cardiovascular diseases (heart attacks, etc.) and joint problems. YOURSELFBefore you freak and throw out everything in your kitchen, take a moment to fully understand the official sugar recommendation and the difference between added sugar and naturally-occurring sugar. Fruits, veggies and plain dairy products have naturally occurring sugar that you shouldn't overly concern you. Because fruits and veggies contain other nutrients like fiber and healthy fats, the liver doesn't process the sugar in the same way it would a cookie or a Twix bar. In other words, the sugar in apples and peppers won't contribute to weight gain and diabetes like a soda will.Unfortunately, our labeling laws haven't quite caught up to our dietary guidelines and food products do not yet have a column dedicated to added sugars. Instead, the naturally occurring sugars and the added stuff is all clumped together under "sugar." This is particularly confusing when you're buying things like flavored yogurt, which contain both types of the sweet stuff. So when in doubt, read the ingredients list. If you see words like sugar, honey, agave, or even organic cane juice, know that there's added sugar in your food. To find out how much, look at a similar, unflavored version of the product you're interested in buying and see how they differ. For example, if a serving of plain oatmeal has Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dessert

Diabetes And Dessert

Eating desserts with diabetes A popular misconception about diabetes is that it is caused by eating too many sugary foods. While sweets can and do affect your blood sugar, they do not cause you to develop diabetes. However, when you have diabetes, you must carefully monitor your carbohydrate intake. This is because carbohydrates are responsible for raising your blood sugar levels. While you can enjoy sugary foods when you have diabetes, it is important to do so in moderation and with some understanding of how it could impact your blood sugar. This includes sugars found in desserts. 10 Diabetes Diet Myths » When you have diabetes, your body is either not able to use insulin correctly or not able to make any or enough insulin. Some people with diabetes experience both of these issues. Problems with insulin can cause sugar to build up in your blood since insulin is responsible for helping sugar move from the blood and into the body’s cells. Foods that contain carbohydrates raise blood sugar. Carbohydrates need to be regulated when you have diabetes to help you manage your blood sugar. On nutrition labels, the term “carbohydrates” includes sugars, complex carbohydrates, and fiber. In desserts, a number of sweet-tasting ingredients can be added to enhance sweetness. While some foods, such as fruits, naturally contain sugars, most desserts have some type of sugar added to them. Many dessert labels will not list “sugar” as a key ingredient. Instead, they will list the ingredient as one or more of the following: dextrose fructose high-fructose corn syrup lactose malt syrup sucrose white granulated sugar honey agave nectar glucose maltodextrin These sugar sources are carbohydrates and will raise your blood sugar. They can be found in cookies, cakes, pies, puddings, ca Continue reading >>

The Truth About Sweets And Diabetes

The Truth About Sweets And Diabetes

1. Sweets like candy and cake are off-limits if you have diabetes. FALSE Sweet treats -- like candies, pies, cakes -- were once off-limits for people with diabetes. Not anymore. In fact, research has shown that starches like potatoes and white bread affect blood glucose levels much like sugar -- causing sometimes dangerous spikes in blood sugar. Carbohydrates found in most vegetables or whole grains don't affect blood sugar as much. Counting carbs and choosing the healthiest of them is more important than eliminating sugar altogether. A little sweet treat is OK. If you're at a wedding, for instance, you can have a small slice of cake -- very small. Just substitute it for another starchy carb you might eat, like a small potato or a piece of bread. If you really have a sweet tooth, choose desserts, candy, and sodas made with sugar substitutes. Many artificial sweeteners have no carbs or calories, so you don't need to count them in your meal plan. Others have carbohydrates that are absorbed into the blood more slowly than table sugar, so they don't pose a threat to your blood sugar levels. But once you come off sugar and sweeteners for a few weeks, your body and taste buds will adapt, and you won’t need or crave as much sweetness. Fruits and other natural foods will taste sweeter and more satisfying. 2. A glass of wine with dinner is fine for people with diabetes. TRUE ADVERTISINGinRead invented by Teads Within limits, alcohol is OK. But there are exceptions. You shouldn't drink if your blood sugar levels aren't under control or if you have nerve damage from diabetes. If you do drink, keep portions modest: up to one drink a day for women, or up to two drinks a day for men. Remember, one serving is: Five ounces of wine, or 12 ounces of beer, or 1.5 ounces of hard liquor 3 Continue reading >>

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