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Can You Get Diabetes From Not Eating?

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

7 Surprising Habits That Can Lead To Diabetes

You're cutting back on coffee iStock/Wavebreakmedia Your java habit might not be such a bad thing. Studies show that coffee consumption (both caffeinated and decaffeinated) can reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. One study analysis by the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health found that those who sipped six cups a day had a 33 percent lower risk of developing the disease compared to non-coffee drinkers. Certain components in coffee seem to reduce insulin resistance and may also boost glucose metabolism, the process of converting glucose to energy. Follow these healthy habits to prevent diabetes. You're a chronic night owl iStock/Marilyn Nieves If late night is your favorite time of day, you might be putting yourself at risk for diabetes. A recent Korean study found that people who stay up until the wee hours of the morning are more likely to develop diabetes than those who hit the sack earlier, even if they still get seven to eight hours of sleep, MensHealth.com reported. Night owls tend to be exposed to higher levels of artificial light from televisions and cell phones, a habit that is linked to lower insulin sensitivity and poorer blood sugar regulation, study author Nan Hee Kim, MD, said in a press release. Staying up late is also linked with poor sleep quality and sleep loss, which can disrupt your metabolism. Ignore these diabetes myths that could be sabotaging your health. Your diet is light on probiotics iStock/SilviaJansen "The risk of diabetes increases when you have more bad bugs [bacteria] than good bugs in your gut," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Your stomach needs good bacteria, called probiotics, for proper digestion; low levels can lead to inflammation that may eventually lead to insulin resistance. Eat f Continue reading >>

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Missing Meals? Avoid Dangerous Blood Sugar If You Have Diabetes

Skipping a meal is typically no big deal. But if you have  diabetes , missing meals can throw off the important balancing act between food intake and medication. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy The result is blood sugars that are too low (hypoglycemia) or too high (hyperglycemia) — and that’s dangerous. “If you take medications for diabetes that can cause low blood sugars, you should try not to skip meals,” says registered dietician Dawn Noe. “If you’re just not up to eating on a regular schedule, talk to your doctor about diabetes medications that won’t cause low blood sugars,” she says.  When you’re ill or just don’t feel like eating much, it’s important to monitor your blood sugar levels more closely than ever. How often depends on whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and what medications you take. For type 1 diabetes: Be sure to monitor your blood sugar before meals and before bedtime, typically four times per day, says diabetes specialist Bartolome Burguera, MD . Beyond that, check your blood sugars if you notice symptoms of low blood sugar. Those symptoms include: For type 2 diabetes: If you are taking a sulfonylurea medication, check your blood sugars at least twice a day — in the morning and at bedtime. “It’s important to keep in mind that sulfonylureas may cause blood sugar to drop during the day if you don’t eat anything after taking your medication,” Dr. Burguera says. If your only treatment is metformin, you may not need to check your blood sugar more than once a day. This medication doesn’t typically cause hypoglycemia. It is important to be aware of the symptoms Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Not Eating?

Can You Get Diabetes From Not Eating?

My mom told me you could.. So im just wondering. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: That depends on what you mean by not eating. Missing a meal once in a whille will not cause diabetes, or any other problem. It might actually be beneficial, depending on what research study you read. Fasting, especially for prolonged periods of time, can interfere with the normal operation of many body functions, including insulin/glycogen in order to keep glucose available for the brain to use. Studies do show that the longer the fast, the more problems it generates. Whether or not it leads to insulin resistance is still debatable. Restrictive caloric eating patterns such as anorexia nervosa are more similar to severe malnutrition and starvation than to fasting. Starvation can cause diabetes. Once glucose is used up, the brain and body have to survive off the metabolism of fats and body protiens (which produce keyones as a fuel source). This process damages the internal organs and can lead to many disease processes like diabetes. Many POWs who suffered from severe malnutrition and/or starvation developed diabetes as a direct result (including one of my uncles). Sadly, many POWs suffered from refeeding syndrome when they were rescued, and died as a result (because they can not handle the sudden reintroduction of large amount of carbohydrates). The reintroduction of food in cases of severe malnutrition or starvation is now done differently. Undiagnosed diabetics are at first hungry, but the body is still starving. They may crave sweets, if those are available to them. They do eventually loose their hunger (an effect of starvation itself, not diabetes) and may stop eating. By this time weight loss has become apparent. Before diabetes was well understood, in areas of Continue reading >>

Not Having Enough Food Causes Obesity And Diabetes

Not Having Enough Food Causes Obesity And Diabetes

Not Having Enough Food Causes Obesity and Diabetes Not Having Enough Food Causes Obesity and Diabetes NOT HAVING ENOUGH TO EAT MAY CAUSE OBESITY, diabetes, high blood pressure, and heart disease. Most of us think the chronic disease epidemic is fueled by abundance, but it may be fueled as much by food scarcity and insecurity as it is by excess. And, right now, America is suffering from the highest levels of poverty and food insecurity that it has seen in more than a decade. In 2008 49 million Americansincluding 16.7 million childrenlived in a home at risk of not having enough food on the table every day. After working in Haiti , the poorest country in the Western hemisphere, I learned that one in two Haitians wake up every day not knowing where their next meal will come from. But right here in the wealthiest nation in the world, one in five children live in poverty, one in four children live on food stamps, and one in 10 people dont know where their next meal will come from. The Census Bureau recently reported that the nations poverty rate increased to 14.3 percent in 2009the highest level weve seen since 1994. 43.6 million Americans lived below the poverty line in 2009, earning less than $21,954 per year for a family of four or $10,956 for an individual. We now have the highest number of people living on the threshold of poverty in the history of government record keeping. The poorest areas of the country are also the sickest and have the highest rates of obesity, diabetes , and premature death. These people are dying younger, and life expectancy is plummeting in the poorest states. These states also happen to be the fattest. For example, Mississippithe poorest state in the unionhas poverty rates over 20 percent, obesity rates over 33 percent, and extremely high child Continue reading >>

Worst Foods For Diabetes: 50 Foods To Avoid | Eat This, Not That!

Worst Foods For Diabetes: 50 Foods To Avoid | Eat This, Not That!

Sure, it seems healthy, but a pulverized, low-fiber smoothie made primarily of fruit isnt the best bet for those with diabetes. Smoothies can be large whacks of carbs and sugar, especially if theres no protein or healthy fat that acts similarly to fiber to slow digestion and prevent blood sugar from spiking, according to Isabel Smith, MS, RD, CDN. You can have bread, but just not the white kind, says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE. White sandwich bread is a refined grain, not a whole grain. When eaten as is, it has a high glycemic index and can directly lead to elevated blood-sugar levels. Swap white bread for whole grain or Ezekiel bread. They may be tasty come summer, but char-grilled, burnt meats are high in advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which perpetuate damaged cell receptors and causes insulin resistance, cautions Miriam Jacobson, MS, RD, CNS, CDN. A little bit of char is inevitable when youre grilling, but if any parts are extremely blackened, cut them off before digging in, the American Diabetes Association advises. Made with tenderized cube steak and white flour, this pan-fried Southern dish is one youre better off skipping, Newgent warns. The combination of a high-fat meat coupled with a starchy breading makes this a double-whammy of bad news for folks with diabetes, especially as it relates to their heart health. Its not that you cant eat potatoes, you just have to be cognizant of how theyre prepared and how much you consume. French fries, for example, are a no-go. Fried foods are high in simple carbs and fat, which is a tough combination for diabetics. It will raise blood sugar quickly and keep it high for a long time because the fat takes a while to digest, Zanini explains. According to the American Diabetes Association, people with diabetes are at high ris Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Olivia Yang was stunned when she learned she had type 2 diabetes six years ago, when she was 19. Her doctor was shocked, too. In fact, her physician tested her twice to be sure there wasn’t some mistake. Yang was young, had a normal weight for her 5-foot-2-inch frame, and didn’t consider herself a particularly bad eater. She certainly didn’t seem like someone at risk. Now a new study may hint at why some patients end up with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes even when they don’t appear to have all of the typical risk factors such as age, obesity, and an unhealthy diet. Yang learned of her condition sophomore year of college. She’d gone for a physical — a requirement in order to begin working out with a fitness trainer — but her A1C blood test came back abnormally high, indicating diabetes. An A1C test tells a person’s average blood sugar level over the past few months. More specifically, an A1C test measures what percentage of your hemoglobin — a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen — is coated with sugar. It’s used to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes and to keep tabs on how a person is managing their condition over time. Normal readings land below 5.7 percent. The range for someone with prediabetes falls between 5.7 and 6.4 percent and indicates a high risk of developing diabetes. Anything higher is considered diabetes. Unexpected diagnosis Yang, now 25 and an account executive at an advertising agency in Boston, told CBS News, “It was a shock for me. Type 2 runs in my family. But it happened when my parents were older so it was kind of a shock that I would get it at such a young age.” After the diagnosis, though, she realized she’d had symptoms for a while. “Looking back, I fell asleep a lot. I was tired a lot after I ate, a sym Continue reading >>

How Long Can A Diabetic Go Without Food?

How Long Can A Diabetic Go Without Food?

A diabetic cannot go without food for long. If a diabetic doesn't eat regularly, her blood glucose level can plummet. Diabetics should eat snacks and meals on a schedule because a delay of as little as half an hour can lower blood sugar, which can have catastrophic results. Diabetics are especially prone to a condition known as hypoglycemia, a reaction caused by too much insulin in the bloodstream. Once a diabetic takes insulin, it is important to eat something within 30 minutes before blood sugar begins dropping. The dose of insulin you take must also match the amount of carbohydrates you consume in order to keep blood sugar levels under control. When a diabetic does not eat enough food, but still administers insulin, blood glucose levels can drop dangerously low, inducing hypoglycemia. Early signs of hypoglycemia include dizziness, weakness, headache, hunger or shakiness. If blood glucose drops too low, a person can become confused or even lose consciousness. In some cases, insulin shock can lead to coma. Although all diabetics suffer hypoglycemia at times, according to the American Diabetes Association, you should talk to your doctor about what your blood glucose levels should be. If your blood sugar falls below what your doctor recommends, you are likely hypoglycemic. When hypoglycemia occurs, you need to get some sugar into your body quickly. Fruit juice, milk, a few pieces of hard candy, or a tablespoon of sugar or honey can help raise glucose levels in the blood temporarily. Diabetics often need to adjust the doses of insulin they take depending on how many grams of carbohydrates they eat for a meal or snack. While this balance can be different for one person than for another, counting the carbohydrates you consume allows you to maintain a healthful blood glucose Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

The Dangers Of Skipping Meals When You Have Diabetes

It's tempting -- and even sounds logical -- to skip meals: You're busy, you're not hungry, you're trying to lose weight, or your blood sugar is too high. Skipping meals, however, may actually increase your blood sugar and cause you to gain weight. Here are seven rewards of eating regularly scheduled meals when you live with diabetes. Reward 1: Improve fasting blood glucose numbers. During sleep, when you're not eating, the liver sends more glucose into the blood to fuel the body. For many people during the early years of having type 2 diabetes, the liver doesn't realize there is already more than enough glucose present. "Your morning (fasting) blood sugars have much more to do with your liver and hormonal functions than what you ate for dinner last night," says Kathaleen Briggs Early, Ph.D., RD, CDE, assistant professor of biochemistry and nutrition at Pacific Northwest University of Health Sciences in Yakima, Washington Get more information about why your morning blood sugar is high and tips to help control fasting blood sugar. Real-life example: Until recently, if Cheryl Simpson's blood glucose meter flashed a high reading before breakfast, she might delay eating until midafternoon in an attempt to lower that number. Now Cheryl, PWD type 2, won't leave home without eating breakfast. Her blood glucose numbers have improved. "Plus, eating breakfast makes it a whole lot easier to make good food choices later on," she says. Tip: Pack a grab-and-go breakfast with these 13 quick-fix ideas! Reward 2: Stay off the blood sugar roller coaster. Irregular eating can have you "bouncing back and forth between normal blood sugars and high blood sugars," Early says. A meager meal can give you a meager rise in blood sugar. If you take one or more blood glucose-lowering medications tha Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Consider this your diabetes diet cheat sheet! Consider this your diabetes diet cheat sheet! Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesnt mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eatyou may just not know what they are yet. But thats okay, because were here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once youve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, its important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products cant claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect, explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook. , adding,* I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal. For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly . Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins werent the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didnt realize just how awful certain pastries can be. Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entir Continue reading >>

Starvation Can Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Starvation Can Cure Type 2 Diabetes

A new study shows that starvation (eating 600 kcal/day) can cure type 2-diabetes, just like gastric bypass surgery. Again, there is no need to explain the effect of the surgery with other speculative theories. The resulting starvation reverses diabetes. And the starvation isn’t even necessary to do that. Guardian: Low-calorie diet offers hope of cure for type 2 diabetes Unnecessary starvation If a type 2 diabetic stops eating (carbs) the symptoms of diabetes starts to go away. But starvation or surgery are unnecessarily painful ways to do it. Luckily diabetics can eat real food to satiety, as long as they avoid sugar and starch. The food that quickly turns into simple sugars in the gut. Cutting away their stomach or starving themselves is not necessary. All they need is good food. More Across the river for water: Surgery for diabetes PS A Gastric Bypass operation protects from eating too much carbohydrates in two ways. Number one: you can only eat miniature portions of anything. Number two: the smaller amounts of starch you eat is not digestedd as easily as the duodenum with the starch-digesting enzyme amylase is diverted from direct contact with the food. Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

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