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Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

What Happens If a Diabetic Eats Too Much Sugar In pre-diabetes, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, the cells become resistant to the action of insulin, and your pancreas is unable to make enough insulin to overcome this resistance. Instead of moving into your cells where it's needed for energy, sugar builds up in your bloodstream. and causes the following common symptoms How do you know if you have diabetes? Constant hunger and fatigue and the need for sugary snacks and drinks as a pick up is a warning sign. Your body converts the food you eat into glucose that your cells use for energy, Peeing more often and being thirstier. The average person usually has to pee between four and seven times in 24 hours, but people with diabetes may go a lot more, Dry mouth and itchy skin, Blurred vision Diabetes is the condition in which the body does not properly process refined carbohydrates, especially fructose for use as energy. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. What causes lack of insulin in the body? This may result from type 1 diabetes when someone is born with the condition. It also occurs when insulin-producing cells are damaged or destroyed and stop producing insulin. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar into cells throughout the body. The resulting insulin deficiency leaves too much sugar in the blood and not enough in the cells for energy Can you get diabetes from eating too much sugar in one day? Short answer is NO Sugar doesn't cause diabetes to occur in one day. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary fo Continue reading >>

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Sugar Cause Diabetes?

5 Ways to Beat Bad Breath Why Orgasms Feel Good WebMD Expert Answers: Is sugar the enemy? Where does/can it fit in the diet of someone with diabetes? Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes? Myths And Facts

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes? Myths And Facts

We have often heard that if you eat too much sugar, you are prone to getting diabetes. Since childhood, your parents and grandparents always warn you against eating too much sugar for the fear that you might get the condition. However, there are several myths surrounding diabetes and the conclusion that eating too much sugar cause diabetes is one such myth. However, it is true that you should not eat too much sugar for several reasons. In this article, we shall analyze and discuss the myths and facts surrounding the relationship between diabetes and sugar. So, come and join in for the article “Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes? Myths and Facts.” Myths The following are some of the myths regarding the relationship between diabetes and sugar that are falsely believed as true: – Well, one of the myths about diabetes is that eating too much sugar leads to diabetes. However, this is not true. Type 1 diabetes, as we know, is a condition which takes place in your body when the beta cells of the pancreas are damaged. The damage takes place because of the loss of effective immunity in the body. This is not directly related to how much sugar you are eating or taking in on a daily basis. – While type 1 diabetes is mainly caused due to genetic and other environmental factors, type 2 is mostly contracted as a result of obesity and that way your lifestyle is. – As against the popular belief, you can eat cakes and other things that have sugar in it. However, while doing so, remember to not go overboard and eat within the recommended quantity. – It is also a myth, that if you are someone who has diabetes already, you should not and cannot eat chocolate or foods that are sweet. However, if you consult your doctor and make them a part of your daily diet while also bein Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Q: Does eating too much sugar cause diabetes? This is a question I hear often from my patients. Sugar itself is not the culprit when it comes to diabetes. However, eating too much sugar can lead to obesity, which is a major risk factor for developing Type 2 diabetes and other diseases. Eating a healthy diet (which means limiting your refined sugar intake) and maintaining an active lifestyle are key to preventing Type 2 diabetes, especially if you have a family history of the disease. Here are some other common questions I hear from my patients. Q: What’s the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is a genetic disease that is not preventable. Symptoms typically begin in childhood or young adulthood. With Type 1, the body’s immune system destroys the cells that release insulin, eventually eliminating insulin production from the body. Without insulin, cells cannot absorb sugar (glucose), which they need to produce energy. Type 2 diabetes typically occurs in adulthood, though more children are being diagnosed every year. The body has too little insulin or cannot use insulin effectively. Type 2 can be prevented or delayed with a healthy lifestyle, including maintaining a healthy weight, eating sensibly, and exercising regularly. Q: I was just told I have prediabetes. Do I have anything to worry about? Having prediabetes puts you at very high risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. The good news is that you can do something about it. Research suggests that you can cut your risk for developing Type 2 diabetes by 58 percent if you lose 7 percent of your body weight and exercise moderately for 30 minutes a day, five days a week. Q: Are people with diabetes more likely to get a cold or the flu? Having diabetes does not make you more vulnerable to getting a Continue reading >>

8 Signs You're Eating Too Much Sugar

8 Signs You're Eating Too Much Sugar

Sugar is delicious. Anyone who denies that is lying. But because life is unfair, sugar, especially in copious amounts, is really bad for your health. In fact, once you learn about all the ways sugar impacts your body, it’s difficult to look at it the same way (despite knowing how heavenly it tastes). So how do you know if you’re eating too much? Here are eight red flags your body is sending you that it’s time to cut back on the sweet stuff. 1. You constantly crave sugary things. The more sugar you eat, the more you’ll crave it. “More cravings then equal consuming more sugar—it becomes a vicious and addictive cycle,” Brooke Alpert, M.S., R.D., author of “The Sugar Detox: Lose Weight, Feel Great and Look Years Younger,” told SELF. This isn’t just because your taste buds have adapted and left you needing more and more to get that same taste, but also because of how sugar gives you a high followed by a crash, just like an actual drug. “By eating a high sugar diet, you cause a hormonal response in your body that’s like a wave, it brings you up and then you crash down and it triggers your body to want more sugar.” 2. You feel sluggish throughout the day. What goes up must come down. After sugar causes an initial spike of insulin and that “high” feeling, it causes an inevitable crash. “Energy is most stable when blood sugar is stable, so when you’re consuming too much sugar, the highs and lows of your blood sugar lead to highs and lows of energy,” Alpert said. Eating a lot of sugar also means it’s likely you’re not eating enough protein and fiber, both important nutrients for sustained energy. 3. Your skin won’t stop breaking out. “Some people are sensitive to getting a spike in insulin from sugar intake, which can set off a hormonal Continue reading >>

8 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

8 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

Sugar is delicious. Anyone who denies that is lying. But because life is unfair, sugar, especially in copious amounts, is really bad for your health. In fact, once you learn about all the ways sugar impacts your body, it's difficult to look at it the same way (despite knowing how heavenly it tastes). So how do you know if you're eating too much? Here are eight red flags your body is sending you that it's time to cut back on the sweet stuff. 1. You constantly crave sugary things. The more sugar you eat, the more you'll crave it. "More cravings then equal consuming more sugar—it becomes a vicious and addictive cycle," Brooke Alpert, M.S., R.D., author of The Sugar Detox: Lose Weight, Feel Great and Look Years Younger, tells SELF. This isn't just because your taste buds have adapted and left you needing more and more to get that same taste, but also because of how sugar gives you a high followed by a crash, just like an actual drug. "By eating a high sugar diet, you cause a hormonal response in your body that’s like a wave, it brings you up and then you crash down and it triggers your body to want more sugar." 2. You feel sluggish throughout the day. What goes up must come down. After sugar causes an initial spike of insulin and that "high" feeling, it causes an inevitable crash. "Energy is most stable when blood sugar is stable, so when you’re consuming too much sugar, the highs and lows of your blood sugar lead to highs and lows of energy," Alpert says. Eating a lot of sugar also means it's likely you're not eating enough protein and fiber, both important nutrients for sustained energy. 3. Your skin won't stop breaking out. "Some people are sensitive to getting a spike in insulin from sugar intake, which can set off a hormonal cascade that can lead to a breakout li Continue reading >>

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

Q: Can Eating A Lot Of Sugar Give You Diabetes?

A: Not specifically. But too much of any unhealthy food can make you fat, which can cause diabetes. Our expert: Prof Ian Caterson It's a warning that rings harshly in the ear of anyone with a sweet tooth. You're about to tuck into a bag of your favourite lollies when someone shrieks in horror: "Don't eat those! You'll get diabetes!!" But do high-sugar foods really pose this risk? It's true that diabetes is a disease where there's too much glucose — a type of sugar — in your blood. But just because you have high blood sugar doesn't mean eating a lot of sugar is what got you there, says Ian Caterson, Boden Professor of Human Nutrition at the University of Sydney. In fact, the notion there's a direct link between eating sugar and developing diabetes is a myth, Caterson says. However, eating too many sugary foods can lead to weight gain, a key trigger for the most common form of diabetes: type 2. But so can eating too much of many other unhealthy foods, not just those high in sugar. "It is more being overweight — particularly around the waist — that is linked with type 2 diabetes than any particular food you eat," he says. Body fat and insulin Weight gain can lead to diabetes because extra body fat causes chemical changes in your body. "We used to think fat was just a storage tissue but we now know it's more than that," Caterson says. It's an active tissue which produces hormones — chemical messengers that influence processes in the body, he says. In particular, hormones produced by fat influence the activity of another hormone, insulin, which controls the uptake of glucose from your blood. Glucose is the body's main source of energy and it comes from carbohydrates such as potatoes, bread, pasta and rice, fruit and milk. After food is digested, the glucose is rele Continue reading >>

12 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

12 Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

Most people think only diabetics have high blood sugar levels. Yet this isn’t so. Any person can suffer from this and may not notice the harm being done to nerves, blood vessels, and organs. We at Bright Side are sure that in order to prevent complications, it’s important to recognize worrying symptoms in time and take appropriate measures. High blood sugar prevents glucose from entering cells. As a result, the body doesn’t receive energy and asks for food again and again: it’s a vicious circle. At a high blood sugar level, the body is unable to store and absorb glucose properly. Energy is used inefficiently, and body cells don’t receive the fuel they need. All this leads to the fact that a person often feels tired for no reason. If the blood sugar is too high, the kidneys cannot reabsorb fluid. Therefore, the body, trying to equalize the glucose concentration in the blood and in the cells, dissolves blood with intracellular fluid, thus bringing the concentration of glucose to normal. This results in frequent urination. A dry mouth and strong thirst are responses to severe fluid loss. The hypothalamus, which assesses the level of dehydration and causes thirst, sends a corresponding signal to the brain. Of course, you cannot refuse to drink, but it’s better if you choose water or tea without sugar. With a high glucose level, you can lose weight within a short period of time, even if meals are frequent and contain a lot of calories. There are several reasons for this: Fluid loss due to frequent urination leads to a low fluid level in the whole body, and it results in weight loss. If the insulin level is insufficient for glucose metabolism, the body will switch to fat burning. A large amount of urine at a high level of glucose makes the body spend more calories Continue reading >>

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

“sugar Does Not Cause Diabetes”: Did The Film What The Health Get It Right?

The documentary What the Health is receiving a huge amount of attention and most of it is positive. Many reports of people attempting to eat better are filling social media. I discussed the film on a local TV station in Detroit after two reporters indicated that the movie had made a big impact on their diets. There have even been reports that restaurants serving healthier fare have seen an uptick in customers attributing the change to the film. I have seen this in my own plant-based restaurant and have a What The Health Happy Hour that has been very popular. Naturally, there have been critics of the movie defending their viewpoint that meat based diets are healthy, but most have rallied around a statement in the film by Neal Barnard, MD that “sugar does not cause diabetes”. As the answer to this question may be important to you, I have done some research and share it here but this is in NO way an endorsement to add back soda and candy bars to your diet. In a world stressed by growing obesity and its medical consequences, limiting sugar is a universal recommendation from all health experts. 1) Type 1 diabetes is not caused by sugar. All agree on this as type 1 diabetes is considered an autoimmune disease leading to destruction of the insulin producing cells in the pancreas. However, patients with type 1 diabetes can develop and reverse insulin resistance (IR) in their muscles and liver so understanding the origin of IR is important. 2) Who is Neal Barnard, MD? Dr. Barnard is a graduate of the George Washington University School of Medicine and an adjunct associate professor of medicine there. He has published over 70 scientific publications (including long term studies on diet and diabetes) and 18 books including several New York Times bestsellers on health and diabe Continue reading >>

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

You’ve heard the joke a million times. And with Christmas around the corner, you’re bound to hear it a whole lot more: “With all those sweets, you’re going to give us all diabetes!” It’s funny, but most people do assume there’s at least a hint of truth to it. Is eating sweets today going to give me diabetes tomorrow? We all know diabetes is linked to high levels of blood sugar, so it may seem logical to assume that overdosing on the sweet stuff is why so many people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. But of course, it’s not that simple. Diabetes, By The Numbers Diabetes does not have one cause, per se. It happens when your body is not able to make enough insulin or effectively use the insulin it has. This can happen for a couple of different reasons. In people with type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Without insulin, the body isn’t able to use glucose as fuel, and blood sugars rise to dangerous levels. For people with type 2 diabetes, muscle and other cells stop responding to insulin. Without insulin telling the cells to let glucose in, blood sugars remain high and cells aren’t able to get the fuel they need to function properly. The Things you Can Control Of course, type 1 diabetes is due to factors we can’t control, like our genes and some viruses. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, is due to a mix of things we can and can’t control. While we can’t do anything about our genes, our age or our ethnicity, we can control our weight, our diet and how physically active we are. Now to the sugar: Although excessive sugar intake is not a direct cause of type 2 diabetes, excess calories lead to weight gain, which increases your diabetes risk. And since added sugars are one of the largest sources of Continue reading >>

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Sugar Cause Diabetes?

The recent film What the Health raised the question as to whether sugar or other carbohydrates cause diabetes. The notion is understandable. Blood sugar levels are high in diabetes, so a common idea has held that eating sugar somehow triggers the disease process. However, the major diabetes organizations take a different view. The American Diabetes Association1 and Diabetes UK2 have labelled this notion a “myth,” as has the Joslin Diabetes Center,3 which wrote, “Diabetes is not caused by eating too much sugar.” These and other organizations have worked to educate people about the causes of diabetes and the role that foods play in the disease process. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Type 2 diabetes—the most common form of the disease—is caused by insulin resistance and pancreatic failure. Here is what you need to know: Sugar Is the Body’s Fuel The human body runs on glucose, a simple sugar. Just as gasoline powers your car, glucose powers your muscles, your brain, and the rest of your body. Glucose comes from fruit and from starchy foods, such as grains, beans, and potatoes, and your body can also produce it when needed. Without it you would die. Diabetes means having higher-than-normal blood glucose values. It comes in three common forms: Type 1 diabetes is caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, usually through an autoimmune process. The triggers for this process are under investigation and may include dairy proteins, viruses, or other factors. Type 2 diabetes typically starts with insulin resistance. That is, the cells of the body resist insulin’s efforts to escort glucose into the cells. What causes insulin resistance? It appears to be caused by an accumulation of microscopic fat particles within muscle and Continue reading >>

10 Signs You Are Eating Too Much Sugar

10 Signs You Are Eating Too Much Sugar

Sugar-related illnesses are on the rise. Diabetes, cardio-vascular problems, cancer and even adrenal fatigue are just some of the serious chronic diseases connected to over-indulging in the sweet white poison. Many people realize they are addicted to sugar when throughout the day, they would often find themselves craving something sweet and comforting that would give them a little lift. Have you become a sugar addict? Are you eating too much sugar? Here are warning signs you’re eating too much sugar. 10 Signs you are Eating Too Much Sugar 1. Tiredness & Lack of energy A constant feeling of tiredness or fatigue is one of the biggest signs you’ve got too much sugar in your diet. Although high-sugar foods can give you a big carbohydrate boost and temporarily lend a feeling of increased energy, the crash that comes afterward is a daunting one. Feeling tired all the time may be a sign that it’s time to reexamine your diet to see if you’re eating (or drinking) too much sugar. There could be other reasons you are feeling tired and you can read about them in my article about the 6 reasons you’re tired all the time and how to beat fatigue. 2. Sugar/Carb Cravings If you find yourself craving the sweet flavor of sugary snacks on a daily basis, chances are you’ve become a sugar addict. Sugar consumption can create a chain reaction of sugar cravings because it is so sweetly addictive. If you hear the carbs calling your name with every move you make, you could be in the throes of a deep sugar addiction. 3. Frequent colds & flu If you find yourself falling ill more often than you used to, it could be due to having excessive sugar in your diet. If every virus that goes around seems to find you and make you sick, it could be due to your penchant for sugary treats. Consumptio Continue reading >>

9 Clear Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

9 Clear Signs You’re Eating Too Much Sugar

How much sugar is too much? iStock/Xristov The World Health Organization recently recommended a sharp drop in sugar intake. Just 5 percent of calories should ideally come from added sugars, the WHO advises; down from 10 percent. This translates to about 6 teaspoons of added sugar a day, or about the amount in one 8-ounce bottle of sweetened lemon iced tea. The average American consumes almost quadruple the WHO recommendation—22 teaspoons of added sugar a day. Watch for these signs you might be eating too much sugar, and then figure out tricks to cut back. Slashing sugar can be tricky because sugar is so ubiquitous—you’ll find it even in healthy-sounding foods like cereal and yogurt. Read ingredient lists and reduce your intake of processed, packaged foods in favor of fresh produce and lean protein. You can also try these secrets people on a low-sugar diet swear by. iStock/Tassii Eating too much sugar can wreak havoc on your skin. A study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggests a relationship between a high-sugar diet and the severity of acne. Participants with moderate to severe acne reported a higher sugar intake compared with people who had mild or no acne. Try one of these home remedies to make acne disappear. You feel totally wiped iStock/ridvan If you eat breakfast or lunch packed with sneaky sugar and distinctly lacking in satiating protein, fiber, and fat—say, a jumbo bagel with jelly—you could find yourself stuck in a mean afternoon energy slump. You might develop a pounding headache or an urge to cuddle up in bed. A balanced and nutritious diet prevents your blood sugar from going from a sugary high to a lethargic low. Try these tricks to undo a sugar binge. Your dentist has bad news iStock/shironosov Cavities have always bee Continue reading >>

Can You Become Type Ii Diabetic By Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Become Type Ii Diabetic By Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar and diabetes have more associations than not H ow much sugar can you consume if you have diabetes? A common question, but not so easy to be answered. We cannot say that sugar is responsible for causing diabetes. But we can surely say, sugar is more involved with diabetes then many would like to think. There are a lot of myth lists on the Internet saying: “Sugar does not cause diabetes”. But there is also another myth that says “sugar causes diabetes” both are false and true. Confused yet? Its not sugar that cause diabetes but our overproduction of insulin that does. Specially coming from high fructose foods – sugar happens to be the highest fructose food of all (if we can call it food). So, the short answer is no. If you have diabetes you shouldn’t eat any sugar at all. At least until you achieve some control and bring your body to stability. Is like saying cigarettes don’t cause cancer; its the smoke that does. Sugar will surely spike your blood glucose like no other food. It will make your pancreas release too much insulin leading to insulin resistance and a series of other complications. That alone has significance in diabetes. In a way sugar is like adding insult to injury when it comes to diabetes. But all carbohydrates do essentially the same. “The defining feature of diabetes is too much glucose” Table sugar is not the only sugar that you might be exposed to. All carbohydrates and specially refined grains have the same effect as sugar when consumed. Many people, including diabetics are eating huge quantities of carbohydrates without realizing the health implications that could bring in the long run. We don’t need to eat so many carbohydrates. We can eat more fats and proteins. Diabetes is caused by our excess carbohydrate intake. Sugar i Continue reading >>

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Does Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Diabetes?

Diabetes is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar either because of the inability of the body to produce enough insulin or the inability to respond to the insulin so produced. It is classified as follows: Type 1, Type 2 and Gestational Diabetes Mellitus. Glucose is the primary energy source in humans and its levels are majorly regulated by pancreatic insulin. Insulin facilitates the breakdown of glucose and its entry into respiring cells and tissues. In Type 1 diabetes, the body fails to produce insulin and requires injected insulin. People suffering from Type 1 diabetes face daily challenges of monitoring glucose levels, controlling eating habits, exercising and insulin administration. In Type 2 diabetes, cells fail to use insulin properly (insulin resistance) which may be combined with an absolute insulin deficiency. Type 1 is observed more frequently in children and adolescents while Type 2, which account for more than 90% of the diabetes cases worldwide, is commonly detected in adults. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus currently occurs in 5% of the pregnancies and its prevalence is expected to rise along with the incidence of worldwide obesity. Pregnancies suffering from Gestational Diabetes Mellitus are at a greater risk of other complications like pre-eclampsia, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular disorders, Type 2 diabetes and gestational hypertension. Offspring of these women are also predisposed to conditions like obesity, Type 2 diabetes and the metabolic syndrome. Other forms of diabetes include congenital diabetes caused due to genetic defects of insulin secretion, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, steroid diabetes induced by high doses of glucocorticoids etc. (How to Prevent Diabetes Induced Foot Injuries) Some of the important features Continue reading >>

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