diabetestalk.net

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Salt

Too Much Salt Could Increase Diabetes Risk

Too Much Salt Could Increase Diabetes Risk

Too much salt could increase diabetes risk The threat on your plate: salt may significantly increase the risk of developing different forms of diabetes. Researchers suggest that sodium - which we commonly ingest through salt, or sodium chloride - could increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and latent autoimmune diabetes in adults. Diabetes is a common condition that affects more than 29 million people in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Type 2 diabetes accounts for up to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases and is characterized by abnormal levels of blood sugar. This type of diabetes is most often diagnosed in middle-aged and senior people. Another metabolic condition called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is often misdiagnosed as type 2 diabetes; it also appears later in adulthood. LADA is a more slowly progressing disease, and it does not initially require insulin treatment. A new study conducted by Dr. Bahareh Rasouli, of the Institute of Environmental Medicine at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden - in collaboration with researchers from other Swedish and Finnish institutions - now looks at the impact of sodium intake on the risk of type 2 diabetes and LADA. The researchers havepresented their findings at the annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes , held in Lisbon, Portugal. Existing research had already suggested that the sodium we usually absorb from our daily intake of salt may significantly increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The team explains that thismay be because sodium impacts insulin resistance , but also because excess salt can lead to hypertension and gaining excess weight. Butuntil now, no studies had looked at the impact of sodium intake Continue reading >>

4 Major Signs Youre Eating Way Too Much Salt

4 Major Signs Youre Eating Way Too Much Salt

4 major signs youre eating way too much salt Onpizza night, mac and cheese or burger night, you knowyoure in for a serious dose of sodium. But beyond those obviously salty foods ,sodium has a way of sneaking on to your plate more often than you mightrealise. Itseverywhere starting with the fancy salt you pick upat theorganic weekend market. All salt contains 40% sodium, saysMandy Enright, anutritionist and fitness trainer in New Jersey. That means Kosher, pinkHimalayan and even that fancy French sea salt are all just as bad as the stuffthat comes in packets at fast-food restaurants. Beyond the salt you know youre adding, tonsofsodiumis still sneaking its way onto your plate. The general rule of thumb is that any processed or man-madefood most likely contains sodium and high levels of it, says Enright. If itcomes in a can or is pre-made and frozen, theres salt present. And although there remains debate over the more scarypotentialside effects of excesssodium (like its connection withblood pressure), too much of it can, at the very least, cause bloating andwater retention. According to the most recent dietary guidelines, capping yoursalt intake at 2 300mg of sodium (one teaspoon) per day is recommended, butmost of us are soaring past their salty limit. The average daily consumption is closer to 3 400mg of sodium perday (about one and one third teaspoons), she says. Next time youre grabbinggroceries, look at the nutrition label and peep at the sodium percentage. Anything with 5% or less per serving is considered a low-sodiumsource, while 20% or more is considered a high-sodium source, Enright says. Here are four signs you might be getting too much of theseasoning: Sodium plays a starring role in helping our bodies balancefluid. We need some salt intake each day to help ma Continue reading >>

Is Salt Bad For Diabetics? | Everyday Health

Is Salt Bad For Diabetics? | Everyday Health

Diabetes and Salt: How Much Is Safe and How to Limit It in Your Diet You need the mineral in your diabetes diet, but too much can be dangerous. Heres how to know when youve hit your sodium limit, and how to sleuth out all the sneaky places it hides. Salt may be hiding in everything from your bread to your cheese, and too much of the ingredient can harm your heart, a particular concern when you have diabetes. Ina Peters/Stocksy; Kristin Duvall/Getty Images; Thinkstock When you were diagnosed with diabetes, one of your first concerns was probably how you were going to monitor your carbohydrate intake. So you thought about potatoes, bread, pasta, and even fruit. But theres actually another nutrient that everyone with type 2 diabetes should have on their radar: sodium. Its true that our bodies need sodium, as its a necessary electrolyte , a mineral that regulates your bodys fluid balance, and helps ensure proper muscle and nerve function. Problem is, 89 percent of adults get too much, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) . When your body cant shed the excess sodium, it can cause high blood pressure, a risk factor for heart disease. Diabetes and Heart Disease: What to Know About Your Risk The statistics linking diabetes and heart disease are enough to get you to put down the soy sauce for good. According to the American Heart Association (AHA) , adults with diabetes are up to 4 times more likely to die from heart disease compared with those who don't havediabetes. That could be because people with type 2 diabetes may have certain risk factors that make them more prone to cardiovascular disease, like having high blood pressure, having highLDL, or bad, cholesterol, carrying excess weight, and living a more sedentary lifestyle. Research b Continue reading >>

Is A Low Sodium Diet Or Low Sugar Diet Healthier? | Shape Magazine

Is A Low Sodium Diet Or Low Sugar Diet Healthier? | Shape Magazine

Q: Is it worse to consume too much salt or too much sugar? A: In excess, both are very bad for your heart and health. However, consuming too much sugar is worse because it can make the negative effects of sodium even more harmful. [ Tweet this fact !] The main concern about excess sodium is that elevated blood pressure (hypertension) is known as the "silent killer" and is responsible for more than 350,000 deaths a year. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Americans' intake of sodium comes from four main sources:75 percent is in pre-packaged, processed, and restaurant food;12 percent occurs naturally in food;6 percent is added at the table; and5 percent is added during home cooking. Although the place most people looking to restrict salt typically start is home cooking, that's not going to make much of an impact since it's such a small percentage of our daily sodium. Plus my experience with clients has shown that monitoring the intakes of individual foods (i.e. "calorie counting" for sodium) is usually not an effective strategy. The best way to reduce salt is to limit your intake of high-sodium processed and pre-packaged foods, which is also an effective strategy to lose or maintain weight and eat a diet healthier overall. RELATED: Salt Shockers: 5 Foods as Sodium-Packed as Soy Sauce While sodium intake has a direct consequence on your blood pressure, sugar's detrimental effects on the body are not as singularly focused. We often hear about the short-term (weight gain) and long-term(diabetes)consequences of too much sugar, but there are many negative effects between these two extremes. Aside from being a major source of calories that in excess can lead to fat gain, too much sugar can cause accelerated cellular aging and excessive inflammation, b Continue reading >>

Too Much Salt Leads To Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, And Other Autoimmune Diseases, Studies Say - Men's Journal

Too Much Salt Leads To Diabetes, Multiple Sclerosis, And Other Autoimmune Diseases, Studies Say - Men's Journal

Salt-Heavy Diets Can Lead to Autoimmune Diseases Two new studies add to a growing pile of evidence that a salt-heavy diet can spur the development or worsening of autoimmune diseases. These ailments, which include multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and psoriasis, result from an immune system gone haywire that attacks the body instead of germs. Medical investigators have long searched for environmental triggers to explain the spike in many such diseases over the last half-century in Western countries. The too-much-salt hypothesis is an attractive one, given the simultaneous rise in the popularity of processed and other fast foods which, as we all know, often come loaded with sodium. The evidence is fast becoming clear that there is some connection between salt and these disorders. The studies, both published in Nature , looked at how cultured cells behaved when exposed to salt concentrations mimicking a salty diet. They made an excessive amount of a cell type called a helper T cell, one that cranks out the inflammatory protein interleukin-17 (Il-17). These so-called Th17 cells are known to be major drivers of autoimmune disease. In examining mice fed a salty diet, the researchers saw that the rodents likewise produced more Th17. A subset of these mice genetically altered to be prone to an autoimmune disorder similar to human multiple sclerosis also developed a more severe form of the disease. There is plenty of pushback to the studies. These initial findings are controversial because of their wide-ranging implications for fast food establishments and public health and should open up a flurry of follow-up investigations that assess salt-rich diets and autoimmune disease rates. Until then, its best to watch your salt intake. We know that its Continue reading >>

Why Too Much Salt Could Be Extra Harmful For Diabetics

Why Too Much Salt Could Be Extra Harmful For Diabetics

A diet loaded with salt is associated with double the risk of heart attack or stroke in people with type 2 diabetes. HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A diet loaded with salt is associated with double the risk of heart attack or stroke in people with type 2 diabetes. The risk skyrockets even higher among those whose diabetes isn't well-managed, a new Japanese study reports. The study found that people with diabetes who consumed an average of 5.9 grams of sodium daily had double the risk of developing heart disease than those who consumed, on average, 2.8 grams of sodium daily. In addition, heart disease risk jumped nearly 10-fold for people with poorly managed type 2 diabetes and a diet with excess salt. However, it's important to note that this study only found an association between salt intake and increased heart disease; the study wasn't designed to prove that the increased salt intake actually caused heart disease. Still, experts believe it's important to limit salt in the diet. "The findings are very important from a public health point of view," said Dr. Prakash Deedwania, chief of cardiology for the Veterans Administration Central California Health Care System and a professor at the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine. "Everyone's focused on controlling glucose [blood sugar] to prevent diabetes complications. Salt intake is not as well emphasized, but this shows it should be reduced as well," said Deedwania, a member of the American College of Cardiology's Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease Committee. The study highlights the need for people with diabetes to track more than just carbohydrates when managing their daily diet, said Deedwania. Public health officials previously have established a link between diab Continue reading >>

How Salt Intake Affects Diabetes

How Salt Intake Affects Diabetes

Aubri John has been a contributing researcher and writer to online physical and mental health oriented journals since 2005. John publishes online health and fitness articles that coincide with her licensed clinical skills in addictions, psychology and medical care. She has a master's degree in clinical social work and a Ph.D. in health psychology. Diabetes, a chronic metabolic disease, affects millions of Americans. People with diabetes have a higher likelihood of developing health complications that impact the heart, nervous system and kidneys. High blood pressure, or hypertension, is twice as common in diabetics as in nondiabetics, which increases the risk of a range of cardiovascular diseases. High salt intake contributes to hypertension, but salt does not have an effect on blood sugar. You get energy from the nutrients in foods containing proteins, fats and carbohydrates, but carbohydrates are the only types of foods that directly affect your blood sugar. Diabetes prevents your body from properly using blood sugar, or glucose, the main source of energy for your cells. Normally, when you eat a carbohydrate, it is metabolized into smaller sugar molecules, or glucose, sent into your bloodstream and met by the hormone insulin, which then transports the glucose into your cells. A diabetic does not produce or use insulin properly, and the glucose gets left in the bloodstream. Salt has no effect on the blood sugar process, but excess salt does have other implications for the health of a diabetic. People with diabetes have an increased risk of high blood pressure, notes the American Diabetes Association, because excess sodium in your diet causes blood pressure to rise. Common table salt contains 40 percent sodium, an essential mineral your body uses in small amounts for ma Continue reading >>

Are You Eating Too Much Salt In Your Diet?

Are You Eating Too Much Salt In Your Diet?

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, most Americans consume too much sodium - the average intake at 3,400 mg for those 2 years and older. Current dietary guidelines recommend consuming less than 2,300 milligrams (mg) of sodium a day or reducing to 1,500 mg for those who are African American, have hypertension, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, and/or are over the age of 51. While these have been the recommendations for years, controversy surrounds the topic of sodium. Some scientists say the current recommendation is too high, others say higher levels are safe. One thing they all agree on is certain populations, like those at risk for cardiovascular disease or who have high blood pressure or diabetes, should avoid excessive amounts. In 2013, the Institute of Medicine, an independent, nonprofit organization that works apart from the government, examined recent research to determine if evidence supported the current recommendations. The expert committee reported research does show that reducing sodium intake (from very high to more moderate levels) did improve health. But they also stated that lowering sodium too much could actually increase a person's risk of some health problems. The 2015 Dietary Guidelines, still in draft form but set to be released later this year, look as if they will keep the 2,300 mg limit but drop the stricter 1,500 mg limit. Many of the studies surrounding sodium vary based on the way they are conducted and are limited in quantity and quality. There is more research that needs to be done when considering sodium's ultimate impact on health. Other variables exist that should be considered when looking at an individual's salt intake. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), some individuals are more salt sensit Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Salt?

Can You Get Diabetes From Salt?

What does sodium have to do with your risk of type 2 diabetes? Its well-known that a poor diet, inactivity, and obesity are all associated with type 2 diabetes . Some people think that the amount of sodium you consume also plays a role. But in reality, eating too much sodium doesnt directly cause diabetes. The relationship between salt and diabetes is more complex. Sodium is responsible for controlling the balance of fluids in your body and helps maintain a normal blood volume and blood pressure. Consuming too much salt can raise blood pressure, resulting in fluid retention. This can cause swelling in the feet and other health issues that are very harmful to people with diabetes. If you have diabetes or prediabetes , the amount of sodium you consume can worsen your condition by causing hypertension (high blood pressure). Those with diabetes or prediabetes are at a greater risk of high blood pressure, which can make a person more susceptible to heart disease, stroke, and kidney disease. While many natural foods contain salt, most Americans consume sodium through table salt, which is added during cooking or processing. The average American consumes 5 or more teaspoons of salt daily, which is about 20 times as much salt than whats needed by the body. The saltiest foods are those that are processed or canned. Foods sold in restaurants or as fast food also tend to be very salty. Here are some common high-sodium foods: meat, fish, or poultry thats been cured, canned, salted, or smoked, including: bacon, cold cuts, ham, frankfurters, sausage, sardines, caviar, and anchovies frozen dinners and breaded meats, including pizza, burritos, and chicken nuggets canned meals, including baked beans, chili, ravioli, soups, and spam canned vegetables, stocks, and broths with salt added c Continue reading >>

Too Much Salt Hurting Majority Of Americans

Too Much Salt Hurting Majority Of Americans

Too Much Salt Hurting Majority of Americans 70% of U.S. Adults Eat 2.3 Times the Healthy Amount March 26, 2009 -- Americans already eat way more than the recommended amount of salt, and now the CDC finds that even lower recommendations apply to 70% of us. New data show that the average U.S. adult consumes one-and-a-half teaspoons of salt every day. That's a half teaspoon more than the basic daily recommendation of one teaspoon (about 2,300 milligrams of sodium). But the recommendation is much lower for people with high blood pressure , people over 40, and all African-American adults. These groups should be eating no more than two-thirds of a teaspoon of salt (about 1,500 milligrams of sodium) per day. More than two out of three Americans -- some 145.5 million of us -- are in those categories, the CDC now calculates. Seven out of 10 U.S. adults get 2.3 times the healthy amount of salt. It's putting us in a world of hurt, says Darwin Labarthe, MD, PhD, director of the CDC's division for heart disease and stroke prevention . "This is a very important message," Labarthe tells WebMD. "There is no room for debate any longer that a high level of salt causes stroke and heart disease , and that lowering salt intake will diminish these very serious health consequences." When you eat salt, your blood pressure goes up. And high blood pressure dramatically increases your risk of heart disease and stroke . Recent studies definitively show that people who eat too much salt significantly increase their risk of stroke and heart disease. This isn't exactly news. Ancient Chinese manuscripts describe a link between salt intake and high blood pressure . Yet over the last two decades, Americans' salt intake has gone up and up. Where's all that salt coming from? No, it's neither the salt sha Continue reading >>

Health Risks And Disease Related To Salt And Sodium

Health Risks And Disease Related To Salt And Sodium

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Health Risks and Disease Related to Salt and Sodium Whos at high risk of developing health problems related to salt consumption? People who have high or slightly elevated blood pressure What happens to my body if I eat too much sodium? In most people, the kidneys have trouble keeping up with the excess sodium in the bloodstream. As sodium accumulates, the body holds onto water to dilute the sodium. This increases both the amount of fluid surrounding cells and the volume of blood in the bloodstream. Increased blood volume means more work for the heart and more pressure on blood vessels. Over time, the extra work and pressure can stiffen blood vessels, leading to high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke. It can also lead to heart failure. There is also some evidence that too much salt can damage the heart, aorta, and kidneys without increasing blood pressure, and that it may be bad for bones, too. High blood pressure is a leading cause of cardiovascular disease. It accounts for two-thirds of all strokes and half of heart disease. ( 1 ) In China, high blood pressure is the leading cause of preventable death, responsible for more than one million deaths a year. ( 2 ) Sodium and potassium have opposite effects on heart health: High salt intake increases blood pressure, which can lead to heart disease, while high potassium intake can help relax blood vessels and excrete the sodium and decrease blood pressure. Our bodies need far more potassium than sodium each day, but the typical US diet is just the opposite: Americans average about 3,300 milligrams of sodium per day, about 75 percent of which comes from processed foods, while only getting about 2,900 milligrams of potassium each day. ( 3 , 4 ) A recent study in Archives of Int Continue reading >>

How Much Is Too Much Salt? - Unitypoint Health

How Much Is Too Much Salt? - Unitypoint Health

Should you avoid salt? Some sources claim it isnt as bad for your health as once thought. David Trachtenbarg, MD , UnityPoint Health, says having too much salt in your diet is entirely possible, and while you do need some salt in your body, he explains the reasons why watching your salt intake still matters. On average, Dr. Trachtenbarg says most people consume between 9,000-12,000 milligrams of sodium a day, roughly over three times the recommended amount. He suggests keeping daily sodium levels at 2,300 milligrams maximum, with less than 1,500 milligrams being preferred, especially for adults with high blood pressure. For most people, there are no side effects of having too much sodium, Dr. Trachtenbarg says. But, that doesnt mean salt cant have a negative effect on the body. He lists the health impacts of consuming excess sodium: Blood pressure. Eating too much salt is linked to hypertension, or high blood pressure . Reducing salt intake to 5,000-6,000 milligrams per day has shown to lower blood pressure. Heart health. If you have heart disease or congestive heart failure, extra salt can cause fluid retention, which can lead to shortness of breath and hospitalization. Kidney function. If you have kidney disease, too much salt in your diet may cause you to retain fluid, leading to weight gain and bloating. Diabetes. While not directly connected to blood sugar, eating too much salt increases the risk of complications from diabetes. Nearly every processed food has added salt, Dr. Trachtenbarg says. When eating processed foods, its important to look at the amount of sodium listed on the nutrition label. The simplest way to reduce the amount of salt in your diet is avoiding processed foods and not adding salt to your meal. Dr. Trachtenbarg encourages you to look closely Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Sugar Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Because type 2 diabetes is linked to high levels of sugar in the blood, it may seem logical to assume that eating too much sugar is the cause of the disease. But of course, it’s not that simple. “This has been around for years, this idea that eating too much sugar causes diabetes — but the truth is, type 2 diabetes is a multifactorial disease with many different types of causes,” says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a nutrition coach in Prescott, Arizona, and a medical reviewer for Everyday Health. “Type 2 diabetes is really complex.” That said, some research does suggest that eating too many sweetened foods can affect type 2 diabetes risk, and with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimating that 30.3 million Americans have the disease — and that millions of more individuals are projected to develop it, too — understanding all the risk factors for the disease, including sugar consumption, is essential to help reverse the diabetes epidemic. The Sugar and Type 2 Diabetes Story: Not So Sweet After the suspicion that sugar was the cause of diabetes, the scientific community pointed its finger at carbohydrates. That makes sense, notes Grieger, explaining that simple and complex carbohydrates are both metabolized as sugar, leading blood sugar levels to fluctuate. Yet carbs are processed differently in the body based on their type: While simple carbs are digested and metabolized quickly, complex carbs take longer to go through this system, resulting in more stable blood sugar. “It comes down to their chemical forms: A simple carbohydrate has a simpler chemical makeup, so it doesn’t take as much for it to be digested, whereas the complex ones take a little longer,” Grieger explains. Sources of complex carbohydrates include whole-wheat bread an Continue reading >>

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

5 Common Food Myths For People With Diabetes Debunked

There are many misconceptions that people with diabetes must follow a strict diet, when in reality they can eat anything a person without diabetes eats. Amy Campbell, MS, RD, LDN, CDE, nutritionist at Joslin Diabetes Center and co-author of 16 Myths of a "Diabetic Diet," debunks some common food myths for people with diabetes. 1. People with diabetes have to eat different foods from the rest of the family. People with diabetes can eat the same foods as the rest of their family. Current nutrition guidelines for diabetes are very flexible and offer many choices, allowing people with diabetes to fit in favorite or special-occasion foods. Everyone, whether they have diabetes or not, should eat a healthful diet that consists of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein foods, and heart-healthy fats. So, if you have diabetes, there's no need to cook separately from your family. 2. People with diabetes should never give in to food cravings. Almost everyone has food cravings at some point, and people with diabetes are no exception. It's not uncommon for people with diabetes to cut out all sweets or even cut way back on food portions in order to lose weight. In turn, your body often responds to these drastic changes by creating cravings. Nine times out of ten, your food choices in these situations tend to be high in fat and/or sugar, too. The best way to deal with food cravings is to try to prevent them by following a healthy eating plan that lets you occasionally fit sweets into your diabetes meal plan. If a craving does occur, let yourself have a small taste of whatever it is you want. By doing so, you can enjoy the flavor and avoid overeating later on. 3. People with diabetes shouldn't eat too many starchy foods, even if they contain fiber, because starch raises your blo Continue reading >>

Diabetes News: Eating Too Much Of This Type Of Food Could Raise Your Risk

Diabetes News: Eating Too Much Of This Type Of Food Could Raise Your Risk

Diabetes news: Eating too much of THIS type of food could raise your risk EATING too much salty food dramatically raises the risk of diabetes, warns new research. A study of almost 3,000 people found those who consumed the most salt were almost twice as likely to develop diabetes. And the risk rose almost four-fold for those genetically predisposed to the condition, according to the research. Just under half a teaspoon (2.5g) extra a day increased the risk of type 2 diabetes, the form linked to obesity, by 65 percent. Participants with the highest consumption - one-and-a-quarter teaspoons or more - were 72 percent more likely to develop it than those with the lowest. The risk of developing LADA (Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults), a form of type 1 diabetes, was even greater, increasing 82 per cent rise for each 2.5g consumed daily. Diabetes news: Eating too much of THIS type of food could raise your risk People should be aware signs and symptoms of diabetes are not always obvious and the condition is often diagnosed during GP check ups. [Getty Images] Dr Rasouli added: These findings may have important implications in the primary prevention of diabetes with adult onset. There are currently around 4.5 million people in the UK who now have diabetes, with 90 per cent of cases thought to be type 2. But the condition can be very significantly improved through a simple, healthy diet. The NHS advises adults should eat no more than 6g of salt a day, about a teaspoon, and children even less. The research, presented at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes in Portugal, is the strongest yet to link diabetes with high salt consumption, which is known to be bad for health by increasing blood pressure. Dr Rasouli and colleagues, whose findings are also published in t Continue reading >>

More in diabetes