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Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit

Yes, You Can Eat Too Much Fruit — And It Could Be Messing With Your Diet

Yes, You Can Eat Too Much Fruit — And It Could Be Messing With Your Diet

Fruits are key to healthy eating, but they can be consumed to excess. Nutritionist Andy Bellatti told INSIDER that juicing may make fruits easier to overconsume. It also decreases their health benefits. Sugar intake from fruits may be a concern for people who deal with health issues related to high blood sugar Some people argue that there's no limit to the amount of fruit you can eat daily, and follow a fruitarian diet, subsisting primarily on apples, oranges, and the like. Others, like those who follow the keto diet, tend to restrict the amount of fruit they eat in a day, citing concern about fructose levels. With so many conflicting opinions, it's difficult to know how much fruit you should be eating every day. To learn more about optimal fruit intake, INSIDER spoke with dietitians Andy Bellatti and Jen Bruning (who is also the media spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics.) Obviously, there are many physical — and even psychological — benefits to eating fruit. First, it's only fair to consider the many health benefits from eating a variety of fruit. As a rich source of vitamins, minerals, potassium, and fiber, fruits often contain phytochemicals that have antioxidant properties, according to Berkeley Wellness. Fresh fruit may even improve a person's psychological health. According to a 2017 study in PLOS ONE, eating fruits (and vegetables) correlated with an increase in psychological well-being in young adults. In fact, these psychological benefits occurred after only two weeks of increased fruit and vegetable consumption. With all of these health benefits, it is not surprising that the American Heart Association recommends at least four servings of fruit each day. That said, consuming too much fruit can lead to health problems for some individuals. Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

Diabetes is complicated and as such, you should try to avoid getting the disease to the maximum possible extent. In question today, are the otherwise healthy source of nutrients for diabetics, that is fruits. It is surprising that researchers could even question whether eating too much of fruit can be bad for people who suffer from diabetes. However, when you deeply analyze the various causes and factors that could expose you to a greater risk of developing the condition, you will understand the logic behind such a thought process. In this article, we have tried to understand the analyze the same. So, come and join us for the article “Can You Get Diabetes from Eating Too Much Fruit?” How Can Eating Too Much Fruit Lead to Diabetes? The main type of sugar that is present in the fruits we eat is the fructose. The other forms of sugar such as glucose metabolizes in the blood, while fructose does so in the liver. So, when you eat too much of fruit, too much of fructose accumulates in the liver. When the sugar is more than the required quantity, your liver breaks down the same into triglycerides. The increase in the levels of triglycerides, as we know, is one of the many reasons that could expose you to a greater risk of getting diabetes as triglycerides are often stored as fat in different body cells. When you eat too much fruit, you often find it difficult to lose weight, particularly your belly fat. This, as we know, is a major contributor to diabetes, particularly type 2. Relation Between Eating Too Much Fruit and Type 2 Diabetes As you know, type 2 diabetes is a complex disease and is caused due to various factors. One important cause is the high levels of sugar which increase glucose in your blood. However, the relationship between the sugar from fruits and type 2 d Continue reading >>

Daily Diet Of Fresh Fruit Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

Daily Diet Of Fresh Fruit Linked To Lower Diabetes Risk

"Eating fresh fruit daily could cut risk of diabetes by 12%," the Mail Online reports. A study of half a million people in China found those who ate fruit daily were 12% less likely to get type 2 diabetes than those who never or rarely ate it. It was also found that people with diabetes at the start of the study who ate fruit regularly were slightly less likely to die, or to get complications of diabetes, such as eye problems (diabetic retinopathy), during the study than those who ate fruit rarely or never. Many people with diabetes in China avoid eating fruit, because they are told it raises blood sugar. However, the study suggests fresh fruit may actually be beneficial for people with and without diabetes. Fruits which release sugars more slowly into the blood, such as apples, pears and oranges, are the most popular in China, according to the researchers. So this may be the preferred option if you are worried about diabetes risk, or have been diagnosed with diabetes. The study doesn't show that fruit directly prevents diabetes or diabetes complications, as an inherent limitation of this type of study is that other factors could be involved. And it doesn't tell us how much fruit might be too much. Overall, the research suggests fresh fruit can be part of a healthy diet for everyone. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the University of Oxford, and Peking University, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China National Center for Food Safety Risk Assessment, Non-communicable Disease Prevention and Control Department, and Pengzhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, all in China. It was funded by the Kadoorie Charitable Foundation. The study was published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Medicine on an open-access basis, so Continue reading >>

Should You Limit Your Fruit Intake?

Should You Limit Your Fruit Intake?

Do you ever worry about the natural sugar found in fresh fruit? Common sense should tell us that refined sugar is NOT the same as the sugar in fruit, but it’s still common to hear that you need to limit your sugar intake, and many experts throw fruit into that category. After doing some digging, I’m convinced that the body does treat the sugar in fruit differently, and I’ve got research to back me up. So, today I’m going to address some common concerns about fruit using peer-reviewed studies in the hopes that it will lay any of your fruit fears to rest. 1. Can you eat too much fruit? In a Harvard health publication, fruit is declared to be beneficial in almost any amount. A small study even put that theory to the test, having subjects consume a whopping 20 servings of fruit each day! Despite the high fructose content of this high-fruit diet, subjects had no adverse effects on body weight, blood pressure, insulin, or lipid levels. Another small study showed that a group eating 20 servings of fruit over a period of just 2 weeks significantly lowered LDL cholesterol, and possibly reduced the risk of cardiovascular disease and colon cancer. (Other studies have shown that added sugar negatively affects cholesterol levels, with higher sugar consumption driving HDL cholesterol lower and triglicerides higher.) 2. Should diabetics limit fruit intake? In this study, diabetics were divided into two groups. The group who reduced their fruit consumption showed no difference in weight, waist circumference, or diabetes management when compared to the group who ate at least two or more pieces of fruit each day. The researchers ultimately concluded that fruit should not be restricted in patients with type 2 diabetes. 3. What about “sweet” fruits? In another study, my favorit Continue reading >>

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Cause Diabetes?

Can Eating Too Much Fruit Cause Diabetes?

Can eating too much fruit cause diabetes? According to a new study, eating plenty of fruit during pregnancy was strongly associated with developing gestational diabetes. 1 Women eating lots of fruit had almost an almost 400% percent increase in risk of developing diabetes! Scientific reports: Excessive fruit consumption during the second trimester is associated with increased likelihood of gestational diabetes mellitus: a prospective study As usual, this kind of observational study do not prove causation, but the massive effect in this case (a 400 percent increase in risk!) is hard to explain away. Fruit is full of sugar, so the connection shouldn’t be too surprising. And while fruit is considered very natural, the fruit you find in the supermarket today has been grown to be both bigger and sweeter than it used to be in nature. So if you have, or are at risk of developing diabetes, it’s likely smart to limit your consumption of sugary fruits. Check out our guide below for the worst and best kinds of fruit on a low-carb diet. Earlier What Fruits and Vegetables Looked like Before Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Sugar?

Sugar is irresistible to most people. So irresistible, in fact, that sugar cravings might be rooted in evolution. Craving sugary foods, or so the theory goes, could help prevent starvation. In a modern world, however, where food is often plentiful, sugar consumption is linked to diabetes, obesity, and other health problems. Research into the connection between sugar consumption and diabetes is ongoing. Most doctors argue that sugar alone does not trigger diabetes. But some emerging research suggests a closer link between sugar consumption and diabetes than was previously thought. Can people get diabetes from eating too much sugar? Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body's ability to regulate blood glucose levels. But eating sugar will not cause type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition, which causes the body to attack cells that produce insulin. Damage to these cells undermines the body's ability to manage blood glucose. Type 2 diabetes is more complex. Sugar consumption will not directly cause diabetes. However, excess sugar consumption can cause weight gain. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes. Once a person has diabetes, eating too much sugar can make symptoms worse, since diabetes makes it more difficult for the body to manage blood sugar levels. Understanding the link between sugar and diabetes Although eating sugar is not directly linked to developing diabetes, some evidence suggests that increased overall availability of sugar makes diabetes more common. A 2013 study that looked at 175 different countries found that more sugar in the food supply increased diabetes rates. Specifically, for every additional 150 calories of sugar available per day per person, diabetes levels rose 1 percent. This change continued even when researchers con Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Too Much Fruit In A Day?

Can You Eat Too Much Fruit In A Day?

Whoever said "moderation in all things" was certainly right when it comes to fruit. Loaded with vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, water and fiber, fruit plays an important role in maintaining good health. If you eat fruit regularly, you may reduce your risk of heart disease, certain cancers and possibly even vision loss, says the Harvard School of Public Health. However, consuming too much fruit can also have a negative impact if you have certain health conditions. Video of the Day If you're concerned with your weight, consuming too much fruit may contribute to weight gain or hinder weight loss. Fruit is a low-calorie food compared to other groups such as meats, fats and grains, but still contains energy. Even low-calorie foods can add up if you take in more calories than your body needs each day, says the American Dietetic Association. If you are watching your weight, take caution regarding fruit juices and dried fruit, which contain denser amounts of sugar and calories than whole fruit and are easier to consume in excess. Juices also tend to lack fiber, which promotes appetite control. Displaced Nutrients While fruits contain a variety of nutrients, they don't have all the nutrients you need for good health. As carbohydrate-rich foods, fruits lack the essential fatty acids and amino acids that other food groups, such as meats, nuts and legumes, provide. Fruits are also deficient in certain minerals, like calcium, heme-iron and selenium. When fruit is part of a varied diet, this is not an problem. But if you fill up on fruit consistently at the expense of other healthy foods, you could become deficient in some essential nutrients. If you've gorged yourself in a strawberry patch or eating a few too many prunes, you may have learned firsthand that too much fruit can wrea Continue reading >>

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

Can You Get Diabetes From Eating Too Much Fruit?

What Happens If a Diabetic Eats Too Much Sugar In pre-diabetes, which can lead to type 2 diabetes, the cells become resistant to the action of insulin, and your pancreas is unable to make enough insulin to overcome this resistance. Instead of moving into your cells where it's needed for energy, sugar builds up in your bloodstream. and causes the following common symptoms How do you know if you have diabetes? Constant hunger and fatigue and the need for sugary snacks and drinks as a pick up is a warning sign. Your body converts the food you eat into glucose that your cells use for energy, Peeing more often and being thirstier. The average person usually has to pee between four and seven times in 24 hours, but people with diabetes may go a lot more, Dry mouth and itchy skin, Blurred vision Diabetes is the condition in which the body does not properly process refined carbohydrates, especially fructose for use as energy. Most of the food we eat is turned into glucose, or sugar, for our bodies to use for energy. The pancreas, an organ that lies near the stomach, makes a hormone called insulin to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies. What causes lack of insulin in the body? This may result from type 1 diabetes when someone is born with the condition. It also occurs when insulin-producing cells are damaged or destroyed and stop producing insulin. Insulin is needed to move blood sugar into cells throughout the body. The resulting insulin deficiency leaves too much sugar in the blood and not enough in the cells for energy Can you get diabetes from eating too much sugar in one day? Short answer is NO Sugar doesn't cause diabetes to occur in one day. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary fo Continue reading >>

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Are You Eating Too Much Fruit?

Photo: Pond5 Loading your diet with fruit seems like a no-brainer, right? Your body gets a boost from nutritious superstars like fiber, vitamins, and antioxidants, plus juicy berries might even satisfy your sweet tooth. But that doesn’t mean maintaining a 24/7 fruit free-for-all is good for your health. “Fruit is high in a sugar known as fructose. Even though the sugar is coming from this healthy source, you still have to use moderation,” says Brigitte Zeitlin, MPH, RD, CDN, a dietitian at B-Nutritious. If you’re panicking because you’ve been devouring fruit salad to your heart’s content, don’t worry. Here’s what you need to know about how much fruit you should really be eating every day. Why Eating Too Much Fruit Might Impact Your Health Sugar comes in a few different forms: Glucose, fructose and sucrose. Glucose helps keep all your systems chugging along smoothly. “Carbohydrates break down into glucose, your body’s main source of fuel,” says Beth Warren, MS, RDN, CDN, registered dietitian and author of Living a Real Life with Real Food. Then you have fructose, the only type of sugar found in fruits. It’s metabolized in the liver, as opposed to in the blood stream. Sucrose, more commonly known as table sugar, is simply a combination of both glucose and fructose. High blood sugar, which is caused by too much glucose in your blood, can lead to diabetes. Refined carbohydrates, like white rice or white-flour baked goods, are common culprits leading to high blood sugar. In addition to their sugar content, they lack the fiber that prevents glucose spikes, wreaking havoc on your blood sugar levels. “Too much sugar in the blood stream at once leads to fat storage and insulin resistance, a precursor to type 2 diabetes,” says Zeitlin. The lesser-known Continue reading >>

Yes, You Can Eat Too Much Fruit — And It Could Be Messing With Your Diet

Yes, You Can Eat Too Much Fruit — And It Could Be Messing With Your Diet

Some people argue that there's no limit to the amount of fruit you can eat daily, and follow a fruitarian diet, subsisting primarily on apples, oranges, and the like. Others, like those who follow the keto diet, tend to restrict the amount of fruit they eat in a day, citing concern about fructose levels. With so many conflicting opinions, it's difficult to know how much fruit you should be eating every day. To learn more about optimal fruit intake, INSIDER spoke with dietitians Andy Bellatti and Jen Bruning (who is also the media spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics.) Obviously, there are many physical — and even psychological — benefits to eating fruit. First, it's only fair to consider the many health benefits from eating a variety of fruit. As a rich source of vitamins, minerals, potassium, and fiber, fruits often contain phytochemicals that have antioxidant properties, according to Berkeley Wellness. Fresh fruit may even improve a person's psychological health. According to a 2017 study in PLOS ONE, eating fruits (and vegetables) correlated with an increase in psychological well-being in young adults. In fact, these psychological benefits occurred after only two weeks of increased fruit and vegetable consumption. With all of these health benefits, it is not surprising that the American Heart Association recommends at least four servings of fruit each day. That said, consuming too much fruit can lead to health problems for some individuals. So how can you tell if you've overdone it on the peaches? Although it may seem like to road to health is paved with goji berries, it's important to remember that fruit is not the end-all be-all of nutrition. To start, eating fruit to the exclusion of other foods can lead to potential nutritional deficiencies. Continue reading >>

Eating Too Much Fruit?

Eating Too Much Fruit?

Yes, it can. Mother Nature clearly intended creatures of the earth to eat fruit. Fruit is delicious and appealing to animals so that they can help plants spread their seeds. Fruit offers quick energy in the form of sugar, as well as vitamins, minerals, fiber, antioxidant pigments, and other phytocompounds that reduce risks of disease. The main problem with fruit these days is that so little of it available to us is any good. The varieties in commercial production are much less nutritious than ancestral ones. Much fruit is picked before it is ripe, which is favorable to shippers and distributors but not to consumers. Then there is the problem of agrichemical residues. I try to get organic fruit. If I can’t, I peel fruit when possible or wash it in a weak soap-and-water solution to remove what’s on the surface. However, with some crops, such as strawberries, systemic pesticides are used that permeate the flesh of the fruit and cannot be washed off. If you’re trying to lose weight, eating a lot of fruit can sabotage your efforts. While calorie counts are modest in many types of fresh fruit, they can skyrocket if you’re sipping a lot of fruit juice, making smoothies (which can add up to 300 calories or more) or consuming a lot of dried fruits, which are a source of concentrated sugar. People who eat a lot of fruit are often health and weight-conscious but can’t understand why they’re not losing pounds. Eating too much fruit can also raise your serum triglycerides, which can increase cardiovascular risk. The high glycemic load of some forms of fruit can provoke insulin resistance and worsen metabolic syndrome. People with this problem are advised to eat only whole fruits and limit servings of dried fruits to one-quarter cup per day. If you eat canned fruits, choo Continue reading >>

This Is How Much Fruit You Should Actually Eat In A Day

This Is How Much Fruit You Should Actually Eat In A Day

People say fruit is nature’s candy for a reason. There’s nothing like biting into a ripe, juicy peach, achieving just the right level of banana flavor in your smoothie, or going to town on a perfect handful of blueberries. Unfortunately, as healthy as fruit is, you can overdo it on the sweet stuff, experts say. We get it: Nothing is sacred. Here, the facts you need to know. “This is a little bit complicated, because I don’t ever want to send a message that fruit is not a good choice,” Marisa Moore, R.D.N. and consultant in Atlanta, Georgia, tells SELF, but because sugar is the source of fruit’s sweet goodness, you should actually pay attention to how much you eat every day. For all the benefits of fruit you should definitely not miss out on, it’s possible to go overboard. Obviously, fruit is excellent for you. Different kinds offer important nutrients Americans are often skimping on, like potassium, fiber, vitamin C, and folate, Moore explains. “You get all of those in fruit, so you do want to eat them regularly,” she says. Plus, fruit = carbs which = energy. The problem is that people sometimes view fruit as having “negative” or “free” calories, which definitely isn’t the case. This idea has become especially popular since Weight Watchers designated all fruits and vegetables as having zero “points,” the measurement the brand uses to track food intake. Weight Watchers decided to assign produce with zero points to encourage people to eat more of it, which is fitting, as most people don't get enough. One common way people take in too much fruit, Moore says, is smoothies. Because they’re a “health food,” people may not realize that a single 16-ounce smoothie can pack 46 grams sugar into 220 calories. “Smoothies can absolutely be a he Continue reading >>

Do We Really Need To Worry About Eating Too Much Fruit?

Do We Really Need To Worry About Eating Too Much Fruit?

ICYMI, #nosugar diets are all over Instagram these days—with good reason. Sugar can be a major diet saboteur. But some celebs, like Millionaire Matchmaker Patti Stanger, are taking it too far, touting the benefits of cutting out all sugar—even fruit—to reach their #gymgoals. But is depriving yourself of fruit smoothies and bowls of watermelon really necessary in the name of good health? Turns out, this is mostly baloney, according to Alissa Rumsey, R.D., spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetic. So where does the misconception that fruit will foil your diet come from? It starts with the confusion surrounding the pros and cons of natural sugars versus added sugars, says Rumsey. Natural sugars are found in fruits, dairy products, and starchy veggies and your body and brain uses them for fuel. Without the natural sugars found in fruits, we’d be at a major energy deficit, she says. Plus, the other nutrients found in fruit help prevent the sugar rush (and crash) you get from eating candy. “When you eat natural forms of sugar like that in fruit, dairy, and starchy vegetables, you get additional nutrients like fiber and protein, which help to blunt the blood sugar rise,” says Rumsey. (Reboot the way you eat and lose weight with Women's Health's The Body Clock Diet!) It’s the added sugars—found in sodas, juices, and flavored, processed foods—that cause the whole category to be vilified. In short, natural sugars=good for you, added sugars=bad for you. But there is one major caveat. “Too much sugar, of any type, causes your blood sugar to rise, which triggers insulin release,” says Rumsey. “Since insulin is a storage hormone, it likes to store excess blood sugar as fat, particularly belly fat. And excess sugar consumption has also been linked Continue reading >>

Is It Possible To Eat Too Much Fruit?

Is It Possible To Eat Too Much Fruit?

We’ve talked before about how the sugar in whole foods (like fruits and vegetables) is necessary and healthy. The clarification that is not made enough by the media or by health professionals is the difference between sugar in its natural state and sugar that’s been extracted from its natural package. In this NutritionFacts.org video, Dr. Michael Greger explores the research on how much fruit we can eat in one day. We’ve also summarized his main points below. In one study, scientists found that adding blueberries to meals can blunt the effect of high-glycemic foods. But how many berries do you need to eat to benefit? If you eat a bowl of sugary breakfast cereal by itself, so many free radicals are created within two hours that your body goes into oxidative debt. The antioxidants in your blood drops to below where it was before breakfast. How many berries do you need to eat with the cereal to get a positive effect? One quarter cup of berries doesn’t help much, but one half cup does. What About Fruit for Type 2 Diabetics? Most dietary recommendations for type 2 diabetics suggest eating fiber-rich foods including fruit. That’s because fruit is healthy and has been shown to improve artery function and reduce cancer risk. However, some health professionals restrict the amount of fruit they recommend because they’re worried about the sugar content of fruit. But what does the research say? In one study, type 2 diabetics were put into two groups. One group was told to eat a minimum of two pieces of fruit a day, and the other was told to eat no more than two pieces of fruit a day. There were no positive effects or weight changes in the group that had reduced their fruit intake. (Editor’s Note: There were also no positive effects on HbA1c or waist circumference in t Continue reading >>

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