diabetestalk.net

Can You Get Diabetes From Depression?

The Diabetes And Depression Connection

The Diabetes And Depression Connection

Theres a link between diabetes and depressionbut its not what researchers initially thought Nina Flores started feeling down about 17 years ago, not long after the birth of her first child. She had always been happy and outgoing, but now it was as if a gray cloud had descended and refused to lift. Everyone expects you to smile, but you cant, she says. You just feel sad, for no reason. As the years went by, Floress depression took a toll on her daily life and her family. She found it hard to get out of bed, let alone eat well and exercise. After nearly a decade, her doctor prescribed antidepressant medication, and soon she began to feel like her old self again. Last year, however, Flores was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes . Learning to manage it has taken a tolland, she says, triggered another bout of depression. It feels like the medication doesnt work as well as it used to, she says. I get gray days more often than before [my diagnosis]. Floress experience is in keeping with new research into the links between diabetes and depression. Researchers have known for decades that clinical depression is a common problem for people with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, who suffer at similar rates. Much more than feeling sad once in a while, clinical depression is a long-lasting and more-crippling disorder that interferes with daily life and relationships. And its deeply interconnected with diabetesso deeply that researchers now think it is a two-way relationship: People with diabetes are more likely to develop depression, and people with depression are more likely to develop diabetes. The reason for the overlap between depression and diabetes once seemed obvious: Doctors figured people were simply depressed about their diabetes. The shock of a life-changing diagnosis, the bur Continue reading >>

Depression In Diabetes Mellitus: A Comprehensive Review

Depression In Diabetes Mellitus: A Comprehensive Review

Go to: Mental disorders, in general, in patients with diabetes mellitus(DM) Patients with DM seem not to be at higher risk for a mental disorder in general compared to non-diabetic individuals. In a cross-sectional population-based study by Kruse et al1 among 141 patients with DM, identified out of a community sample of 4169 individuals, the prevalence of any mental disorder - assessed with the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) - was comparable between the patients with DM and the non-diabetic individuals [26.6% vs 26.0%; Odds Ratio(OR)=1.11; Confidence Interval (CI):0.73-1.69]. Notably, after adjusting for age, sex, socioeconomic and family status, no significant difference between the two groups was found, concerning affective, somatoform, substance abuse/dependence disorders; only anxiety disorders were found to be significantly more prevalent in the diabetic group (OR=2.05; CI:1.22-3.43). Das-Munshi et al2 in another cross-sectional population-based study of 249 patients with diabetes, identified out of a sample of 8580 individuals, reported that the prevalence of any mental disorder - assessed with the Clinical Interview Schedule-Revised (CIS-R) - was 21.6% in the diabetic group vs 16.3% in the non-diabetic group. The crude (unadjusted) odds ratio was non-significant (OR=1.4; CI:1.0-2.0), whereas after adjusting for age, sex and socioeconomical status it became significant (OR=1.5;1.1-2.2; p<0.05). Finally, after adjusting further for impairment in everyday functioning and medical comorbidity, the odds ratio was attenuated again in non-significant levels (OR=1.3; CI:0.9-1.9). The same pattern also apllied to mixed anxiety and depression, whereas the odds ratio concerning depressive, anxiety, comorbid anxiety depressive disorders was not statistica Continue reading >>

The Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Depression

The Association Between Diabetes Mellitus And Depression

Go to: Depression occurrence is two to three times higher in people with diabetes mellitus, the majority of the cases remaining under-diagnosed. The purpose of this review was to show the links between depression and diabetes, point out the importance of identifying depression in diabetic patients and identify the possible ways to address both diseases. Possible common pathophysiological mechanisms as stress and inflammation were explained, while emphasis was made on screening for depression in diabetic patients. An important aspect for the diabetic specialist would be the understanding of the common origins of diabetes and depression and the awareness of this quite common comorbidity, in order to improve the outcomes of both diseases. Abbreviations: DALYS = disability adjusted life years, DSM-5 = American Psychiatric Association Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, DM1 = Type 1 diabetes mellitus, DM2 = Type 2 diabetes mellitus, HPA-axis = hypothalamus – pituitary – adrenal axis, SNS = sympathetic nervous system, BDI = Beck Depression Inventory, CES-D = Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, HADS = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, PHQ = Patient Health Questionnaire. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, depression, comorbidity, epidemiology Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Cause Depression, Depression Can Cause Diabetes

Diabetes May Cause Depression, Depression Can Cause Diabetes

The link between depression and diabetes risk works the other way round too; diabetes can cause depression. Put simply, diabetes can cause depression and depression can cause diabetes, researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health wrote in Archives of Internal Medicine. Over 10% of all US adults have diabetes; for those aged at least 60 years the figure is 23%. About 14.8 million Americans are affected by a major depressive disorder annually. The authors explained: "Although it has been hypothesized that the diabetes-depression relation is bidirectional, few studies have addressed this hypothesis in a prospective setting." An Pan, Ph.D., and team gathered data on 65,381 adult females aged 50 to 75 to see what the relationship between diabetes and depression might be. The women had to fill in an initial questionnaire with details about health practices and their medical history. Follow-up questionnaires were completed every two years for ten years until the end of 2006. The investigators classified participants with depression as those diagnosed with the disease by a doctor, and/or taking antidepressants. Those who said they had depression were given another questionnaire to fill in with questions about their depression, including symptoms, treatments and diagnostic tests. Depression to diabetes risk During the whole study period 2,844 females developed type 2 diabetes and 7,415 were identified with depression. Those with depression had a 17% higher risk of developing diabetes - even after the researchers ruled out certain risk factors, such as BMI (body mass index) and physical activity. The women on antidepressant medications had a 25% higher risk of developing diabetes compared to those without depression. Diabetes to depression risk The investigators also foun Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression

Diabetes And Depression

Managing type 1 or type 2 diabetes, chronic autoimmune diseases, can be highly challenging due to setbacks and many challenges along the way. The constant vigilance required to manage blood sugar, navigate health care services, medication side effects, and other related health conditions can lead to an increased risk of depression. Left untreated, depression can result in poor lifestyle choices that worsen physical health. If you have diabetes, or someone you love does, it’s important to be aware of the risk of developing depression. Researchers have found that the two conditions occur twice as frequently as you would predict based on chance, meaning that diabetes and depression affect each other in some ways. 1 The relationship between type 2 diabetes and depression is bidirectional, meaning that each can put a person at risk for the other.2 If a person has depression, they are at a higher risk of leading a sedentary lifestyle and eating foods that are sugary or fatty, which can lead to type 2 diabetes. If they already have type 2 diabetes, the burnout that can come with managing the disease, can lead to depression. Meanwhile, people with type 1 diabetes— which is not caused by diet or lifestyle factors, but rather a result of a pancreas that cannot manufacture insulin—can also be incredibly challenging to manage, which puts one at risk for developing depressive symptoms.3 Once depressive symptoms develop, it can become increasingly difficult to manage diabetes and can lead to physical complications and decreased life expectancy. If you’re not sure whether you might be suffering from depression, you can look for these signs:4 Lack of interest in activities Depressed mood or irritability Changes in sleep patterns Changes in appetite Feelings of guilt or despair Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression –

Diabetes And Depression –

If you have both diabetes and depression, you have a lot of company. Researchers estimate that people with diabetes are three or four times more likely to have depression than the average person. While depression affects somewhere around 5 percent of the general population at any given moment, the rate is about 15 to 20 percent for people with diabetes. If you have diabetes complications, your risk of depression is even higher. Furthermore, if you have depression, your risk of developing diabetes may also be higher. Depression is a state of very intense, long-lasting sadness or despair—not just “feeling blue” for a short time or feeling sad because of a sad event in your life. Depression is sadness so severe that it becomes difficult, or even impossible, for you to continue the responsibilities of your daily life, such as working, taking care of and spending time with family and friends, going to school, or even doing the things you usually enjoy. Depression often has physical symptoms as well, such as changes in appetite and sleeping habits. What Is the Relationship Between Diabetes and Depression? For many years, people thought that it was obvious that depression was the result of having diabetes. For example, when I was in nursing schoolin the late 1970’s, I have a distinct memory of hearing one of my instructors tell my class that depression and diabetes seemed to go hand-in-hand. “After all,” she said, “Who wouldn’t be depressed? You have to give yourself shots every day. You have to restrict your eating, and you never get to eat a real dessert. And no matter what you do you’re still at risk of having an amputation, going blind, or losing your kidneys.” But, of course, many people with diabetes handle their self-management without getting depres Continue reading >>

New Links Seen Between Depression And Diabetes

New Links Seen Between Depression And Diabetes

Archives of Internal Medicine. "People usually think of these as two isolated conditions, but there is growing evidence that they are linked behaviorally and biologically,” says study researcher Frank Hu, MD, PhD, MPH, professor of nutrition and epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston. “This data provide strong evidence that we should not consider these two isolated conditions any longer.” About 23.5 million Americans have diabetes, and about 14.8 million Americans have major depressive disorder in a given year, according to statistics in the new report. Of the 65,381 women aged 50 to 75 in 1996 who were study participants, 2,844 women were newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and 7,415 women developed depression in the ensuing 10 years. Depression and Diabetes Risk Depression increased the risk for diabetes, and diabetes increased the risk for depression, the study shows. Specifically, women who were depressed were 17% more likely to develop diabetes even after the researchers adjusted for other risk factors such as weight and lack of regular exercise. Those women who were taking antidepressants were 25% more likely to develop diabetes than their counterparts who were not depressed, the study shows. Women with diabetes were 29% more likely to develop depression after taking into account other depression risk factors, and those women who took insulin for their diabetes were 53% more likely to develop depression during the 10-year study. While certain factors such as physical activity and body mass index may partially explain the link between depression and diabetes, they do not completely explain the connection, Hu tells WebMD. The common denominator may be stress, Hu says. People who are depressed have elevated levels of stress hormones such Continue reading >>

Depression And Its Relationship To Type 1

Depression And Its Relationship To Type 1

Editor’s Note: This is part of our Mental Health series. Type 1 isn’t just about counting carbs, checking BGLs and administering insulin. The disease takes an emotional and psychological toll as well. Check out other clinical information and personal stories about Mental Health. Are depression and diabetes related? The simple answer: yes. Research shows that if you have diabetes, your risk of developing depression more than doubles. In fact, some studies show, that it could be as high as four times more likely. And while this information may seem like just one more thing to worry about, it’s important to address and discuss, because doing so has the potential of improving your quality of life. And who doesn’t want that? Someone once said, “Diabetes is a full-time job that you didn’t apply for, you can’t quit and there’s no vacation or pay.” (We’re nodding.) Agreed — no one lined up for the diabetes merry-go-round or the diabetes loop-dee-loop, because diabetes isn’t fun. Actually, it’s a royal pain. And you never get a break. You know the drill: count carbs, administer insulin, (factor in activity, stress and consider what’s happened before), monitor blood sugars, rest, eat or compensate. And no matter how vigilant you are and how meticulously carbs are counted and insulin accordingly dosed, you’ll get the rogue BGL, the unexpected zinger that just makes you feel like chucking that juice box or screaming or crying or crawling into a ball and giving up because sometimes you can’t be perfect — no, you aren’t perfect and this diabetes thing is hard, really hard and just when you think you got it right and you’re really hitting your stride … you’re tested, you’re thrown and have to try again then again and again. It’s no wonder Continue reading >>

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

The Emotional Side Of Diabetes

Dealing with diabetes puts a lot of attention on blood glucose monitoring and insulin and medications—and those are important, of course. But there is an emotional side to diabetes and effects on your mental health that should be addressed, too. Diabetes interrupts your workday when you have to check your blood glucose. Diabetes means you can't just grab food whenever you want—you have to plan for it. Diabetes prolongs getting ready in the morning as you wash and inspect your feet. Diabetes frustrates you when your taste buds cry out for a pastry instead of an apple. Diabetes makes you worry about your future. All of the time, effort, money, and stress interrupts your emotional stability and introduces emotional complications—and it's okay to be frustrated or overwhelmed or scared. Diabetes and "Being in Control" Let's face it: most of us like being in control, and we don't like feeling that anything is out of our control. When it comes to diabetes, you can feel simultaneously in control and out of control. Out of control: Because of how diabetes affects your body, it is possible to feel that nothing is in your control anymore. You can't eat what you want when you want. You have to take medications or give yourself injections. You can start, perhaps, to feel that your body isn't your own anymore. How to counteract that "out of control" feeling: Taking a step back and an objective look at the situation may help. You can say to yourself, "Yes, diabetes makes me do these things, but diabetes does not run my life." A mantra along those lines—repeated at moments when you're feeling particularly out of control—can help. Also, you can do a mental mind shift: all these steps you're taking to manage your diabetes are actually proactive, healthy steps. You are taking co Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression: Coping With The Two Conditions

Diabetes And Depression: Coping With The Two Conditions

What's the connection between diabetes and depression? How can I cope if I have both? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes — either type 1 or type 2 — you have an increased risk of developing depression. And if you're depressed, you may have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news is that diabetes and depression can be treated together. And effectively managing one can have a positive effect on the other. How they're related Though the relationship between diabetes and depression isn't fully understood: The rigors of managing diabetes can be stressful and lead to symptoms of depression. Diabetes can cause complications and health problems that may worsen symptoms of depression. Depression can lead to poor lifestyle decisions, such as unhealthy eating, less exercise, smoking and weight gain — all of which are risk factors for diabetes. Depression affects your ability to perform tasks, communicate and think clearly. This can interfere with your ability to successfully manage diabetes. Managing the two conditions together Diabetes self-management programs. Diabetes programs that focus on behavior have been successful in helping people improve their metabolic control, increase fitness levels, and manage weight loss and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. They can also help improve your sense of well-being and quality of life. Psychotherapy. Similarly, participants in psychotherapy, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy, have reported improvements in depression, which has resulted in better diabetes management. Medications and lifestyle changes. Medications — for both diabetes and depression — and lifestyle changes, including different types of therapy coupled with regular exercise, can improve both conditions. C Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression

Diabetes And Depression

Depression can strike anyone, but people with diabetes may be at a greater risk. Diabetes is a serious health concern that afflicts an estimated 16 million Americans. Treatment for depression helps people manage symptoms of both diseases, thus improving the quality of their lives. Several studies suggest that diabetes doubles the risk of depression compared to those without the disorder. The chances of becoming depressed increase as diabetes complications worsen. Research shows that depression leads to poorer physical and mental functioning, so a person is less likely to follow a required diet or medication plan. Treating depression with psychotherapy, medication, or a combination of these treatments can improve a patient’s well-being and ability to manage diabetes. Causes underlying the association between depression and diabetes are unclear. Depression may develop because of stress but also may result from the metabolic effects of diabetes on the brain. Studies suggest that people with diabetes who have a history of depression are more likely to develop diabetic complications than those without depression. People who suffer from both diabetes and depression tend to have higher health care costs in primary care. Despite the enormous advances in brain research in the past 20 years, depression often goes undiagnosed and untreated. People with diabetes, their families and friends, and even their physicians may not distinguish the symptoms of depression. However, skilled health professionals will recognize these symptoms and inquire about their duration and severity, diagnose the disorder, and suggest appropriate treatment. The Basics About Depression Depression is a serious medical condition that affects thoughts, feelings, and the ability to function in everyday life. Continue reading >>

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression? Know The Facts

Is There A Link Between Diabetes And Depression? Know The Facts

Some studies show that having diabetes doubles your risk of developing depression. If diabetes-related health problems emerge, your risk for depression can increase even further. It remains unclear exactly why this is. Some researchers suggest that this could be due to diabetes' metabolic effect on brain function as well as the toll day-to-day management can take. It’s also possible that people with depression are more likely to develop diabetes. Because of this, it’s recommended that people who have a history of depression be screened for diabetes. Keep reading for more on the connection between diabetes and depression, as well as information on diagnosis, treatment, and more. Although more research is needed to fully understand the link between diabetes and depression, it’s clear that there’s a connection. It’s thought that alterations in brain chemistry tied to diabetes may be related to the development of depression. For example, damage resulting from diabetic neuropathy or blocked blood vessels in the brain may contribute to the development of depression in people with diabetes. Conversely, changes in the brain due to depression may cause an increased risk for complications. Studies have shown that people with depression are at higher risk for diabetes complications, but is has been difficult to determine which causes which. It hasn’t been determined if depression increases the risk for complications, or vice versa. Symptoms of depression can make it more difficult to successfully manage diabetes and prevent diabetes-related complications. A 2011 study found that people who have type 2 diabetes and experience symptoms of depression often have higher blood sugar levels. Additionally, the results of a separate 2011 study suggest that people who have both Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Depression

Type 2 Diabetes And Depression

Chronic illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, may cause more than physical problems. Dealing with a disease like type 2 diabetes means constantly being aware of what you eat, what you do, and how you live. And adjusting to life with diabetes does take effort. Yet even after you’ve adjusted, there may be times when the stress of a daily illness just gets you down. Most people feel blue from time to time. But depression isn’t just feeling sad or blue. Depression is a serious disorder that interferes with your life. If depression symptoms become severe, they may make it difficult to function well and manage daily activities like going to school or work, meeting family obligations, and monitoring your blood glucose. Depression and Diabetes: Who Is Affected According to statistics, depression affects people with diabetes more often than people without it — up to 15 percent compared with 6.7 percent in the general population. When depression occurs along with a chronic illness like type 2 diabetes, the symptoms tend to hit harder and be more severe. Compounding the problem further, the symptoms of the chronic illness can become worse if depression leads you to miss medication doses, overeat, or skip exercise. This could set off a downward cycle. For people with diabetes, this may mean poorer blood glucose control, which, in turn, means more long-term health complications. Researchers aren’t entirely clear on the relationship between diabetes and depression — is depression caused by diabetes, or do people who are already prone to developing depression experience it more severely if they also have type 2 diabetes? Whatever the connection, both illnesses need to be treated. The good news is that both depression and type 2 diabetes can improve when treated simultaneously. Continue reading >>

Depression And Mental Health

Depression And Mental Health

Depression is a very real condition and is becoming increasingly common in the general population; approximately one in four people will experience depression some time in their adult life. For people who live with diabetes, this figure is even higher. Up to 50% of people with diabetes are thought to also have a mental illness such as depression or anxiety. People with depression and diabetes may find it hard to maintain daily diabetes care Diabetes Australia and SANE have developed a booklet ‘The SANE Guide to Good Mental Health for people affected by diabetes’ which explains the relationship between diabetes and mental health and what you can do to look after yourself Depression is not just low mood but a serious illness. People with depression find it hard to do normal activities and function from day to day. Depression has serious effects on physical as well as mental health. Research shows that having diabetes more than doubles the risk of developing depression. Living with a chronic condition like diabetes, coping with biological and hormonal factors plus needing to manage the condition on a daily basis may increase the risk of depression. Depression can increase the likelihood of developing diabetes complications. People with depression may find it harder to deal with everyday tasks. Over time, managing diabetes (regular blood glucose testing, taking medication, following a healthy eating plan and regular physical activity) can take its toll. This may increase a person’s risk of depression, which may in turn lead to their usual diabetes care being neglected. A person may be depressed if for more than two weeks they have: Felt sad, down or miserable most of the time OR Lost interest or pleasure in most of their usual activities and Experienced symptoms in at Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression

Diabetes And Depression

Tweet According to NICE, people who are diagnosed with a chronic physical health problem such as diabetes are 3 times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than people without it. Depression can have a serious impact on a person's well being and their ability and motivation to self-manage their condition. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder witnessed in the diabetes community. People with diabetes suffering from depression are at greater risk of suffering from an episode of diabetic burnout which collectively can have adverse effects on physical health and potentially instigate more long term complications both to do with diabetes and independent from the condition. What exactly is depression? Depression is the term given when an individual experiences a number of symptoms including: Persistent sadness or anxiety, a feeling of hollowness An overriding feeling of hopelessness and negativity Feeling helpless and powerless to change your situation Loss of interest in activities or pleasures Lower energy and increased fatigue Insomnia, oversleeping, awakening early in the morning Concentration problems, memory problems and indecisiveness Dwelling on death or suicide Restlessness Weight change and decreased or increased appetite A diagnosis of depression is made if many of these symptoms are present, continuously, for a minimum of two weeks. For people with diabetes, dealing with a lifelong condition and managing the risk of complications can seem like an overwhelming task, particularly for newly diagnosed patients. Many diabetics struggle to cope with the requirements, feeling overwhelmed and unmotivated. If diabetes is not faced with an attitude of perseverance and defiance, often depression will prevail. Depression is the perception of life situations Continue reading >>

More in diabetes