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Can You Get Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

What's The Difference Between Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabetes affects just 5 percent of those adults, with type 2 diabetes affecting up to 95 percent. Here’s what else you need to know to be health-savvy in the age of the diabetes epidemic. What Causes Diabetes? "Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease — the body's immune system attacks the cells in the pancreas that make insulin," a hormone, says Andjela Drincic, MD, associate professor of internal medicine in the division of diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolism at the University of Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The exact cause is not known, but it's probably a combination of the genes a person is born with and something in the environment that triggers the genes to become active. "The cause of type 2 diabetes is multifactorial," says Dr. Drincic. "People inherit genes that make them susceptible to type 2, but lifestyle factors, like obesity and inactivity, are also important. In type 2 diabetes, at least in the early stages, there is enough insulin, but the body becomes resistant to it." Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include a family history of the disease, a poor diet, a sedentary lifestyle, and obesity. African-Americans, Latin Americans, and certain Native American groups have a higher risk of type 2 diabetes than Caucasian Americans. Juvenile or Adult-Onset: When Does Diabetes Start? Usually, type 1 diabetes in dia Continue reading >>

Can A Person Have Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time

Can A Person Have Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time

Can a person have both type 1 and type 2 diabetes at the same time Last Updated on Wed, 14 Mar 2018 | Diabetes Answers Generally speaking, we do not diagnose both disorders in the same individual. If people have type 1 diabetes , they are completely lacking effective circulating insulin . By definition, this is not the case in people with type 2 diabetes, so having the one disorder effectively rules out the other. However, people with type 1 diabetes may be prone to the same metabolic problems as those with type 2 diabetes. In other words, if people with type 1 diabetes gain weight, become sedentary, or are members of an ethnic group at high risk for type 2 diabetes, they may become insulin resistant and their diabetes will be more difficult to control. Higher doses of insulin will be required and they may develop the metabolic problems that tend to be associated with type 2 diabetes, such as cholesterol and related blood fat abnormalities, as well as high blood pressure . These will add to their risk of cardiovascular disease . Some people with apparent type 2 diabetes appear to have a partial form of type 1 diabetes, which has stopped short of complete destruction of their insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This is known as LADA or latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult. They tend to require insulin treatment earlier in the course of their diabetes, but are not considered to have both diseases. Can people have both typ 1 and type 2 diabeties at the same time? Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 At The Same Time?

Type 1 And Type 2 At The Same Time?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have, what I thought would be, a simple question. Apparently not! Is it possible to be Type 1 AND Type 2 Diabetic at the same time? :? I Googled that very question, expecting one simple Yes or No, only to find dozens of different answers; from the adamant "Yes" to the unquestionably certain "No". Even doctors seem to disagree, which is a bit worrying when you consider that we contact them for diabetes related issues. I've ended up totally confused (again), hence my return to the forums. You can be a Type 1 who has insulin resistance like a Type 2. I have seen Type 1 people on here who take metformin for the insulin resistance. HI. Yes, it's an interesting question. I'm sure there are people with both types but it does seem a strange combination. A T1 has little or no insulin production hence any insulin resistance won't be due to excess insulin which I understand is one of the vicious circles that results in insulin resistance (and also results in the depression of islet cells). I assume that a T1 who is overweight perhaps from having a high carb/high insulin input may develop insulin resistance? I'll be interested in posts from others who may be more knowledgeable. Yes - eh, and no......well possibly, maybe!! :? It is possible for a T1 to have visceral fat around their organs and to develop insulin resistance and therefore have both and it is referred to I believe as Double Diabetes. I would think it much more unlikely for a T2 to develop full blown T1 and all that involves although strictly speaking it could be possible, the chances of it happening though would be very low. The autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas Continue reading >>

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

5 Ways Type 1 Diabetes Is Different From Type 2

When people hear that you have diabetes, they start to make assumptions that aren't always accurate. A lot of the confusion stems from the fact that there are two main types, yet many people don't understand how they're different. (Want to pick up some healthier habits? Sign up to get daily healthy living tips delivered straight to your inbox!) As someone with type 1 diabetes—I was diagnosed with it nearly 40 years ago—I'm all too familiar with the disease. I lived with it as a child, teen, and adult, and when I decided to have kids I had to figure out how to manage the condition while being pregnant. (I even wrote a book about it, Balancing Pregnancy With Pre-Existing Diabetes: Healthy Mom, Healthy Baby.) Having type 1 diabetes means I'm in the minority: Of the approximately 29 million Americans who have diabetes, only 1.25 million have type 1. Most have type 2, which is a totally different form. "Comparing type 1 to type 2 is like comparing apples to tractors," says Gary Scheiner, a Pennsylvania-based certified diabetes educator and author of Think Like a Pancreas. "The only thing they really have in common is that both involve an inability to control blood sugar levels." Here are 5 important distinctions. 1. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease; type 2 isn't. Diabetes happens when your body has trouble with insulin, a hormone that helps convert sugar from the food you eat into energy. When there isn’t enough insulin in your body, sugar builds up in the bloodstream and can make you sick. People with type 1 and type 2 both face this problem, but how they arrived there is quite different. If you have type 1, you don't make any insulin at all. That's because type 1 is an autoimmune disease in which your immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-making cells in your Continue reading >>

Can A Person Have Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time?

Can A Person Have Both Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time?

Can a person have both type 1 and type 2 diabetes at the same time? Generally speaking, we do not diagnose both disorders in the same individual. If people have type 1 diabetes, they are completely lacking effective circulating insulin. By definition, this is not the case in people with type 2 diabetes, so having the one disorder effectively rules out the other. However, people with type 1 diabetes may be prone to the same metabolic problems as those with type 2 diabetes. In other words, if people with type 1 diabetes gain weight, become sedentary, or are members of an ethnic group at high risk for type 2 diabetes, they may become insulin resistant and their diabetes will be more difficult to control. Higher doses of insulin will be required and they may develop the metabolic problems that tend to be associated with type 2 diabetes, such as cholesterol and related blood fat abnormalities, as well as high blood pressure. These will add to their risk of cardiovascular disease. Some people with apparent type 2 diabetes appear to have a partial form of type 1 diabetes, which has stopped short of complete destruction of their insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This is known as LADA or latent autoimmune diabetes of the adult. They tend to require insulin treatment earlier in the course of their diabetes, but are not considered to have both diseases. Is there such a thing as borderline diabetes? What is it? The term borderline diabetes has now been replaced by the term prediabetes. Both terms indicate that a person has abnormalities in his or her plasma glucose levels that fall short of standard accepted definitions for frank diabetes. Table 1 shows the normal ranges for both fasting plasma glucose and for plasma glucose after a glucose load by mouth. The reason that a Continue reading >>

Is It Possible For Type 2 Diabetes To Turn Into Type 1?

Is It Possible For Type 2 Diabetes To Turn Into Type 1?

Type 2 diabetes can’t turn into type 1 diabetes, since the two conditions have different causes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. It occurs when the insulin-producing islet cells in the pancreas are completely destroyed, so the body can’t produce any insulin. In Type 2 diabetes, the islet cells are still working. However, the body is resistant to insulin. In other words, the body no longer uses insulin efficiently. Type 1 diabetes is far less common than type 2. It used to be called juvenile diabetes because the condition is typically diagnosed in early childhood. Type 2 diabetes is more commonly diagnosed in adults, though we’re now seeing more and more children being diagnosed with this disease. It’s more commonly seen in those who are overweight or obese. It’s possible for someone with type 2 diabetes to be misdiagnosed. They may have many of the symptoms of type 2 diabetes, but actually have another condition that may be more closely related to type 1 diabetes. This condition is called latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Researchers estimate that between 4 and 14 percent of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes might actually have LADA. Many physicians are still unfamiliar with the condition and will assume a person has type 2 diabetes because of their age and symptoms. In general, a misdiagnosis is possible because: both LADA and type 2 diabetes typically develop in adults the initial symptoms of LADA — such as excessive thirst, blurred vision, and high blood sugar — mimic those of type 2 diabetes doctors don’t typically run tests for LADA when diagnosing diabetes initially, the pancreas in people with LADA still produces some insulin diet, exercise, and oral drugs usually used to treat type 2 diabetes work well in people with LADA Continue reading >>

Double Diabetes

Double Diabetes

Tweet Double diabetes is when someone with type 1 diabetes develops insulin resistance, the key feature of type 2 diabetes. Someone with double diabetes will always have type 1 diabetes present but the effects of insulin resistance can be reduced somewhat. The most common reason for developing insulin resistance is obesity and whilst type 1 diabetes is not itself brought on by obesity. People with type 1 diabetes are able to become obese and suffer from insulin resistance as much as anyone else. What is the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease whereby the body’s immune system attacks and kills off its own insulin producing cells. The autoimmune effect is not prompted by being overweight. Over a period of time, the vast majority, if not all, of insulin producing cells are destroyed. Without being able to produce insulin, blood sugar levels rise and the symptoms of diabetes appear. Type 2 diabetes is closely related to obesity, 85% of cases of type 2 diabetes occur in people who are obese. Although the process is not yet fully understood, it is largely believed that obesity causes the body’s cells to become resistant to insulin. As a result, people with either type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes start to produce more insulin than those without the condition and one of the consequences of this is further weight gain which helps to reinforce the condition. Type 2 diabetes develops gradually, usually over a period of years before symptoms, such as frequent urination, become noticeable. Progression of double diabetes Similar to type 2 diabetes, double diabetes, if not treated appropriately can become more severe over time. If double diabetes is allowed to progress more insulin will need to be injected which promotes further w Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 1 Use Type 2 Drugs?

Can People With Type 1 Use Type 2 Drugs?

I've heard about people with type 1 using drugs meant for type 2 diabetes in addition to insulin. Is there a benefit to doing this? Continue reading >>

Is It Medically Possible To Have Both Types Of Diabetes At The Same Time And Why?

Is It Medically Possible To Have Both Types Of Diabetes At The Same Time And Why?

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 are quite different diseases. Diabetes type 1 is an autoimmune disorder where there is a near complete destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas that produce insulin—so all type 1 diabetics die without insulin injections because they develop ketoacidosis. Diabetes type 1 used to be called juvenile and type 2 adult onset because they seem to be into different age groups of people. Usually a patient diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is diagnosed as a child because they become admitted to the hospital in diabetic ketoacidosis. Type 2 diabetes results from insulin resistance almost always from obesity. Usually a patient is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes when they are found on routine blood test to have an elevated sugar or have symptoms of having excessive thirst, excessive urination or blurry vision. This occurs when the are beta cells (that produce insulin) are down to 50% and gradually as patients lose beta cell function they become insulin dependent when they are down to 10%. The other poster is incorrect in his understanding. Doctors frequently prescribe insulin to type 2 diabetics when the beta cell function drops so low that oral medications are no longer effective. It is not a mistake. Being a type 2 insulin-dependent diabetic does not turn you into a type 1 diabetic. There appears to some overlap between the two but they are generally completely separate diseases. Continue reading >>

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Types Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus (or diabetes) is a chronic, lifelong condition that affects your body's ability to use the energy found in food. There are three major types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. All types of diabetes mellitus have something in common. Normally, your body breaks down the sugars and carbohydrates you eat into a special sugar called glucose. Glucose fuels the cells in your body. But the cells need insulin, a hormone, in your bloodstream in order to take in the glucose and use it for energy. With diabetes mellitus, either your body doesn't make enough insulin, it can't use the insulin it does produce, or a combination of both. Since the cells can't take in the glucose, it builds up in your blood. High levels of blood glucose can damage the tiny blood vessels in your kidneys, heart, eyes, or nervous system. That's why diabetes -- especially if left untreated -- can eventually cause heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, and nerve damage to nerves in the feet. Type 1 diabetes is also called insulin-dependent diabetes. It used to be called juvenile-onset diabetes, because it often begins in childhood. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition. It's caused by the body attacking its own pancreas with antibodies. In people with type 1 diabetes, the damaged pancreas doesn't make insulin. This type of diabetes may be caused by a genetic predisposition. It could also be the result of faulty beta cells in the pancreas that normally produce insulin. A number of medical risks are associated with type 1 diabetes. Many of them stem from damage to the tiny blood vessels in your eyes (called diabetic retinopathy), nerves (diabetic neuropathy), and kidneys (diabetic nephropathy). Even more serious is the increased risk of hea Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

If your child or someone you know has been recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, you may be wondering how the disease differs from type 2 diabetes — the form people tend to know more about. What causes type 1 versus type 2 diabetes? Are the symptoms the same? And how is each treated? Here to clear up the confusion with an overview of key differences — and similarities — between these two types of diabetes are experts Julie Settles, M.S.N., A.C.N.P.-B.C., C.E.N., a clinical research scientist at Lilly Diabetes, and Rosemary Briars, N.D., P.N.P.-B.C., C.D.E., C.C.D.C., clinical director and program co-director of the Chicago Children’s Diabetes Center at La Rabida Children’s Hospital. Causes Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, as it’s formally known in medical terms, describes a group of metabolic diseases in which a person develops high blood glucose (blood sugar). The underlying health factors causing the high blood sugar will determine whether someone is diagnosed with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which “the body’s immune system starts to make antibodies that are targeted directly at the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas (islet cells),” explains Briars. Over time, the immune system “gradually destroys the islet cells, so insulin is no longer made and the person has to take insulin every day, from then on,” she says. As for why this happens, Settles notes, “The immune system normally fights off viruses and bacteria that we do not want in our body, but when it causes diabetes, it is because something has gone wrong and now the body attacks its own cells.” Triggering this autoimmune response is a complex mix of genetic and environmental factors that researchers are still trying to fully understand. O Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes At The Same Time?

One thing I hear occasionally among type 1 diabetics is, “Well, at least I can’t get type 2 diabetes!” This reasoning makes sense if you think only about the two diabetes as two points along a single spectrum, with type 2 diabetes being a metabolic disease that is “the less severe” type 1 diabetes. I felt compelled to answer: Yes, yes you can. You absolutely can. Yes you can have type 1 and type 2 diabetes at the same time. You’re unlikely to get diagnosed with type 2 diabetes if you already have type 1, because it’s hard to measure the difference in blood sugar values, but you can still suffer from both types of diabetes simultaneously. Consider: type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the T cell mediated destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells. In other words, no beta cells. Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by insulin resistance in many of the cells in the body, and can progress to stress-induced (we think) death of the beta cells. So, if your beta cells are already gone as a result of type 1 diabetes, they can’t die again because of type 2. But you can definitely become insulin resistant, due to obesity, genetic predisposition, and/or hyperinsulinemia. As if type 1 diabetes weren’t hard enough– consider doing it while your body is insulin resistant as well. Ugh. Don’t do it, people– watch your weight, stay active, eat well. Avoid type 2 diabetes, especially if you’re a type 1 diabetic. I am thinking about all of this in the wake of having watched the HBO miniseries/documentary, The Weight of the Nation. I highly recommend it– it was made in conjunction with the NIH, and hits a nice balance of being understandable and compelling, and being scientifically based. Plus, Francis Collins makes seve Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

What Do They Have in Common? Abstract Type 1 and type 2 diabetes frequently co-occur in the same families, suggesting common genetic susceptibility. Such mixed family history is associated with an intermediate phenotype of diabetes: insulin resistance and cardiovascular complications in type 1 diabetic patients and lower BMI and less cardiovascular complications as well as lower C-peptide concentrations in type 2 diabetic patients. GAD antibody positivity is more common in type 2 diabetic patients from mixed families than from common type 2 diabetes families. The mixed family history is associated with more type 1–like genetic (HLA and insulin gene) and phenotypic characteristics in type 2 diabetic patients, especially in the GAD antibody–positive subgroup. Leaving out the extreme ends of diabetes phenotypes, young children progressing rapidly to total insulin deficiency and strongly insulin-resistant subjects mostly with non-Europid ethnic origin, a large proportion of diabetic patients may have both type 1 and type 2 processes contributing to their diabetic phenotype. Diabetes in most cases is caused by a loss of the physical or functional β-cell mass, mostly due to an autoimmune process (type 1 etiological process) and/or increased need for insulin due to insulin resistance (type 2 process) (1). Both of these major diabetes types are believed to include different stages of disease, ranging from non–insulin-requiring to insulin-requiring for control or survival. According to this classification adopted by the World Health Organization, it is quite possible that both processes would operate in a single patient and contribute to the phenotype of the patient. Also, factors other than autoimmunity can lead to a defective insulin response to glucose. Both major diab Continue reading >>

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes: The Differences Between Types 1 And 2

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus (DM), is a metabolic disorder in which the body cannot properly store and use sugar. It affects the body's ability to use glucose, a type of sugar found in the blood, as fuel. This happens because the body does not produce enough insulin, or the cells do not correctly respond to insulin to use glucose as energy. Insulin is a type of hormone produced by the pancreas to regulate how blood sugar becomes energy. An imbalance of insulin or resistance to insulin causes diabetes. Diabetes is linked to a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, vision loss, neurological conditions, and damage to blood vessels and organs. There is type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. They have different causes and risk factors, and different lines of treatment. This article will compare the similarities and differences of types 1 and 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and typically resolves after childbirth. However, having gestational diabetes also increases the risk of developing type 2 diabetes after pregnancy, so patients are often screened for type 2 diabetes at a later date. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people in the United States (U.S.) have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1. For every person with type 1 diabetes, 20 will have type 2. Type 2 can be hereditary, but excess weight, a lack of exercise and an unhealthy diet increase At least a third of people in the U.S. will develop type 2 diabetes in their lifetime. Both types can lead to heart attack, stroke, nerve damage, kidney damage, and possible amputation of limbs. Causes In type 1 diabetes, the immune system mistakenly attacks the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. These cells are destro Continue reading >>

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes: What’s The Difference?

There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Both types of diabetes are chronic diseases that affect the way your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose. Glucose is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells, but to enter your cells it needs a key. Insulin is that key. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin. You can think of it as not having a key. People with type 2 diabetes don’t respond to insulin as well as they should and later in the disease often don’t make enough insulin. You can think of this as having a broken key. Both types of diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels. That increases the risk of diabetes complications. Both types of diabetes, if not controlled, share many similar symptoms, including: frequent urination feeling very thirsty and drinking a lot feeling very hungry feeling very fatigued blurry vision cuts or sores that don’t heal properly People with type 1 diabetes may also experience irritability and mood changes, and unintentionally lose weight. People with type 2 diabetes may also have numbness and tingling in their hands or feet. Although many of the symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar, they present in very different ways. Many people with type 2 diabetes won’t have symptoms for many years. Then often the symptoms of type 2 diabetes develop slowly over the course of time. Some people with type 2 diabetes have no symptoms at all and don’t discover their condition until complications develop. The symptoms of type 1 diabetes develop fast, typically over the course of several weeks. Type 1 diabetes, which was once known as juvenile diabetes, usually develops in childhood or adolescence. But it’s possible to get type 1 diabetes later in life. Type 1 and type 2 diabetes may have simi Continue reading >>

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