diabetestalk.net

Can You Get Arthritis From Diabetes?

Arthritis & Diabetes

Arthritis & Diabetes

What do diabetes and arthritis have in common? Plenty. People with diagnosed diabetes are nearly twice as likely to have arthritis, indicating a diabetes-arthritis connection. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce or use the hormone insulin sufficiently. Insulin shuttles glucose from foods into cells so it can be converted into energy. Without insulin, glucose remains in your blood (raising blood glucose levels), your cells create less energy and you feel fatigued. What starts off as a hormonal problem can evolve into joint problems, in addition to the widely known cardiovascular problems. Diabetes causes musculoskeletal changes that lead to symptoms such as joint pain and stiffness; swelling; nodules under the skin, particularly in the fingers; tight, thickened skin; trigger finger; carpal tunnel syndrome; painful shoulders; and severely affected feet. After having had diabetes for several years, joint damage – called diabetic arthropathy – can occur. Continue reading >>

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes are very different diseases. But there's a connection between them. Having one may mean you're more likely to develop the other. In fact, research shows that RA raises your risk for diabetes by about 50%. And diabetes raises your risk of having arthritis, including RA and arthritis-related issues, by about 20%. Nearly half of American adults who have diabetes also have arthritis. Experts aren't sure why these two diseases are linked. They believe that a variety of things play a role, including: RA and type 1 diabetes are both autoimmune diseases. The immune system's job is to destroy germs and other sickness-causing invaders. Sometimes, the system goes haywire and turns against the body's own healthy cells. RA attacks the joints. Type 1 diabetes targets the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that helps your body process blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed in children and young adults and makes up less than 5% of all diabetes cases. Research suggests that some people tend to have more than one autoimmune disease. This may be partly due to genetics. And scientists have identified a gene that raises the risk for both type 1 diabetes and RA. RA causes chronic inflammation. In the short run, inflammation helps the body heal. But when it's ongoing, it causes the body to stop responding to insulin the way it should. This is called insulin resistance. Over time, the condition raises the risk for type 2 diabetes. This occurs when the body doesn't make enough insulin or resists its effects. Diabetes also triggers inflammation. On the flipside, chronic inflammation from diabetes may pave the way for RA. RA is caused by genetics and environmental factors. Research suggests that inflammation may cause people w Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

How Is Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Psa?

How Is Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Psa?

Join the conversation. register now or log in An abnormal response of the immune system causing inflammation is a key characteristic of psoriatic arthritis (PsA). The increased inflammation is noticeable in the joints as pain and swelling . In addition, researchers have shown that psoriatic disease causes inflammation throughout the body . This abnormal inflammation has several negative effects on the body, including insulin resistance and dysfunction in the lining of the blood vessels, which lead to atherosclerosis (the formation of abnormal fatty masses in the arteries) and ultimately to major cardiovascular events.1 Obesity is defined as having too much body fat. It is different than being overweight, which means weighing too much and can come from muscle, fat, bone and/or water in the body. Obesity occurs over time when more calories are consumed than used. Factors that influence weight include genetic makeup, overeating, eating high-fat foods, and lack of physical activity. Obesity increases the risk of diabetes, heart disease, stroke, some cancers, and PsA.2,3 In addition to being a risk factor for PsA, obesity has demonstrated a negative effect on treatment in clinical trials, decreasing the effectiveness of TNF inhibitors. (TNF inhibitors are a biologic therapy that target tumor necrosis factor, a chemical that is active in the inflammatory response.)1,2,4 Metabolic syndrome is a term for a group of conditions that increases risk of heart disease and diabetes. The conditions that make up metabolic syndrome are: High blood glucose, or blood sugar levels High levels of triglycerides, a type of fat in the blood Low levels of HDL, the good cholesterol in the blood High levels of abdominal obesity, or too much fat around the waist 3 Metabolic syndrome is more preval Continue reading >>

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) makes you about 50 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those without the autoimmune disease. Experts aren’t exactly sure what’s behind the connection, but many say that the link may be due to the inflammation that occurs with RA. “A lot of inflammation causes insulin resistance, which increases blood sugar levels,” says Scott Zashin, MD, a rheumatologist and clinical professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. Being sedentary because of RA pain further increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. And any steroid drugs you take for RA can make it harder to control blood sugar. “When you have a lot of steroids in your body, your body makes glucose because it assumes you’re going to need it for some kind of ‘fight or flight’ response,” says Wayne Evron, MD, an endocrinologist and medical director of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Pittsburgh. “But if you’re giving them to someone to control their RA, it can make their sugars higher.” The connection between type 2 diabetes and RA isn’t yet set in stone. “The data is kind of mixed,” Dr. Zashin warns. “There have been studies published showing an association between RA and diabetes, and some that haven’t shown an association.” Type 1 diabetes, which occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the pancreas, may also be a risk for people with RA. Though it used to be called juvenile diabetes, people can develop type 1 diabetes at any age. And because type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are both autoimmune diseases, they can occur together. Dr. Evron explains that they may be prevalent in families that tend to get autoimmune diseases And researchers have recently identified a gene named PTPN22 that can increas Continue reading >>

Live Well With Diabetes And Arthritis

Live Well With Diabetes And Arthritis

If you have diabetes and arthritis, you may have wondered if they are related. The answers is,” It depends.” Whether diabetes and arthritis are related depends on your age, the type of diabetes you have, the kind of arthritis you have, your lifestyle and the medications or supplements you take. Both diabetes and arthritis are chronic diseases. As you age, your chances for having chronic diseases increases. Also as we get older, many of us tend to get heavier. This extra weight adds stress on your joints, which can lead to inflammation and eventually a form of arthritis. TYPES OF ARTHRITIS There is more than one type of diabetes and there is more than one type of arthritis. As you already know, the two main types of diabetes are type 1 and type 2. The two main types of arthritis are osteoarthritis (or degenerative) and rheumatoid arthritis. Type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are both auto-immune diseases, meaning your body fights against another part of your body. In the case of type 1 diabetes, your body destroys the cells that make insulin. With rheumatoid arthritis, your body fights the linings of your joints. Both type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are more common among younger people. Type 2 diabetes is related to aging, being overweight and being sedentary. Degenerative, or osteoarthritis, is also related to getting older and being overweight, which results in inflammation of the joints. Inflammation is the pain, redness and swelling that occurs when you have an injury or infection. Inflammation can raise blood glucose levels—leading to diabetes. MEDICATIONS The medicines you take for arthritis are used to reduce the inflammation, swelling and pain. Some of these medicines increase insulin resistance and can raise your blood glucose levels. Steroi Continue reading >>

Arthritis And Diabetes

Arthritis And Diabetes

Tweet Arthritis is the term for conditions which cause inflammation of the joints. There are more than 100 different forms of arthritis, with a broad range of causes. Some of these forms of arthritis have close associations with certain types of diabetes. Arthritis can usually be treated to help reduce symptoms and slow progression of the condition. How common is arthritis? Arthritis is common, with an estimated 10 million people living with the condition in the UK alone. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis, affecting around 8 million in the UK. Whilst arthritis is most commonly associated with the elderly, a number of forms or arthritis can affect people of any age, including children. Types of arthritis Whilst there are many dozen forms or causes of arthritis, the following are some of the more common forms: Osteoarthritis - caused by damage to the cartilage in the joints Rheumatoid arthritis - an autoimmune form of arthritis Gout - caused by a build up of uric acid Ankylosing spondylitis - a form which usually causes stiffness in the spine Reactive arthritis - can result from certain infections causing red swollen joints Secondary arthritis - may occur following joint injury Juvenile arthritis - forms of arthritis that affect children Arthritis and diabetes Certain forms of arthritis may be more common in people with certain types of diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes have higher risks of developing osteoarthritis and gout, which is likely on account of the fact that obesity increases the risk of type 2 diabetes as well as these forms of arthritis. People with type 1 diabetes have significantly higher risks of also having rheumatoid arthritis. Both conditions are autoimmune diseases and research suggests that certain genes may increase the risk of Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Arthritis: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes And Arthritis: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes mellitus (also known as ‘sugar’ diabetes) interferes with the body’s ability to use sugar. It is a long-term condition requiring treatment by diet, pills and often injections of insulin. Generally doctors recognise two types of diabetes. Type I typically occurs in younger people and often requires treatment with insulin. Type 2 occurs in older overweight people and is treated with tablets but there can be a lot of overlap between the two types. There is often a family history of diabetes in both. Early symptoms of diabetes include thirst and passing a lot of urine, and some people lose a lot of weight. The problems with handling sugar, and specifically high blood sugar levels, can eventually lead to complications in the blood vessels, kidneys, eyes, and the nerves to the hands and feet. These complications can be delayed and minimised by controlling the blood sugar with treatment. People with diabetes are also prone to a number of musculoskeletal complications but the relationship between these complications and the diabetic control is not clear. Many of these problems are not unique to diabetes but occur more frequently in this condition. This short article describes the complications and offers advice on treatment and prevention. Shoulder problems Shoulder pain is probably the most common musculoskeletal disorder which I see associated with diabetes. Specifically the shoulder becomes stiff and painful due to inflammation and thickening of the tissue surrounding the shoulder joint – sometimes known as frozen shoulder. The pain may start following a minor injury or just come out of the blue. Typically the pain builds up to a constant nagging pain which limits the movement of the joint and causes sleep disturbance. The pain is worse in the first 3 months Continue reading >>

Inflammatory Arthritis And Diabetes: Managing Both

Inflammatory Arthritis And Diabetes: Managing Both

Inflammation is one link between arthritis and diabetes, but there are other factors involved. Almost half (47%) of adults with arthritis also have another chronic condition. Of the 52.5 million US adults with arthritis, 16% (7.3 million) have type 2 diabetes, and 47% of adults with diabetes have arthritis. Is there a connection? Does having one condition lead to the other? Inflammatory Arthritis Inflammatory arthritis is a general term used for a group of autoimmune diseases in which the immune system attacks a person’s own tissues – the joints but also other organs throughout the body. The resulting joint symptoms include inflammation, pain, stiffness and swelling. The most common forms of inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) – affecting approximately 4 million people in the US. Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is also an autoimmune condition that causes the body to not produce, use, or metabolize the hormone insulin sufficiently. In a healthy person, insulin is produced in the pancreas and helps the body convert sugars to energy. A person with type 1 diabetes does not produce insulin because their immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas; although the reason why this occurs is unknown, genes and possibly viral infections are thought to be responsible. It is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes begins with insulin resistance, in which the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce sufficient amounts of insulin. Technically considered a metabolic disorder, this type of diabetes is associated with older age, obesity, family history and other factors. In adults, nearly all diagnosed cases are type 2 diabetes. The Relationship Betw Continue reading >>

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Can High Blood Sugar Cause Joint Pain?

Joint pain is an annoying symptom felt by millions of people around the world each day. Sitting for too long, obesity, Arthritis, repetitive stress are all factors that are pointed out as the most common causes of joint pain in either the hip or the knee or the back. But did you ever think that your high blood sugar can be a significant factor for your joint pain? According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of the Arthritis patients are suffering from Diabetes at the same time. We cannot deny the obvious link between these two conditions, can we? It is clear as a day that diabetes is actually worsening the arthritis symptoms and adds up to the joint pain that you are already feeling. So if you are suffering from Diabetes and Arthritis at the same time, or if you are just dealing with Diabetes, please do follow us through to find out how exactly are these two conditions associated and how you can act to reduce your joint pain. Is Your High Blood Sugar The Reason That Causes Your Joint Pain? It is no secret that Diabetes Mellitus causes various health problems regarding all of the body’s systems. However, what may surprise a lot of people is finding out that Diabetes can actually worsen their joint pain or even cause one if not present before. One study published in the Acta Medica Scandinavica talked about a diagnosis known as the Diabetic shoulder. Diabetic shoulder, also known as frozen shoulder, is a condition in which the capsule of the shoulder joint becomes swollen and thickened causing decreased mobility, pain, and persistent stiffness to occur. It is not that Diabetes is the only cause for this condition, however, within patients suffering from Diabetes, the symptoms of the frozen shoulder are much more severe and harder to treat. Ano Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Arthritis: Is It A Risk Factor Or Comorbidity?

Diabetes Mellitus And Arthritis: Is It A Risk Factor Or Comorbidity?

Go to: Abstract Investigators have explored the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis for a long time; however, there are uncertainties and inconsistencies among various studies. In this study, we tried to explore the relationship between diabetes mellitus and the overall risk of arthritis, as well as the potential modifiers for this relationship. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive literature search through PubMed and identified 36 eligible studies. The overall analyses, subgroup analyses, as well as sensitivity analyses, were conducted to illustrate the association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis. Study quality was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. All statistical analyses were conducted using STATA SE version 13.0. In our study, 36 eligible studies were identified and involved in the meta-analysis. The overall association between diabetes mellitus and arthritis is 1.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14–2.28, P = .007). The association exists only in nongouty arthritis, where we observed the estimated odds ratio (OR) 1.33 (95% CI: 1.05–1.67, P < .001). The opposite point estimates from different types of diabetes may indicate possible different associations for type I (OR: 0.98, 95% CI: 0.18–5.39, P = .985) or type II diabetes (OR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.88–1.84, P = .194). Diabetes mellitus performs more likely as a comorbidity of arthritis rather than a risk factor; however, more studies will be helpful to increase the confidence of identifying the association between diabetes and arthritis. Keywords: arthritis, comorbidity, diabetes mellitus, risk factor, meta-analysis Click on the image to see a larger version. Continue reading >>

Existing Arthritis Drug Might Help Fight Diabetes

Existing Arthritis Drug Might Help Fight Diabetes

Existing arthritis drug might help fight diabetes The growing concern of type 2 diabetes needs no introduction so, identifying a drug that is already in circulation that might help to fight the condition would be a welcome discovery. Finding improved treatments for diabetes is a pressing issue. Type 2 diabetes is rarely out of the headlines and for good reason. Approximately 30.3 million people in the United States have diabetes , the vast majority of whom have type 2 diabetes. This equates to about 1 in 10 U.S. citizens. Some states are hit harder than others. In Mississipi, for instance, almost 1 in 7 residents have a diabetes diagnosis. When you consider that about 1 in 4 people with diabetes do not yet know that they have it, the figures are nothing short of staggering. It's all the more worrying when you remember that, although type 2 diabetes can be successfully managed in many cases, it is a condition that many will have for life. As such, diabetes is a huge burden on a person physically, mentally, and financially. Because of the huge numbers involved and the significant suffering that it can bring, research into innovative treatments for type 2 diabetes is constantly rolling on. In brief, type 2 diabetes is caused by lifestyle factors such as inactivity, poor diet, and obesity . It is a metabolic disorder that causes cells to stop responding to insulin . This has the effect of raising the level of sugar in the blood, which, in turn, damages the organs and systems of the body. Alongside lifestyle interventions, many people with diabetes take medication to help keep their blood sugar levels in check. Although these can be useful, some have adverse side effects and others become less effective as they are used for longer periods of time. Researchers are keen, ther Continue reading >>

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

What's Causing Your Joint And Nerve Pain?

It’s natural to feel a little discomfort in your hands, fingers, feet, and ankles from time to time. Joint pain is a part of getting older and can have a number of causes. But that ache in your foot or arm could also be a problem with a nerve caused by your diabetes. And that’s an issue that could be serious and require quick attention. So how do you tell the difference? It’s the leading cause of disability in the U.S. It affects more than 50 million adults. Often referred to as arthritis, it’s broadly defined as discomfort where two or more bones meet. Though often mild, sometimes sporadic, and rarely an emergency, the pain can be severe, making it hard to move the joint. If you have it, you’ll probably notice changes to your joint like: Stiffness Less range in motion Swelling Redness Tenderness or warmth A tougher time using it A difference in shape The causes of joint pain vary greatly. It could be: Muscle strains or sprains A broken or dislocated bone Gout Hypothyroidism Leukemia Lupus Osteoarthritis Rickets Lyme disease Rheumatoid arthritis Your doctor might call it diabetic neuropathy. It’s pain in your nerves, not in your bones. It happens when high blood sugar harms the nerve fibers. You can get it anywhere in your body, but it most often affects your legs and feet. Anywhere from 60%-70% of people with diabetes have some sort of neuropathy. Most get it after having the disease for 10 years or more. There are many types. But the two most likely to cause problems with your joints are peripheral and autonomic neuropathy. This is the most common form of diabetic joint pain. It affects your legs, arms, hands, feet, fingers, and toes. With ongoing diabetes, joints can no longer respond like they should to the strain and stress placed on them. As a result, Continue reading >>

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

When you hear the word “arthritis,” you probably think of joint pain, swelling and stiffness. But rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease that causes inflammation in your joints, can affect the rest of your body, too—sometimes in surprising ways. For example, studies have shown that people with RA are more likely to also have diabetes, a condition characterized by high blood sugar levels. From Joint Pain to Blood Sugar Woes It turns out that inflammation, which is a key feature of RA, may cause a buildup of sugar in the blood. Luckily, there’s a silver lining to the relationship between RA and blood sugar: Certain things that help manage your RA, like some lifestyle choices and medications, may also help prevent or control diabetes. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance So, how can inflammation lead to high blood sugar? The answer has to do with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps a person’s cells absorb sugar from the blood so it can be used for energy. If the cells are unable to use insulin effectively, a condition known as insulin resistance, excess sugar can start to build up in the blood. Eventually, the person may develop type 2 diabetes. Remember that RA can cause widespread inflammation throughout the body. This inflammation, in turn, may increase the body’s risk of developing insulin resistance. Researchers are still studying exactly how inflammation contributes to insulin resistance. Two likely culprits are tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), proteins that are involved in joint inflammation. There’s evidence that both TNF and IL-6 may interfere with insulin’s ability to work properly. Tips to Help Manage Both Conditions Having RA doesn’t automatically mean you’ll develop insulin resistance or diabetes. But your risk is inc Continue reading >>

14 Ways To Reduce Joint Pain With Diabetes

14 Ways To Reduce Joint Pain With Diabetes

Diabetes can damage joints, making life and movement much harder. How does this happen, and what can we do about it? A lot. “Without properly functioning joints, our bodies would be unable to bend, flex, or even move,” says Sheri Colberg, PhD, author of The Diabetic Athlete, The 7 Step Diabetes Fitness Plan, and other books. Joint pain is often called “arthritis.” “A joint is wherever two bones come together,” Colberg writes. The bones are held in place by ligaments, which attach bones to each other, and by tendons, which attach bones to the muscles that move them. The ends of the bones are padded with cartilage, a whitish gel made from collagen, proteins, fiber, and water. Cartilage allows bones to move on each other without being damaged. Joint cartilage can be damaged by injuries or by wear and tear with hard use. “Aging alone can lead to some loss of [the] cartilage layer in knee, hip, and other joints,” says Colberg “but having diabetes potentially speeds up damage to joint surfaces.” Sometimes extra glucose sticks to the surfaces of joints, gumming up their movement. This stickiness interferes with movement and leads to wear-and-tear injury. High glucose levels also thicken and degrade the collagen itself. This is bad because tendons and ligaments are also largely made from collagen. Reduced flexibility of joints leads to stiffness, greater risk of physical injury, and falls. People with joint damage may reduce their physical activity due to discomfort and fear of falling. Reduced activity promotes heart disease and insulin resistance. Here are 14 things we can do to prevent and treat joint problems and to keep moving. • Stretching keeps muscles and tendons relaxed and aligned so they’ll move as needed. You might want to ask a physical ther Continue reading >>

More in diabetes