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Can You Get A Cdl If You Have Diabetes?

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Truck drivers often work long hours, travel great distances and are responsible for the safe operation of large trucks. Long haul truck drivers have more than twice the risk of diabetes due to high stress and unhealthy food options. A study published in 2010 stated “”88% of truck drivers suffered from at least one risk factor including smoking, hypertension or obesity. There is a rate of 28% in long haul truck drivers at risk for sleep apnea, a condition which limits proper sleep”. Because of these problems, truck drivers may have been targeted about their health and driving. Recently there has been a lot of confusion about truckers with diabetes obtaining a CDL license. Learn more about the rules for truckers with diabetes. Years ago, there was a ban that prevented truck drivers with diabetes who used insulin from driving commercial vehicles for interstate operation. In 2003, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) introduced the Diabetes Exemption Program. This permitted people with insulin treated diabetes to drive a commercial vehicle in interstate commerce; however, you needed three years of previous commercial driving experience to qualify. By 2005, this was changed. Even if you are on insulin, there is no need to show previous commercial driving experience. While the new law alleviated the need to have previous driving experience for individuals with diabetes who take insulin, there are 57 provisions, guidelines and screenings to pass in order to get a CDL. Applicants must also watch state requirements related to obtaining a commercial driver license. Drivers with insulin treated diabetes must show they have control of the condition while on insulin. Those with type 1 diabetes must be on insulin for a minimum of 2 months before they can appl Continue reading >>

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

In this article we will explore what it takes to get a commercial driver’s license with diabetes, and how to get an insulin waiver for Type 1 and Type 2 persons who use insulin. We will look at requirements for Type 1 vs. Type 2 diabetes. We will look at insulin vs. non-insulin users. We will look at state vs. interstate CDL requirements. We will also look at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) diabetes waiver program, and how you can be evaluated to drive a commercial vehicle across state lines when you have diabetes and use insulin. Intrastate guidelines for CDL with diabetes If you want to work in the trucking industry only within your state, and you do not plan to cross any state lines, you can get approved to drive a commercial vehicle in your state. For drivers driving within state lines, you do not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Likewise, you would not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption if you do not use insulin. Whatever rules and regulations your state has for holding a CDL with diabetes is what you have to follow for intrastate or interstate trucking. It is important to know that most commercial driving will be considered interstate, not intrastate driving, even if you do not cross state lines. If you are carrying cargo or passengers to or from another state, this is also considered as interstate commercial driving. For information on intrastate commercial driving, check with your home state for CDL requirements and see if they are applicable to you. They vary from state to state, with each state having its own regulations. You can look up the laws governing your state by visiting this page at the American Diabetes Association website, You can type your home state in the search for laws and requirements fo Continue reading >>

Dot Physical In Texas - Diabetes Exemption

Dot Physical In Texas - Diabetes Exemption

DOT Physical in Texas - Diabetes Exemption I'm interested in getting my interstate Class A CDL and I'm having a hard time finding a DOT medical examiner in the greater Houston area familiar with the FMCSA Federal Diabetes Exemption Program. I'm a Type 1 - insulin dependent diabetic and in the process of applying for the diabetes exemption. I'm looking to change careers and live out a dream of becoming a truck driver. I'm in a fortunate situation of already having a job offer (including training) as long as I can obtain my CDL. I've been calling around to physicians and DOT medical examiners listed on the internet but to date each one that I've spoken with has said they are not familiar with the federal diabetes exemption program and didn't think I could qualify for my CDL. It's becoming really frustrating trying to find someone who's familiar with it so I don't have to hassle trying to educate them. Anyone had to deal with the same issue, and if so, can you provide some advice? Especially if you know of anyone in the greater Houston area... Thanks in advance for any information you can provide! Don't hold me to it Zinger, but I think in January they are doing away with the type 1 disqualification. They are going to treat it just like type 2 as long as you have it controlled, you'll be okay. I know I read about it back in the summer. I haven't seen anything recently on it. But yes, go ahead and get the waiver going. It takes a little while. With it, you won't get disqualified. It's hard to eat well on the road. Try to find a company that has APU's on their trucks so you can do your own cooking. I've got a call into FMCSA and will certainly ask the question regarding timeline on doing away with the disqualification. I too had read something about that but vaguely remembe Continue reading >>

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Certain truck drivers who suffer from diabetes will be allowed to operate commercial motor vehicles in spite of their health conditions, federal regulators said Tuesday. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is exempting dozens of truck drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes from rules that would otherwise prohibit them from operating a truck. "FMCSA evaluated the eligibility of the drivers and determined that granting the exemptions to these individuals would achieve a level of safety equivalent to or greater than the level that would be achieved by complying with the current regulation," the agency wrote in the Federal Register. The rules are intended to prevent truck drivers from endangering other drivers on the road. Federal regulators have begun cracking down on truckers who violate these and other safety regulations, particularly in the wake of the crash that nearly killed comedian Tracy Morgan. The FMCSA said Tuesday that these 72 drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes have it reasonably under control and do not pose any additional danger to other drivers on the road. They will receive a two-year exemption from the rules. The FMCSA is not exempting all drivers who use insulin from the rules, however — only those that it believes do not pose a risk on the roads. Furthermore, truck drivers that no longer need insulin to treat their diabetes are also exempt from the rules. Continue reading >>

Why The A1c Test For Drivers?

Why The A1c Test For Drivers?

Understanding your blood sugar level is important for your CDL and your long-term health Land Line contributor Suppose a driver goes in for a DOT exam and his/her urine specimen indicates sugar “spilling” on the routine test. What does this mean? The normal kidney can hold up to a 300 mg percent rise in blood sugar without spilling sugar into the urine. If sugar is detected in that urine specimen, here’s what happens next. Usually, a medical examiner will order a “finger stick” to determine the blood sugar level. If the test comes back with a reading of 160 mg percent or higher, then the driver is diagnosed with new onset diabetes mellitus or uncontrolled diabetes that needs better treatment. Such a diagnosis can lead to loss of a professional driver’s DOT medical card or a three-month medical card. The driver must see his doctor – if he has one – and be treated or have his medication adjusted. Then the driver must demonstrate to the DOT examiner (soon to be “certified medical examiner”) that his blood sugar is being treated. It must also be demonstrated that the driver is compliant with follow-up and is taking medication for his disease. Here is where the A1C test is going to be a life-changer for professional drivers. The number that most of us DOT medical examiners look for is an average blood sugar of 160 or less. But how do we find the average blood sugar when we have only three months to demonstrate compliance? The answer is a test called “hemoglobin A1C.” This test measures the glucose found in the red blood cells. It just so happens that the human red blood cell lives for 120 days, so we can measure the sugar in it. DOT medical examiners now have either instant A1C in office test or, at worst, a two- to three-day send-out test. The good n Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Diabetes In Trucking: Three Things You Need To Know

Tom Milam, CEO of health care provider TrueLifeCare, will tell you that there are three things motor carriers and their drivers need to know about diabetes and how it impacts the trucking industry: There's a 50% higher occurrence of diabetes in truck drivers than the national average; Drivers with diabetes can apply for a medical waiver with the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) to allow them to operate a commercial vehicle, as long as they meet its specific criteria; Yet while the use of insulin is no longer a complete barrier to being able to operate a commercial vehicle on the road, a driver must be able to prove they are maintaining stable blood sugars; not an easy task. “Managing diabetes on one's own is a daunting task. Add to that the high mobility of truck drivers and it's nearly impossible,” Milam explained to Fleet Owner. “That’s where companies like ours come into play; developing diabetes management programs for employers who have high incidences of diabetes in their workforce,” he added. “We coach drivers – via telephone – about ways to manage their disease and stabilize blood sugars in order to keep them healthy and on the road.” Milam said there are two key facts fleets need to keep in mind diabetes: First, that there is no cure and, second, diabetes is progressive, meaning that as symptoms worsen, the disease causes more harm to your body, especially without attentive personal management. “The most immediate impact for drivers with diabetes is losing their jobs,” he stressed. “Truck drivers can lose their ability to drive if they require insulin to manage their disease, an almost automatic ‘do not certify’ condition,” Milam said. “Today, nearly 20% of all people with diabetes use insulin therapy. While dr Continue reading >>

Commercial Driver's Licenses-applicants With Diabetes

Commercial Driver's Licenses-applicants With Diabetes

Topic: DISEASES; AUTOMOBILE SAFETY STANDARDS; DRIVER LICENSES; DRIVER EDUCATION; Location: MOTOR VEHICLES - LICENSES; October 28, 2005 2005-R-0805 COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSES-APPLICANTS WITH DIABETES By: George Coppolo, Chief Attorney You asked if there is any new legislation about commercial driver's licenses (CDL) for people with diabetes. SUMMARY State law requires anyone driving a “commercial motor vehicle” in Connecticut to hold a CDL issued by Connecticut or some other state, with applicable endorsements valid for the vehicle he is driving (CGS § 14-44a). The CDL law defines a “commercial motor vehicle” as any vehicle (1) with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more; (2) designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver; (3) designed to transport 11 or more passengers, including the driver, and used to transport students under age 21 to and from school; or (4) transporting hazardous materials and required to have warning placards under federal hazardous materials transportation regulations (CGS § 14-1(a)(13)). Thus, some vehicles are commercial in nature, such as a truck with a gross weight rating of less than 26,000 pounds, but do not require the operator to have a CDL. The law exempts the following from CDL requirements: vehicles used for farming purposes within 150 miles of the farm, fire fighting apparatus, authorized emergency vehicles, recreational vehicles, and military vehicles operated by military personnel. Connecticut's laws on CDLs generally reflect the requirements of federal law. The federal Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established a program under which state-issued licenses for drivers of commercial motor vehicles have to meet minimum national standards. State law prohibits the motor vehicles Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Dot Medical Waivers

Type 1 Diabetes And Dot Medical Waivers

I thought I would tap the hive mind on here to give me some advice/information on obtaining a Class A CDL license with insulin dependent Type 1 diabetes. I did a search on here but it looks like the thread I found was over 2 years old and I didn't want to look at old/changed info. I did a search online and saw that there is a waiver that can be obtained and that an insulin dependent Type 1 diabetic cannot be outright disqualified as a driver anymore. I'm hoping that at some point my husband will take an interest in driving and eventually want to team with me, but he's insulin dependent. It's well controlled, and it's been over 20 years since he was hospitalized for anything related to his diabetes. He has no peripheral vascular disease (yet), no eye problems, and really no other problems other than taking a long acting insulin before bed and fast acting insulin before each meal. He checks his blood sugars regularly, and when he feels he's getting low a quick glass of orange juice usually does the trick. I was just wondering if the medical waivers are difficult to obtain, and if anyone on here has had to obtain the same waivers and what it was like and what it is that we might need to keep in mind. Now that I've started CDL school he's actually seemed more interested in the idea, and I would like to encourage him as much as I can. A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles: Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds. Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds. Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or Continue reading >>

Arizona Intrastate Diabetes Waiver Program

Arizona Intrastate Diabetes Waiver Program

Dear Applicant: Thank you for your interest in the Arizona Intrastate Diabetes Waiver Program. The information in this letter and the accompany materials need to be read carefully. The applicant is responsible for providing all required information. The following information required to be submitted: 1. Applicant Information Checklist; 2. Signed copy of the Medical Examination Report (completed by the Medical Examiner); 3. Signed copy of the Medical Examiner’s Certificate (completed by the Medical Examiner); 4. Endocrinologist Evaluation Checklist; 5. Vision Evaluation Checklist; How does the applicant apply for a waiver from the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) diabetes standard? A. Medical Examiner The applicant must be examined by a medical examiner, as defined in 49 CFR 390.5. The examiner can be a physician, (MD, DO), advanced nurse practitioner, physician assistant, or chiropractor if allowed by their state regulations to certify drivers. This examination STARTS the waiver process. The applicant MUST take the Certifying Medical Examiner Evaluation letter to the appointment with the medical examiner for him/her to review prior to performing the examination. In addition, the applicant must bring a copy of his/her 5 year medical history to the examination for the medical examiner to review. The medical examiner will have copies of the Arizona Department of Transportation Medical Examination Report Form and the Medical Examiner’s Certificate. The applicant must meet all medical standards and guidelines, other than diabetes, in accordance with Arizona Administrative Code (AAC) R 17-5-208 and 49 CFR 391.41 (b) (1-13). Other than the use of insulin to treat their diabetes, any other medical problem or condition that prevents the applicant from be Continue reading >>

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

Have diabetes and want to pursue a CDL? While you will have to take some extra steps, it is totally possible and will be worth the effort if this is the career path you are passionate about. Some History First Prior to 2005, people with diabetes taking insulin were not able to become truck drivers. Thanks to a 2005 transportation bill, however, things have since changed. Now a person with Type 1 Diabetes who takes insulin is able to drive in interstate commerce. Although there are numerous requirements that the individual must meet, it is now possible for those with diabetes to become CDL drivers. What is Necessary to Obtain a CDL if You Have Diabetes Those with Type 2 diabetes that do not take insulin only need to follow their state guidelines related to obtaining and keeping a CDL. They will not need to file a Federal Diabetes Exemption and can still cross state lines; however, if you find out that you are going to be on insulin, you will have to file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Those with Type 1 Diabetes can get a CDL but will need to meet certain medical criteria and file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. To begin, applicants for the Federal Diabetes Exemption with Type 1 diabetes will need to have been taking their insulin for at least 2 months prior to applying for the exemption. Applicants with Type 2 diabetes must have been taking their insulin for one month. You will need to have a health evaluation performed by a physician that is listed as a “medical examiner” on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) National Registry. Other evaluations may include tests conducted by an endocrinologist, ophthalmologist, or optometrist. There is also a list of medical criteria which must be met, including: • You must not have had had one o Continue reading >>

Getting A Cdl While Having Diabetes... Can Anyone Help?

Getting A Cdl While Having Diabetes... Can Anyone Help?

getting a CDL while having diabetes... can anyone help? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. getting a CDL while having diabetes... can anyone help? My boyfriend has diabetes and is trying to get his CDL lisence but they say it will take him four months to process his medical records. Is this the only way of going about this? Does anyone have any information on this issue? My boyfriend has diabetes and is trying to get his CDL lisence but they say it will take him four months to process his medical records. Is this the only way of going about this? Does anyone have any information on this issue? what's a CDL license? California Drivers License? I didn't even think people with diabetes could get a CDL, but upon researching, it looks like you can get one but you have to apply for a "federal diabetes exemption". Commercial Drivers' Licenses - American Diabetes Association My boyfriend has diabetes and is trying to get his CDL lisence but they say it will take him four months to process his medical records. Is this the only way of going about this? Does anyone have any information on this issue? I am not sure why a diabetic would have any problems getting a flat screen, however, you will find it's quite the upgrade from an old clunky CRT monitor. There are lots of rules for a CDL. He could have major issues but you also do not say if he is a type 1 or 2? On Insulin? I have a friend who just lost his CDL and is going on disability even thought he is a type 2. Then there is finding a job that will hire him they may not say that is why but there liability issues are huge. I wish you the best of luck! One other thing to consider - is he Continue reading >>

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) adapted medical guidelines that diabetic truck drivers must meet. They are part of the requirements for obtaining an interstate Commercial Driver’s License (CDL). At one point in time, a truck driver with diabetes had to prove they have had diabetic episodes for three years to qualify for the diabetic exemption program. Since the diabetic exemption program was revised, this qualification no longer applies. Read below to find out what the new DOT regulations mean for prospective truck drivers with diabetes. Changing DOT regulations for diabetic truck drivers The first diabetic exemption program was established in 2003. It contained a long list of stipulations that made it hard for diabetic truck drivers to qualify for their CDL. This kept many capable truck drivers from employment with interstate trucking companies. One of the main DOT regulations hindering diabetic drivers from qualifying for the exemption program was the three-year rule. The three-year rule stated truck drivers with diabetes must have a record of driving for three years without a diabetic episode, and must have been on insulin for that time. It prevented nearly all potential drivers with diabetes from meeting the old DOT regulations. Between 2003 and 2005, only four exemptions were granted to diabetic truck drivers. On November 8, 2005, the FMCSA overturned some of the rules stated in the 2003 diabetic exemption program. The agency made vital changes, opening the road to more diabetic truck drivers. The FMCSA started accepting applications for the revised diabetic exemption program on September 22, 2005. Implementing changes in the DOT program for diabetic truck drivers The 2005 DOT regulations for the Continue reading >>

T1 Diabetes And Dot | Truckersreport.com Trucking Forum | #1 Cdl Truck Driver Message Board

T1 Diabetes And Dot | Truckersreport.com Trucking Forum | #1 Cdl Truck Driver Message Board

Last year I started working for a company and part of the job would include on occasion driving a small truck (the size of a uhaul). The company asked that I obtain a DOT medical card because apparently in Massachusetts you need a medical card to drive the truck. I was told at the physical I could not obtain the medical card because i was type 1 insulin dependent. I didnt think it was a huge issue but turns out i am no longer promotable within the company because i cannot drive. I was recently transfered to Vermont where I was told because I was based out of Vermont I would not need a DOT medical card, just a certification. However, now the companies DOT compliance dept is fighting that. Do I need a DOT medical card to drive a truck the size of a uhaul, and does this make a difference between Vermont and Mass and if the company chooses to be DOT compliant even though from my understanding there not required to because of the gross weight of the truck? If it turns out I do what is the liklihood of me passing a dot physical regardless if i chose to omit be a diabetic on the pre medical report. My diabetes is in great shape and last a1c check was 5.1 and they couldnt tell from the urine because i can put my BG right on point. Other then lying do I have any legal options to obtain a dot medical card? Like I said i have no real interest in driving and i probably rarely will its just the fact that I cant get a DOT that has put me on a company #### list, I just need off the list to have a chance at promotion. Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport. The requirement for a medical card is a commercial motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,001 lbs. It is a federal law. The state laws are only Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetics And Cdl

Type 1 Diabetics And Cdl

First of all, I apologize if I'm posting in the wrong place here but I have a question regarding being an insulin dependant diabetic. I keep getting conflicting answers. I am an insulin dependant type 1 diabetic and have been told that I can never get a CDL by some people and I have also been told that I can get it with an exemption. I live in Canada but want to do long haul to the US. Any help would be greatly appreciated. This has been a long time dream but had to wait for the kids to grow up. I need all the info possible because I will do what ever I can to make this happen. If it's true I can't drive tractor than I would be willing to drive a smaller truck as long as long haul is possible. Again any help would be greatly appreciated. I was on hold for over an hour today with MTO trying to find out from them but nobody answered, go figure. ok. FMCSR 391.41(a)(1)(i) states a Canadian CMV driver is considered by virtue of having the license to have passed a medical exam and is not required to carry a medical examiner's certificate. However, Canadian drivers who do not meet the medical fitness provisions of the Canadian National Safety Code for Motor Carrier, but are issued a waiver by a Province are not qualified to drive a CMV in the US. Has no established medical history or clinical diagnosis of diabetes mellitus currently requiring insulin for control; It appears to me that if you can get it past MTO and acquire your all-Canada CDL, you will not be questioned here. But if you have to get a waiver that applies only to the Provinces willing to issue said waiver, you may not drive a commercial vehicle here. Keep trying with MTO. If they have an office in your area, camp out in their lobby until someone acknowledges you. They'll either have to deal with your question o Continue reading >>

**must Read** Diabetes And The Dot Physical

**must Read** Diabetes And The Dot Physical

**MUST READ** Diabetes and the DOT physical I think what some of us are missing is that it takes more to treat diabetes than pills. It also takes LIFELONG proper diet and exercise. So even though we manage to get our physicals approved the companies have to fire us when we fail to demonstrate proper knowledge and control of our blood sugar. The federal DOT exemption is for proper lifelong management WITH INSULIN so typically it's not appropriate... I have had a tough road; I take jentadueto and metformin and have high blood pressure and cholesterol. Monitoring is expensive and the medications and doctors visits can be also... Trucking schools and companies "fool you" and "screw you" because they need to keep you "in the dark" to keep your health and physical STUDY accurate and also to keep you from running away from the job. This is a frustrating road... believe me I KNOW!!! Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport. I take pills to control my sugar I've also lost weight so its not nearly as high, but I've never had a company check my sugar levels, as long as I pass my physical that's all that matters and as long as I only take pills and control my diabetes with diet and exersise I'm good I see my dr 2x a year, I take metformin, I get a 1 year card....... simple I'm curious, what is the highest A1C any of you have had and still passed a DOT physical. My last one was 8.3% and I'm guessing my next one will come in just under 8% with my physical due at end of August. well heres one for you....hubby was diagnosed back in 09 with diabetes.....was put on several types of meds last dec (2012) his sugar started dropping too low...so he stopped taking his meds... went again in april 5.5.....his new doctor (not the one who orig diagnosed him), told him sh Continue reading >>

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