diabetestalk.net

Can You Eat Yogurt If Your Diabetic?

Diabetes Diet: What You Should And Shouldn’t Eat

Diabetes Diet: What You Should And Shouldn’t Eat

Non-starchy vegetables should play a major role in a diabetes diet. Keep dark green leafy vegetables (including romaine lettuce, spinach, kale, and arugula) on hand. Asparagus, broccoli, cucumbers, peppers, and salad greens should also be regularly on the menu. What can diabetics eat? That’s a natural question that people with diabetes may ask their doctors. With so many choices available to you, it’s only natural to wonder about which foods to avoid with diabetes. But a diabetes diet isn’t only about which, if any, types of foods are off limits. It’s also about focusing on moderate consumption of healthful foods and getting the most nutritional value out of your dietary choices. In that sense, a diabetes diet is beneficial for just about anyone. Here’s some general advice about how to get the most nutrition out of your food and beverage choices while minimizing any adverse effects on your blood sugar. How to Make Your Carbs Count Managing carbohydrate intake is one of the cornerstones of diabetes management. Simple carbohydrates, or sugars, are broken down rapidly to be used as energy. Compared to simple carbs, complex carbohydrates contain more fiber and other nutrients and are digested more slowly. Your body needs carbohydrates as a primary energy source, but it’s important to choose them wisely. Complex carbohydrates and naturally occurring sugars (such as those found in fruits) should constitute the majority of your carbohydrate intake. So, consider these tips to guide you in making carb-smart selections as part of your diabetes diet: Eat a variety of fresh vegetables, frozen vegetables not packaged in sauce, or low-sodium/sodium-free canned vegetables. In particular, focus on non-starchy vegetables, which are generally low in calories and carbohydrates Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid On An Empty Stomach

Foods To Avoid On An Empty Stomach

Starving? Believe it or not, consuming the wrong foods on an empty stomach can make matters worse, like give your heartburn, indigestion and more. So, in order to help you decide what to avoid (at all costs) and what to opt for instead on an empty stomach, keep scrolling. AVOID Yogurt While some yogurts are packed with protein, they’re also packed with lactic acid bacteria. Consuming yogurt for breakfast (or any other time you have an empty stomach) can make the benefits of this bacteria ineffective. Foods Containing Yeast Foods like danishes and croissants – common on a continental breakfast menu – irritate the lining of the stomach and can create gas. Processed Sugar While we’re all aware that too much sugar is bad juju for the body, processed foods containing high fructose corn syrup and artificial sweeteners can lead to liver damage. Sweets also boost insulin levels, in turn, increasing the load on the pancreas – a risk that may lead to diabetes. So, say bye, bye to those breakfast donuts! Coffee Drinking coffee (or tea) on an empty stomach increases acidity, which can cause heartburn and indigestion throughout the day. Spicy Food Spices can cause damage to the gastric mucosa, increasing acid production in your tummy. This can lead to common disorders of the digestive system. Opt For Fresh Fruit Fruit is packed with vitamins, nutrients, fiber and water. Incorporating fruit into your diet, the proper way, reaps powerful benefits including improved digestion, loads of physical energy, boosts weight loss and so much more. Eaten on an empty stomach can aid in detoxing your system. Oatmeal Eating oatmeal on an empty stomach has several advantages. In addition to coating the lining of the stomach, preventing irritation from your bodiy’s naturally occurring hyd Continue reading >>

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

Fruits are the perfect snack. They are loaded with nutrients and fiber, relatively low in calories, and easy to bring to work. However, they do contain naturally occurring sugars, sometimes in large amounts. This can be a concern for those who struggle to manage their blood sugars. This article takes a science-based look at the most suitable fruits for diabetics. 1. Blueberries Blueberries are quite low in sugar, with 10 grams per 100 grams of fruit (1). But that sugar is also accompanied by 2 grams of fiber. This is important because when sugar and fiber are eaten together, blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly (2, 3). It’s the reason 10 grams of sugar from fresh fruits will not have the same effect on blood sugar levels as 10 grams of sugar from a candy bar. In addition, blueberries provide loads of other beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that protect our cells from damage. Interestingly, a study on over 187,000 people tracked over two decades found those who ate the most blueberries had more than a 25% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who ate the fewest (4). Blueberries are great for a snack, and you can even enjoy them in salads. Although they can be particularly expensive, know that frozen blueberries are still nutritious and often much more affordable. 2. Strawberries Strawberries contain even less sugar than blueberries, with only 5 grams per 100 grams of fruit (5). This makes them a great choice for diabetics. They also provide fiber, manganese, folate, and a lot of vitamin C. In fact, 100 grams of strawberries (5-6 large strawberries) provides 98% of our daily vitamin C requirements. Strawberries are a great addition to breakfast foods like oats or yogurt, but they are also delicious on their own. 3. Blackberries Blackberries stand out as n Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Eating the wrong foods can mess with your blood sugar. By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide. Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions. Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Why Does Carb Intake Matter for People With Diabetes? Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of these three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn’t digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn’t raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or “net” carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body’s nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it’s important to avoid the foods listed below. 1. Sugar-Swe Continue reading >>

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

Wondering what blood sugar has to do with you, if you don’t have diabetes? Keeping your blood sugar levels as steady as possiblenow may help you avoid getting diabetes later. “As you get older, your risk for type 2 diabetes goes up,” says Alissa Rumsey, Registered Dietitian and Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Since you can’t modify your age, it is important to take other steps to lower your risk, including maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough exercise, and balancing your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar.” Controlling your blood sugar will also just make you feel better. “It’s best to control blood sugar—it keeps your energy stable,” says Leann Olansky, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “If your blood sugar doesn’t vary that much before and after a meal, that’s a healthier way to be.” Unrelated to diabetes, symptoms of occasional high blood sugar aren’t life-threatening, but rather unpleasant and only potentially dangerous if you suffer from other health problems. “When your blood sugar is too high, it can make you feel sluggish,” says Dr. Olansky. “When it’s higher still, it can lead to dehydration and make your blood pressure unstable, and cause you to urinate more often, especially at night.” But when your blood sugar remains chronically high, insulin, a hormone that’s supposed to help your body store sugar as energy, stops working as it should. “Prolonged high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance, meaning your body isn’t able to use insulin properly,” says Rumsey. “Over time this insulin resistance can develop into diabetes, when insulin isn’t able to keep your blood sugar within normal levels.” Current research reveals an association between spik Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly Smoothies

Diabetic Friendly Smoothies

Living with diabetes is all about managing your blood sugar levels. This is a chronic illness, but you can live well with it if you manage it. A huge part of that management is diet. Several lifestyle factors can affect your well-being as a diabetic and your blood sugar levels, but what you eat on a daily basis is one of the most important. Eating healthful, balanced meals can help maintain a steady blood sugar level and smoothies can be a part of this balance. There are even some recommended superfoods that are particularly good for controlling blood sugar and they all work well in smoothies. Of course, it is important that you discuss any lifestyle changes, such as your diet, with your doctor. Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high blood sugar, or glucose. Most common are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes because it is usually first diagnosed during childhood. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas doesn’t make insulin, the hormone that regulates glucose. In a healthy person, the pancreas releases insulin when blood sugar levels get too high. The insulin goes to work lowering the amount of glucose in the blood. Type 1 diabetics need to inject insulin regularly to maintain a normal blood sugar level. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but your body has developed a resistance to it and it no longer adequately lowers blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes is sometimes called adult-onset, as it is rare to develop in children. In adults type 2 is the most common kind of diabetes, accounting for around 90 percent of all cases. It develops in stages and can be prevented or even reversed with proper lifestyle changes, including diet, weight loss, and exe Continue reading >>

What's In Your Pot?

What's In Your Pot?

According to consumer research, the UK population spends a staggering 1.7 billion a year on yogurt and fromage frais. With an ever-increasing range of yogurt varieties on offer, it can be difficult to work out why one variety may be more or less healthy than another. Here at Enjoy Food, we thought it was about time we took a closer look at this popular product and find out what exactly is in those pots… The good news Yogurt provides many health benefits. Made with milk, it contains protein and calcium needed for healthy bones and teeth. Some yogurts also have added vitamin D, which helps our body to absorb calcium. It’s also good to know that low-fat yogurts have just as much calcium as the full-fat versions. Some research even suggests that eating yogurt can help you to feel fuller, which may make it easier to manage your weight. As well as a useful portable snack, or instant pudding when you fancy a sweet fix, plain, natural, or greek yogurt can be used as a topping on fruit and desserts instead of cream, in smoothies, or in cooking. Spotlight on sugar As with most manufactured food products, you need to take a step back from the marketing hype and take a closer look at the food label, to check whether that innocent looking pot is as healthy as it seems. Many yogurts, particularly the ones aimed at children, are crammed full of the ‘free sugars’ we all need to cut back on. Looking at the label, the carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ provides useful information. An amount in grams (g) will be given. Spotting 'free sugars' This figure includes sugars which come naturally from the milk used to make the yogurt, known as ‘lactose’, as well as any sugar added to the yogurt, ie ‘free sugars’, and sugar that comes naturally from any fruit or fruit puree that h Continue reading >>

Dietitian Cassie

Dietitian Cassie

5 Reasons Why People With Diabetes Need to Eat Fat In our personal coaching program we work with hundreds of clients who have diabetes and, time and time again, we see their need for blood sugar reducing medications (like insulin and Metformin) decrease when they eat more fat. A common misconception when you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes is youre doomed to forever be a diabetic and your need for pills and insulin will continue to increase for the rest of your life. This flat out isnt true. We can prevent and reverse the damage in our cells when we are eating the right foods in the right amounts, and this includes plenty of fat. We know that healthy fat is important for everyone, for a million different reasons. If I were to pick one population who especially need to eat fat, even more than most, it would be people with diabetes.Ironically, this is the exact opposite of what we are being taught by the American Diabetes Association and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. These same associations are known to cover up blood sugar imbalances with prescription medication, not the functional medicine, real food approach we embracehere. The standard diabetes treatment approach is a backwards, after the fact approach because it focuses on treating the symptoms rather than the underlying cause. With proper nutrition, medication isnt needed to target elevated blood glucose levels. Carbohydrate counting is still considered the gold standard, ensuring that people with diabetes are getting enough carbohydrates for blood sugar control, with the general goal being 45-60 grams at meals and 15-30 grams at snacks. This boggles my mind since carbohydrates are the VERY thing that cause spikes in blood sugar levels! Fat doesnt spike blood sugar levels, carbohydrates do. Once you un Continue reading >>

Light Berry Frozen Yogurt [no Sugar Added, Diabetic Friendly]

Light Berry Frozen Yogurt [no Sugar Added, Diabetic Friendly]

Valentine’s Day is coming in 3 days!!! What better way to show you care to your family and loved ones than by offering them a sweet, but healthier treat like frozen yogurt rather than ice cream! Frozen berries in the winter are the best way to still get in some awesome antioxidants and enjoy a taste of the summer! Mixing it with some delicious yogurt and a few other simple ingredients and you have a fantastically smooth and creamy dessert without all the fat and calories. Does your family love ice cream? My hubby and kids do and I hate buying it! I’m sensitive to dairy so I have to limit how much I have but occasionally I can tolerate some and this is my choice. I received some coupons to try Brown Cow Cream top yogurt and fell in love with the texture. It is full fat and typically I steer away on a regular basis and use nonfat Greek, but in this case and for this recipe I knew Brown Cow would be the best choice. But you can really substitute another plain yogurt of your choice. I can’t say that using nonfat plain yogurt will really provide you a nice creamy frozen yogurt, but you can certainly experiment. For myself I would probably use nonfat but for the family who will compare this to regular ice cream, nope! This is a winning recipe and if my kids loved it, I know it’s good! I’ve made it twice and it melts fairly quickly hence the pictures above. We added my homemade magic shell above and some homemade dairy free whipped cream. FYI: If you do not have an ice cream machine, just freeze it. This frozen yogurt will never be hard like ice cream, more soft like soft serve, but incredibly yummy just the same! Other frozen treats you might like: Continue reading >>

Activia Yogurt

Activia Yogurt

For all you Yogurt lovers, that absolutely HAVE to have it, this is by far the BEST choice for your body! Most yogurts are blasted with sugars that people usually don't even realize. They think it's healthy due to the size of it, and also because it carries fruits. Sometimes thats the case. But for the most part, it might be one of the most fattening things you eat daily and not even be aware of it. Being Diabetic, I have to watch my carb (sugar) intake with every bite I take. One of the best snacks that I have found that has been, not only tasty, but the healthiest treat I put in my body daily. I always laughed when I saw the commercial for Activia because its main objective is to convince people that it helps regulate your digestive system, but when my Nutritionist insisted on it, I couldn't help but try it out myself. And might I add, it absolutely works with the digestive system! They aren't lying one bit when they advertise that:). I have come to LOVE it! It's something I can't leave the grocery store without. * I recommend getting the "Light" Activia, it has less carbs/sugars. Hope you enjoy it as much as I do! Continue reading >>

Irish Dietitian Orla Walsh: Top Food Tips For Type 1 & 2 Diabetics

Irish Dietitian Orla Walsh: Top Food Tips For Type 1 & 2 Diabetics

If you were to line up 15 Irish people aged between 20 and 79 years, one of these people is likely to have diabetes. For a condition which is regarded as relatively preventable, this number is staggering. What's worse, this number is increasing. In fact, it's estimated that one-in-five people over the age of 45 years are at risk of developing type 2 diabetes within the next five years. Weight loss is often necessary as the majority of those with type 2 diabetes are overweight and being overweight is one of the reasons why diabetes develops. To put this into perspective, the risk of having undiagnosed diabetes increases by 90pc for every 5kg/m2 increase in BMI (body mass index). Nutrition can prevent, control and put you in remission from type 2 diabetes. Many of the healthy eating tips for those with type 2 diabetes are based around weight loss if overweight, controlling blood sugar levels and keeping the heart healthy. Here are some simple dos and don'ts. ■ Top tips for type 2 diabetics 1 Don't forget that total carbohydrate intake counts All carbohydrate-rich foods cause your blood sugar (aka blood glucose) levels to rise, regardless of how healthy the source is. Some carbohydrates cause blood sugar levels to rise slowly while some cause it to rise quickly. Therefore all diabetics need to be aware of the quantity and quality of the carbohydrates they are eating. Plants contain carbohydrate, in varying degrees. It's important that you're carbohydrate-savvy and know your portions. For example, fruit is a healthy food that is rich in vitamins, fibre and phytocompounds. Fruit also contains carbohydrate. Therefore if you are a diabetic, despite fruit being super healthy, eating lots of fruit in one sitting is not advisable. The carbohydrate within fruit is released into Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Diabetes Diet, Eating, & Physical Activity

Nutrition and physical activity are important parts of a healthy lifestyle when you have diabetes. Along with other benefits, following a healthy meal plan and being active can help you keep your blood glucose level, also called blood sugar, in your target range. To manage your blood glucose, you need to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity and diabetes medicine, if you take any. What you choose to eat, how much you eat, and when you eat are all important in keeping your blood glucose level in the range that your health care team recommends. Becoming more active and making changes in what you eat and drink can seem challenging at first. You may find it easier to start with small changes and get help from your family, friends, and health care team. Eating well and being physically active most days of the week can help you keep your blood glucose level, blood pressure, and cholesterol in your target ranges prevent or delay diabetes problems feel good and have more energy What foods can I eat if I have diabetes? You may worry that having diabetes means going without foods you enjoy. The good news is that you can still eat your favorite foods, but you might need to eat smaller portions or enjoy them less often. Your health care team will help create a diabetes meal plan for you that meets your needs and likes. The key to eating with diabetes is to eat a variety of healthy foods from all food groups, in the amounts your meal plan outlines. The food groups are vegetables nonstarchy: includes broccoli, carrots, greens, peppers, and tomatoes starchy: includes potatoes, corn, and green peas fruits—includes oranges, melon, berries, apples, bananas, and grapes grains—at least half of your grains for the day should be whole grains includes wheat, rice, oats, co Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt

Diabetes And Yogurt

Plain nonfat Greek yogurt is an excellent source of protein for a person on a diabetic diet. It is low in sugar and carbs, and it is considered a complete protein because it contains all 9 of the essential amino acids your body needs. Vegetarians know that a complete protein is one that contains all 9 amino acids. Nuts and beans do not contain all of the necessary amino acids. Eating a few fresh almonds or one Brazil nut at the same time as you eat the nonfat yogurt aids in its absorption into the body. A little healthy oil is good for the body, although it does add calories. Only one fresh Brazil nut a day, as they are high in selenium. You will exceed the recommended consumption amount of selenium if you eat more than one a day when your other food intake for the day is taken into consideration. If you consume a yogurt that has added fruit, then you might as well eat candy, as the calories and sugar content aren’t that far apart and you’ll have a tougher time controlling your blood sugar. A popular brand of plain nonfat Greek yogurt contains 90 calories, 0 fat, 7 grams carbs, 4 grams sugar and 15 grams of protein. This is a good mix that works with diabetes and yogurt. The lower the grams of sugar, the easier it’ll be to control your blood sugars. Reading the Labels A typical fruit yogurt has 230 calories, 46 grams carbs and 26 grams of sugar. If you shop around, you can find yogurts that contain fruit with less sugar and less fat, but make sure you read that label carefully. When looking at the labels on yogurt, always make sure that they contain the live active cultures to get the true benefit from the yogurt, and stay away from “whey concentrates” or any yogurt that has added “thickeners.” Greek Yogurt Options One of the most marvelous new introductio Continue reading >>

More in diabetes