diabetestalk.net

Can You Eat Yogurt If Your Diabetic?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

When a person has diabetes, they need to carefully consider the contents of each meal. This can be especially true for carbohydrate-containing food, which not only includes desserts and other sweet treats, but bread, pasta, and fresh fruits. One fruit that traditionally has been on the "avoid" list for those with diabetes is bananas. However, for the most part, bananas eaten in moderation can be safely enjoyed when a person has diabetes. Bananas grow on banana plants that can have anywhere from 50 to 150 bananas in each bunch of fruit. The individual bananas are sold in varying sizes, from small to extra-large, the size-grading being determined by their length. Nutritional breakdown Overall, bananas are low in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol. They also have a good mix of nutrients, including vitamin B6, potassium, and manganese. However, some doctors and dietitians may give bananas greater nutritional scrutiny when considering them for people with diabetes, because bananas are high in sugar relative to their calories. One medium banana has an estimated glycemic load of 11, according to Harvard Health Publishing on glycemic loads. Glycemic load is a measure of a food's impact on blood sugar. A glycemic load of fewer than 10 is considered low, while one above 20 is high. Can you eat bananas if you have diabetes? Examples of lower-sugar fruit options include apples, grapes, and pears. Fruits with higher sugar levels include papayas and pineapples. However, those with diabetes do not have to eliminate bananas from their diet, or any other fruit for that matter. Their other nutritional values in terms of vitamins and minerals can make them a healthy option for those with diabetes when consumed in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommend incorporating fr Continue reading >>

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Smooth, creamy, thick — Greek yogurt is one of the hottest foods around, and its popularity shows no signs of abating. With a pudding-like texture and a slightly tart flavor, Greek yogurt also has more protein and fewer carbs and fewer sugars than traditional yogurt. This means that Greek yogurt can be even better for people with type 2 diabetes, says Tami Ross, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator in Lexington, Kentucky. "My patients love the consistency of it," Ross explains. "Even the patients who are not big on yogurt or milk products overwhelmingly seem to like Greek yogurt." Greek yogurt's thick consistency comes from straining it to remove liquid whey. This process increases the amount of protein per serving and removes some of the carbohydrates, which people with diabetes must watch carefully. "For folks with diabetes, the lower carbs are a plus," Ross notes. "You can work in the yogurt for a snack without having to account for so many carbohydrates." The increased protein can also help you feel that you've had a more substantial snack, so you'll feel more satisfied and won't be hungry for something else quite so quickly. "In terms of promoting satiety and helping people feel full, it's great," Ross says. And starting your day with Greek yogurt may even help you manage your blood sugar throughout the day. Eating low-GI foods for breakfast helps prevent blood-sugar spikes later on, one recent study found. How to Find the Right Greek Yogurt Of course, not all Greek yogurts are created equal. With many brands and flavors on the market, it's important to read nutrition labels carefully to find one that will work with a diabetes-friendly diet. Carbohydrate content is the most important item to look for on the nutrition label of Greek yogurt, since it accounts for the sugar Continue reading >>

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Dietary Recommendations For Gestational Diabetes

Diabetes diagnosed during pregnancy is called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes occurs in about 7 percent of all pregnancies. It usually arises in the second half of pregnancy and goes away as soon as the baby is born. However, if gestational diabetes is not treated, you may experience complications. The first step in treating gestational diabetes is to modify your diet to help keep your blood sugar level in the normal range, while still eating a healthy diet. Most women with well-controlled blood sugar deliver healthy babies without any complications. One way of keeping your blood sugar levels in normal range is by monitoring the amount of carbohydrates in your diet. Carbohydrate foods digest and turn into blood glucose (a type of sugar). Glucose in the blood is necessary because it is the fuel for your body and nourishment your baby receives from you. However, it's important that glucose levels stay within target. Carbohydrates in Food Carbohydrates are found in the following foods: Milk and yogurt Fruits and juices Rice, grains, cereals and pasta Breads, tortillas, crackers, bagels and rolls Dried beans, split peas and lentils Potatoes, corn, yams, peas and winter squash Sweets and desserts, such as sugar, honey, syrups, pastries, cookies, soda and candy also typically have large amounts of carbohydrate. Carbohydrates in foods are measured in units called grams. You can count how many carbohydrates are in foods by reading food labels and learning the exchange lists. The two most important pieces of information on food labels for a carbohydrate-controlled diet is the serving size and grams of total carbohydrate in each serving. Dietary Recommendations It is important to be meet with a registered dietitian to have your diet assessed. The dietitian will calcula Continue reading >>

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

7 Of The Best Fruits For Diabetics (based On Sugar And Nutrients)

Fruits are the perfect snack. They are loaded with nutrients and fiber, relatively low in calories, and easy to bring to work. However, they do contain naturally occurring sugars, sometimes in large amounts. This can be a concern for those who struggle to manage their blood sugars. This article takes a science-based look at the most suitable fruits for diabetics. 1. Blueberries Blueberries are quite low in sugar, with 10 grams per 100 grams of fruit (1). But that sugar is also accompanied by 2 grams of fiber. This is important because when sugar and fiber are eaten together, blood sugar levels don’t spike as quickly (2, 3). It’s the reason 10 grams of sugar from fresh fruits will not have the same effect on blood sugar levels as 10 grams of sugar from a candy bar. In addition, blueberries provide loads of other beneficial nutrients and antioxidants that protect our cells from damage. Interestingly, a study on over 187,000 people tracked over two decades found those who ate the most blueberries had more than a 25% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who ate the fewest (4). Blueberries are great for a snack, and you can even enjoy them in salads. Although they can be particularly expensive, know that frozen blueberries are still nutritious and often much more affordable. 2. Strawberries Strawberries contain even less sugar than blueberries, with only 5 grams per 100 grams of fruit (5). This makes them a great choice for diabetics. They also provide fiber, manganese, folate, and a lot of vitamin C. In fact, 100 grams of strawberries (5-6 large strawberries) provides 98% of our daily vitamin C requirements. Strawberries are a great addition to breakfast foods like oats or yogurt, but they are also delicious on their own. 3. Blackberries Blackberries stand out as n Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Guidelines For Healthy Eating

Diabetes: Guidelines For Healthy Eating

Along with blood sugar checking and insulin injections, healthy eating is a very important part of diabetes care. Healthy eating is important for all children for normal growth and development. A child with diabetes is no exception. Learn about specific foods like carbohydrates and the timing of meals and snacks to help keep your child's blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Eating a healthy balanced diet It is especially important for children and teens newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes to eat a healthy, balanced diet. Feed your child a variety of foods from the 4 food groups. The 4 food groups are: Grain products, including breads and cereals Vegetables and fruit Milk and milk products Meat and meat alternatives, such as legumes, eggs, tofu and peanut butter Carbohydrate means sugar Foods that contain carbohydrates are foods that contain sugar or turn into sugar in the body. The sugar may occur naturally in the food or may have been added during processing. Carbohydrates do not always taste sweet. Therefore, we cannot always rely on our taste buds to tell us which foods contain carbohydrates and which foods do not. Examples of foods that contain carbohydrates include: breads, cereals, and grain products fruits and some vegetables milk and some milk products sweet foods like sugar, honey, candy, chocolate, and regular (not diet) pop Foods that contain carbohydrates give the body energy We all need energy to think, walk, and play. We also need energy to keep our hearts beating and lungs breathing. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use carbohydrates to make energy. When insulin is injected, it works together with the food that your child eats to keep blood sugars levels in a healthy range. Eating foods that contain carbohydrates at regular times throughout t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly Smoothies

Diabetic Friendly Smoothies

Living with diabetes is all about managing your blood sugar levels. This is a chronic illness, but you can live well with it if you manage it. A huge part of that management is diet. Several lifestyle factors can affect your well-being as a diabetic and your blood sugar levels, but what you eat on a daily basis is one of the most important. Eating healthful, balanced meals can help maintain a steady blood sugar level and smoothies can be a part of this balance. There are even some recommended superfoods that are particularly good for controlling blood sugar and they all work well in smoothies. Of course, it is important that you discuss any lifestyle changes, such as your diet, with your doctor. Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes mellitus is a group of diseases characterized by high blood sugar, or glucose. Most common are type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is sometimes called juvenile diabetes because it is usually first diagnosed during childhood. If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas doesn’t make insulin, the hormone that regulates glucose. In a healthy person, the pancreas releases insulin when blood sugar levels get too high. The insulin goes to work lowering the amount of glucose in the blood. Type 1 diabetics need to inject insulin regularly to maintain a normal blood sugar level. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but your body has developed a resistance to it and it no longer adequately lowers blood glucose levels. Type 2 diabetes is sometimes called adult-onset, as it is rare to develop in children. In adults type 2 is the most common kind of diabetes, accounting for around 90 percent of all cases. It develops in stages and can be prevented or even reversed with proper lifestyle changes, including diet, weight loss, and exe Continue reading >>

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

Yogurt, typically made from cow's milk (however, nowadays there are many alternatives), is a source of carbohydrate which is also full of good bacteria, calcium, and protein. If you have diabetes, yogurt can be a smart food choice; however, the trick is to know which kind of yogurt to choose and which to skip out on. What to Look for in a Yogurt In the best kinds of yogurt, you get a good balance of protein and carbohydrate, along with calcium and healthy probiotics. You also don't get a lot of added sugar, additives, food coloring, or saturated fat. Choosing a low-fat or non-fat yogurt version can help you to reduce your total calorie intake as well as keep your saturated fat (the type of fat that increase bad LDL cholesterol) low. In addition, since yogurt is a source of carbohydrate, you'll want to choose a yogurt that is low in added sugars such as fruited yogurts or those yogurts with added granola, or other toppings that are rich in sugar. Therefore, it's best to choose plain, low-fat yogurt. If you need to add sweetness, top your yogurt with some berries or peaches. Frozen varieties can make your yogurt seem "syrup-y", too, for more fiber and less added sugar. Greek Yogurt vs. Regular Yogurt Greek yogurt is regular yogurt that's been strained, removing some of the whey and leaving behind a thicker, more protein-rich yogurt. Greek yogurt is readily available in regular grocery stores; find it in the refrigerated dairy section. Regular yogurt provides 5 grams of protein per 6-ounce serving, while Greek yogurt provides up to 20 grams, depending on the brand. Because it has more protein, Greek yogurt has about 1/3 the carbohydrate of regular yogurt. And, because lactose is a source of carbohydrate in dairy products, this means that many people find Greek yogurt easie Continue reading >>

Diabetes Nutrition: Including Sweets In Your Meal Plan

Diabetes Nutrition: Including Sweets In Your Meal Plan

Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods, but sweets aren't necessarily off-limits. Here's how to include sweets in your meal plan. Diabetes nutrition focuses on healthy foods. But you can eat sweets once in a while without feeling guilty or significantly interfering with your blood sugar control. The key to diabetes nutrition is moderation. The scoop on sugar For years, people with diabetes were warned to avoid sweets. But what researchers understand about diabetes nutrition has changed. Total carbohydrates are what counts. It was once assumed that honey, candy and other sweets would raise your blood sugar level faster and higher than would fruits, vegetables or "starchy" foods, such as potatoes, pasta or whole-grain bread. But this isn't true, as long as the sweets are eaten with a meal and balanced with other foods in your meal plan. Although different types of carbohydrates affect your blood sugar level differently, it's the total amount of carbohydrates that really matters. But don't overdo empty calories. Of course, it's still best to consider sweets as only a small part of your eating. Candy, cookies and other sweets have few vitamins and minerals and are often high in fat and calories. You'll get more empty calories — calories without essential nutrients — when you eat sweets. Have your cake and eat it, too Sweets count as carbohydrates in your meal plan. The trick is substituting small portions of sweets for other carbohydrates — such as bread, tortillas, rice, crackers, cereal, fruit, juice, milk, yogurt or potatoes — in your meals. To allow room for sweets as part of a meal, you have two options: Replace some of the carbohydrates in your meal with a sweet. Swap a high-carb-containing food in your meal for something with fewer carbohydrates and eat Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

The Diabetes Diet

The Diabetes Diet

What's the best diet for diabetes? Whether you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes, your nutritional needs are virtually the same as everyone else, so no special foods are necessary. But you do need to pay attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat. While following a Mediterranean or other heart-healthy diet can help with this, the most important thing you can do is to lose a little weight. Losing just 5% to 10% of your total weight can help you lower your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol levels. Losing weight and eating healthier can also have a profound effect on your mood, energy, and sense of wellbeing. Even if you’ve already developed diabetes, it’s not too late to make a positive change. By eating healthier, being more physically active, and losing weight, you can reduce your symptoms or even reverse diabetes. The bottom line is that you have more control over your health than you may think. The biggest risk for diabetes: belly fat Being overweight or obese is the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes. However, your risk is higher if you tend to carry your weight around your abdomen as opposed to your hips and thighs. A lot of belly fat surrounds the abdominal organs and liver and is closely linked to insulin resistance. You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are: A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more Calories obtained from fructose (found in sugary beverages such as soda, energy and sports drinks, coffee drinks, and processed foods like doughnuts, muffins, cereal, candy and granola bars) are more likely to add weight around your abdomen. Cutting back on sugary foods can mean a slimmer waistline as well as a lowe Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

10 Diabetic Foods To Avoid For Good Blood Sugar Control

These ten diabetic foods to avoid are your enemies if you are trying to control blood sugar. That is because of insulin resistance in a type 2 diabetic and the insulin impairment in a type 1 diabetic. The foods listed here cause huge spikes in insulin, so your pancreas has to respond quickly. But diabetics have impaired insulin response. We need to stay away from those foods that are easily digested and release glucose in a flood. Of course, table sugar causes a blood sugar spike. Sugar in all its forms tops the list of diabetic foods to avoid. All type 1 and type 2 diabetic have been told this. The problem lies in the other things, foods that act like sugar when they hit our stomach and start being digested. Here are the ten worst of them. White pasta is made from refined flour, one of a diabetic's worst enemies. That makes it one of the top diabetic foods to avoid. White flour has every bit of fiber and vitamins stripped away, leaving only simple carbohydrate, which is one step away from simple sugar. It is in nearly all processed foods in some form, and in your digestive system it becomes pure glucose very fast. White rice has been polished, a refining process that removes the outer parts where fiber and vitamins are found. All that is left is the endosperm, which is also a simple carbohydrate. Like white flour it turns to glucose very fast. Blood sugar spikes, insulin is pumped out to meet it, and very soon you have a sugar low and feel hungry again. If you are fighting obesity and diabetes, white rice and white pasta are bound to make your battle harder. Does that mean no pasta or rice in your diet? No, it means you look for alternatives. Two great ones are brown rice and whole wheat pasta. Both are available at your grocery store next to the white versions. They a Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Eating the wrong foods can mess with your blood sugar. By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide. Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions. Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Why Does Carb Intake Matter for People With Diabetes? Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of these three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn’t digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn’t raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or “net” carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body’s nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it’s important to avoid the foods listed below. 1. Sugar-Swe Continue reading >>

4 Tips For Eating Well With High Cholesterol

4 Tips For Eating Well With High Cholesterol

Here’s some good news: it doesn’t take a huge effort to start making heart-healthy food decisions. Especially when you have diabetes and high cholesterol, watching your diet is critical. There are changes you can make to what you eat every day. We recommend that you talk to a certified diabetes educator or registered dietitian about changing how you eat. They can work with you to create a meal plan that is delicious, flexible (you won’t always be eating the same thing), and healthy—for both your heart and your diabetes. In the meantime, here are 4 tips to help you eat well when you have high cholesterol. Eat More Whole Grains Conveniently enough, many pastas and breads have whole grain versions. The next time you’re shopping, reach for the whole grain pasta instead of the regular pasta. Also, try replacing white rice with brown rice. You could also have whole grain couscous. Eat More Fruits and Veggies We know you’ve heard it before, but it’s true: you should eat your fruits and veggies. All the fiber in fruits and vegetables can help lower your cholesterol, so try to work more of them into your day. For example, you could mix fruit into your yogurt for breakfast. You can snack on raw vegetables throughout the day. You can make it a point to shop your local farmers’ market (if you have one) to get seasonal produce. Cook with Olive Oil Instead of cooking with vegetable oil, cook with olive oil, which is a “healthy” fat. Olive oil has monounsaturated fats in it, which are healthier than saturated fat or trans fat. Limit High Cholesterol Foods The next time you’re at the store, make it a point to read the food label of everything before you put it in the cart. Choose foods that are low cholesterol—or even no cholesterol! The Nutrition Facts label wi Continue reading >>

Eating Yogurt Lowers Blood Pressure

Eating Yogurt Lowers Blood Pressure

Selected for you this week: an article wich reviews the benefits of yogurt on blood pressure, by Greg Marshall. Every week, we bring you valuable quotes from around the web on yogurt. Yogurt is a dairy product produced by the fermentation of milk in the presence of bacteria; specifically, Lactobacillus andStreptococcus. While we normally think of milk as the stuff that comes from cows, goats, sheep, and even camels, but milk from plant sources like almonds and coconuts may also be successfully fermented. Research presented at the American Heart Association’s High Blood Pressure 2012 Scientific Sessions suggests that consuming yogurt may help to lower your risk of developing hypertension (aka high blood pressure)1. In the 15-year study, 2,000 healthy volunteers who had normal blood pressure were followed and monitored for yogurt consumption via questionnaires completed over three intervals during the observation period. Those participants who ate the equivalent of at least one six-ounce pot of yogurt every three days (approximately 2% of their daily caloric intake) were 33% less likely to develop high blood pressure2. Moreover, the blood pressure of the yogurt-eaters rose less than that of non-yogurt consumers. How is yogurt made? Milk is first heated to 176°F (80°C) to wipe out any unwanted bacteria and to alter the structure of the proteins in the milk, allowing it to set rather than form curds. The milk is then cooled to around 112°F (45°C) and maintained at that temperature for several hours to permit fermentation in the presence of added bacterial culture. What is hypertension? Hypertension, or high blood pressure, is a measure of the force with which blood is being pumped through your veins and arteries. Left untreated, high blood pressure can cause tears and Continue reading >>

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

Diet For Gestational Diabetes

I have gestational diabetes. Why do I have to watch what I eat? Eating well is an important way to stay healthy for all women in pregnancy. But if you have gestational diabetes (GD), choosing the right food is especially important. When you eat, your digestive system breaks most of your food down into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is one of your body’s main sources of energy. Glucose enters your bloodstream and then, with the help of insulin (a hormone made by your pancreas), your cells use the glucose as fuel. However, if your body doesn't produce enough insulin – or your cells have a problem responding to the insulin – too much glucose stays in your blood, instead of moving into the cells and getting converted to energy. Pregnancy hormones reduce the effect of insulin, so your body has to make more of it. If your body can't keep up with the demands for insulin, your blood sugar levels can get too high. That's when GD happens. It's important to control it, as it can lead to problems for your baby. You may be able to control GD by changing what you eat and combining a healthy diet with regular exercise. Learn all about gestational diabetes, including risk factors, symptoms to watch out for, and how it's managed. How will I have to change my diet? If you’ve been diagnosed with GD, your doctor should refer you to a dietitian who can work out a special diet for you. Every pregnancy is different, so what works for one woman may not work for you. You’ll probably need to experiment with different foods and combinations of foods before you work out what’s best for your body. Your dietitian will be able to help you with this. Women with GD say the foods they can tolerate often change as their pregnancy progresses, which can be frustrating. Others say their Continue reading >>

More in diabetes