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Can You Eat What You Want With An Insulin Pump

Type 1 - Insulin Pump And Weight Loss | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 1 - Insulin Pump And Weight Loss | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi wondered if anyone could help. I am about to be given an insulin pump, I have been having continuous hypos and my diabetes nurse said the pump will help. I am trying to lose weight as I had a baby a year ago and put on crazy amounts of weight and I am struggling to lose this. Do you know if the insulin pump will help with weight loss? I feel so down about my weight and I am trying everything I have a personal trainer but the weight isn't moving. I think it could help a bit, but it will take a lot of effort. For example, I go running after work. At the moment I have to have a snack before I leave to keep my BG up and prevent a hypo. On the pump it is possible to set a TBR which will (I think) eliminate the need for that snack and hence increase the benefits of the exercise. I am just hoping it stops the need to eat all the time!!! (even worse when I have a hypo). I feel I am at a total loss with weight loss and my diabetes. I get married in November and worried I am not going to lose the weight. Hope it all goes well with your pump all the hard work will be worth it. Hi there, some people find they put on weight with the pump. I've been told that this is generally because people eat more because they don't have to inject again. Have you been on a diabetes education course- we have DAFNE here..that can help with managing the low blood sugars. The rule is-I think- catch it as early as possible and have 15gs then test againand repeat if necessary. Weight loss and diabetes is hard; I've found running really helps. hale710; it's great on the pump- I just reduce my basal to 75% for an hour and it seems to keep me level. A pump, once you get the basal sett Continue reading >>

People With Diabetes Can Eat Everything, Really?

People With Diabetes Can Eat Everything, Really?

There’s a four-letter word lurking behind many conversations about diabetes – and, at the risk of offending people with my language, it’s spelled c-a-r-b. Before I was diagnosed with diabetes in 2001, I rarely thought about carbohydrates – and when I did, my associations were usually positive. I’d gather with my swim team to binge on pasta before big meets, or bake brownies and cookies for my classmates in my spare time. In my mind, carbohydrates=energy=good (or, at very least, delicious). Then, one cold, Saturday morning 13 years ago – the moment when I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes — that relationship was abruptly and permanently changed. Carbohydrates were now mathematical problems to be managed, challenges hiding in every meal. I was surprised by many social occasions I now realized were focused around carbohydrates – happy hours, ice cream socials, birthday parties, late-night college pizza breaks. Joining friends for dinner became a balancing act: did I make special requests because of my diabetes and potentially inconvenience people, or did I go along with the group’s Chinese/Indian/Thai/Ethiopian/pizza/sushi plans, and suffer the blood sugar consequences afterwards? For a while – years, actually – I tended toward the latter. (Even today, when plenty of people make special requests based on vegetarianism or other dietary preferences, I find it difficult to ask people to go to a different restaurant because of my diabetes.) Like many people with diabetes, I’d internalized the message, meant to be encouraging, that today’s insulin pumps and glucose meters mean that we can eat whatever we want. Granted, I soon found that many foods simply weren’t worth the effort – I just don’t like bagels that much, and don’t find anything par Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

People with type 2 diabetes do not always have to take insulin right away; that is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. The longer someone has type 2 diabetes, the more likely they will require insulin. Just as in type 1 diabetes, insulin is a way to control your blood glucose level. With type 2 diabetes, though, dietary changes, increasing physical activity, and some oral medications are usually enough to bring your blood glucose to a normal level. To learn about how the hormone insulin works, we have an article that explains the role of insulin. There are several reasons people with type 2 diabetes may want to use insulin: It can quickly bring your blood glucose level down to a healthier range. If your blood glucose level is excessively high when you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the doctor may have you use insulin to lower your blood glucose level—in a way that’s much faster than diet and exercise. Insulin will give your body a respite; it (and especially the beta cells that produce insulin) has been working overtime to try to bring down your blood glucose level. In this scenario, you’d also watch what you eat and exercise, but having your blood glucose under better control may make it easier to adjust to those lifestyle changes. It has fewer side effects than some of the medications: Insulin is a synthetic version of a hormone our bodies produce. Therefore, it interacts with your body in a more natural way than medications do, leading to fewer side effects. The one side effect is hypoglycemia. It can be cheaper. Diabetes medications can be expensive, although there is an array of options that try to cater to people of all economic levels. However, insulin is generally cheaper than medications (on a monthly basis), especially if the doctor wants yo Continue reading >>

Can I Eat What I Want If I Take Enough Insulin

Can I Eat What I Want If I Take Enough Insulin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can I eat what I want if I take enough insulin I am new to this so would appreciate any help I can get. In theory, can I eat whatever I want if I use enough insulin? I'm not on insulin but I don't believe so! I've tagged @daisy1 to give you the newcomers welcome information. I am new to this so would appreciate any help I can get. In theory, can I eat whatever I want if I use enough insulin? Your post is in the T2 forum. Are you Type 2, and do you currently take insulin? Thank you both for your replies. I will give some details of my case... Well, this is my third pregnancy with diabetes, second with insulin. I'm very slim, have no family history of diabetes but have suffered with severe PCOS in my history so they reckon this could be a contributing factor as to why I have developed GD. The thing is, I have had normal sized babies (all under 8lbs) and this baby is pretty average sized looking too. I am almost 7 months pregnant. In my last pregnancy I was on insulin for 4 months and this one it will be a little over that. The GD disappeared after both pregnancies but I am well aware that this is not always the case and I could find myself with permanent D2 after this pregnancy. I must admit that when I've wanted a cake I just injected more insulin in this pregnancy and the last. So I guess I'm just wondering if this is ok and if not, why is it not ok? Not in the GD sense but with diabetes in general I am moving you post to the pregnancy section @Looly where it may get the answers you need. The pregnancy forums are generally not helpful as they are made up with members who are trying to come to terms with diabetes for the first time. I would very much l Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

What is an insulin pump? When you have diabetes and rely on insulin to control your blood sugar, insulin administration can mean multiple daily injections. Insulin pumps serve as an alternative. Instead of injections, the insulin pump delivers a continuous, preset amount of insulin, plus bolus doses when needed. Although you must still check your blood sugar levels, the pump can take the place of multiple daily insulin injections and help some people with diabetes better manage their blood glucose. An insulin pump is a small device that closely resembles a beeper or miniature computer. Slightly smaller than a deck of playing cards, the insulin pump has several key components: Reservoir: The reservoir is where the insulin is stored. It must be refilled periodically to ensure a steady stream of insulin. Cannula: A small needle and straw-like tube inserted in the fatty tissue under the skin that delivers insulin. The needle is withdrawn while the tube remains. You must switch out the cannula and its site periodically to reduce infection risk. Operating buttons: These buttons allow for programmed insulin delivery throughout the day and for programmed bolus dose delivery at mealtime. Tubing: Thin, flexible plastic transports insulin from the pump to the cannula. For some people, wearing an insulin pump provides more flexibility to administer insulin doses on the go without the need to carry many diabetic supplies. It also allows for a more fine-tuned dosing of basal insulin and possibly less structure around mealtime. Insulin pumps have two dose types. The first is basal rate, which is a continuous infusion that delivers a small amount of insulin throughout the day. This insulin helps keep your blood sugar levels stable between meals and at night. The other, called a bolus d Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Insulin Pumps

What You Should Know About Insulin Pumps

Insulin pump therapy has come a long way since the first backpack-size pump became available in 1974. Today's pumps are much smaller -- more like a cell phone or pager -- and easier to use. Check out whether this generation of "smart pumps" will give you the flexibility you are looking for. How the Pumps Work These battery-operated devices are designed to mimic a properly functioning pancreas -- secreting insulin whether or not you're eating. Pumps use rapid-acting insulin and deliver constant amounts of insulin every few minutes -- the basal dose. This insulin covers the rise of blood glucose between meals. To compensate for mealtime blood glucose rise, you require a larger burst of insulin -- bolus doses. You'll make decisions before you eat about how much bolus insulin to program in and whether you want it all immediately or over the next few hours. Most pumps will help you make the dose determination based on your meal and your current blood glucose. Correction dosing, a form of bolus dosing, can also bring down high blood glucose levels and reverse correction dosing, used when taking mealtime boluses, can help compensate for low blood glucose. {C} Choosing a Pump Whether you decide an insulin pump is the way you prefer to take insulin or you want to update the one you're currently using, ask yourself these questions before buying: 1. How good is your vision? If your sight is impaired, look for an insulin pump with big numbers or vibration and sound components. The Roche Accu-Chek Spirit allows you to reconfigure the screen when you wear the pump upside down. 2. Are you tech savvy? If you like advanced computer features, you might research pumps that work in combination with an optional continuous glucose monitor (CGM). To date the Medtronic pump is the only one wit Continue reading >>

Tips And Tools For Insulin Pump Use

Tips And Tools For Insulin Pump Use

Insulin pumps can be great tools for managing diabetes in people of all ages, including children, teens, and even infants. Because pumps constantly deliver a low level of “background” insulin, and larger doses need only be taken before meals (or to “correct” unexpected high blood glucose), they can allow a user greater flexibility with respect to meal schedules and food choices than conventional insulin injections. Pumps also deliver more precise amounts of insulin than can be measured with a syringe. And modern pump technology tracks how much insulin has been delivered, when it was delivered, and how much of it is still active in the body, so there’s less of a chance of taking too much and ending up with low blood glucose (hypoglycemia). (Click here for a list of insulin pumps that are currently on the market.) Clearly, all of these characteristics can help a person achieve optimal blood glucose control. However, an insulin pump is only a tool: It can’t think for itself, and it is therefore only as “smart” as the person who is using it. In the hands of a motivated, diligent user, a pump can be a very helpful and precise tool. In the hands of a user who expects the pump to do the work for him, however, it may help to control blood glucose levels no better than any other method of insulin delivery. Even with a pump, it’s still necessary to count the carbohydrates in meals and snacks, match insulin doses to the foods being eaten, monitor blood glucose levels frequently, and make adjustments to meals, exercise, or insulin doses based on monitoring results. Everyone who uses a pump should receive comprehensive training on how to use it. But no matter how much training you receive or how many instruction manuals you read, some issues don’t become apparent Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pump Therapy

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pump Therapy

I am a Certified Pump Trainer (CPT) for all 5 pumps currently available on the market. I have been doing insulin pump therapy trainings for almost 2 years now. The number of patients using insulin pumps is growing rapidly. If the patient is motivated and willing to take on some additional responsibility for their diabetes care, an insulin pump could be a useful option. I do insulin pump demos and patients usually chose between 2 or 3 of the 5 pumps. I realize this is a big personal decision to make, and of course insulin pump therapy is not the right decision for everyone. Patients should select a pump that would best suit their lifestyle and easiest for them to use. The physician should not be the one choosing their pump. How does it work? Once the patient makes a choice, the insurance verification is started with the pump company and they get in touch with the patient. I have no contact with them until the patient receives the pump and calls me to schedule the training. I then provide instructions prior to the training. I think it is very important that patients request to be educated by a Certified Diabetes Educator who specializes on Insulin pump therapy. Please note that the Eisenhower Diabetes Program does not sell or promote any particular pump. How Insulin Pump Therapy Works Insulin Pumps are small devices that are battery operated or charged with a cable just like you would charge a cell phone. Insulin pump therapy consists of a pump, a reservoir, an infusion set which is a catheter that is inserted in the fat under the skin in the abdominal area, the tight, or arms. The site needs to be changed every two-three days. The reservoir t is filled with the amount of rapid-acting insulin needed for 2-3 days. The plastic tubing that is primed with insulin connects the Continue reading >>

Starting Insulin Pump Therapy: 8 Frequently Asked Questions

Starting Insulin Pump Therapy: 8 Frequently Asked Questions

Certified Diabetes Educator pumper for 25 years, and person with type 1 diabetes for over 42 years, Dawna Sanchez, has trained many patients (including me!) on insulin pump therapy, and there have been some common themes that surface when she starts training. Today, Dawna is sharing her knowledge and experience with you, as both a patient and a professional, in addressing eight commonly asked questions. Question #1: Will it Hurt? Well, that depends. I generally have to say no, but everybody is different. Different infusion sets go in differently, and everybody has different pain thresholds. So, it just depends…on where you put it, how lean you are, how sensitive you are, how hard you push, etc. If I say it won’t hurt, it invariably does. If I say it might hurt a little bit, it invariably doesn’t. But almost everyone agrees, it hurts way less than taking 4 to 5 shots a day, and a lot less than sticking your fingers to check your blood sugars, that’s for sure! Question #2: Will I Need Surgery? No! The pump has a little plastic piece called a “cannula” that you insert into your belly, thigh, or upper buttocks areas that you will learn to change out yourself every two to three days. The cannula delivers insulin under your skin so you don’t have to take insulin shots anymore. You don’t have any surgery for this to happen, only a little training to learn how to do it all. Question #3: Can I Take The Pump Off? Yes, you can suspend and disconnect your pump and tubing from your infusion site with a simple pinch and turn (in most cases). However, you should never interrupt or stop the insulin delivery on your pump for more than an hour or so, unless you have a backup plan. When disconnecting, be sure to suspend your pump so that insulin isn’t delivered while the Continue reading >>

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

How To Lose Weight When You Live With Diabetes

Losing weight can be difficult for anyone, and living with diabetes definitely doesn’t make it easier. However, there ARE people who set out to lose weight and end up so extraordinarily successful that you wonder if they have some inside information you don’t. That information EXISTS. I’m here to give you the rundown on how to successfully lose weight when you live with diabetes. In this post, I will go through: How to set realistic goals How many calories to eat How much protein, carbs, and fat to eat How much to exercise How blood glucose control affects your weight Without further ado…lets GET TO IT! Temper expectations at the start People these days have this intensive need for instant gratification. They want that 15 lbs gone by yesterday! While I’m all for efficiency, I’m going to be short and sweet and show reality with a pop quiz: True or false: it took more than a week to gain the weight you are trying to lose. The answer is undeniably “True”. So if it took you X number of months to gain weight, why would it take you a week or two to lose it? It doesn’t. It takes time and some concerted effort. Don’t expect to lose all of the weight immediately, but know that with proper habit formation and consistency, you WILL see the results you are after. The general rule for healthy weight loss is to aim for A MAX of 1-2 lbs. per week. It’s also quite common for people living with diabetes to take as long as 2-3 weeks before seeing any weight loss at all on a new diet. “Why?” you ask. Changing caloric intake and workout routines may require a reduction of insulin (or other diabetes medication) as well as diet manipulation, which takes a little trial and error to adjust. BE PATIENT. Once the ball is rolling, a slow and controlled weight loss makes Continue reading >>

Ten Years With My Insulin Pump

Ten Years With My Insulin Pump

Photo:� portrait showing pump.� Caption:� Joanna Stottler Retired nurse Joanna Stottler has had type 1, insulin dependent diabetes for 52 years.� A veteran of both sides of diabetes care, she has also, for the last 10 years, been using an insulin pump, instead of a syringe, to supply the insulin she must have.� Here she shares with us some observations on the insulin pump. "My doctor suggested I try the pump (he tried for eight years!), but at first I didn't like the idea of its catheter--I didn't want to be connected up to a machine! Also, I didn't know any other diabetics.� But I finally came around to his point of view.� So what did it? I was a nurse in a hospital diabetic unit then, and a person came in from MiniMed (an insulin pump manufacturer) to talk to us nurses about the pump.� And at that time I thought, well, gee, this sounds like a pretty good thing. But, like I say, it took me eight years to decide that was what I wanted to do.� My doctor was the one who put the idea into my head, but I really didn't connect with it until I met the MiniMed representative through my work. When I made the decision to try the pump, 10 years ago, I was taking approximately three to four shots a day, and my blood sugars were not doing well.� Every time I went to the doctor, he would change my sliding scale.� I tried-- but it just seemed like I couldn't figure out how to get my blood sugars even.� It was just up and down all the time, with A1c's of 8 or 9.�� And I was still feeling ok, but I just couldn't get the tight control that would be good for a diabetic.� That has changed now. Back when I started, I felt like the pump was some kind of secret thing.� I tried to find diabetics who were using a pump, and I couldn't find them.� When I did fin Continue reading >>

"i Would Never Want An Insulin Pump" - Inputdiabetesinputdiabetes

This advertisement generates revenue which helps to pay INPUT's running costs. It is not a product endorsement. This page has personal stories of people who used to say I would never want an insulin pump but changed their minds. If youd like us to publish your story, please click here . March 2017 Amber Rose (@diabetes_geek) tweeted a link to this blog post Busting Misconceptions About Insulin Pumps April 2015 Mary, 66, who has had type 1 diabetes for 38 years and has been using a pump for 4 years, told us the following: Having to insert the cannula, being connected all the time. Went on a course about counting carbs and insulin doses. Pump was discussed and I decided to put myself forward. What would you say to someone who hates pumps for the same reason you used to? It improves your control giving you the ability to manage your diabetes better. You can basically eat whatever you want and whenever you want, even not eating. Trust the pump. It is not heavy or cumbersome and you get used to it. It is very difficult to accidentally knock or disconnect it. You can disconnect for up to an hour if you want to go swimming or be intimate. Go for it, you will love the freedom from injections. I have had better support from the diabetes team as there is a special clinic for pump users and education sessions. I struggled for a long time adjusting the basal dose but my specialist nurse rang me weekly to offer support. My HbA1c is 7 and I am far healthier than before the pump. Some of the complications of diabetes have improved dramatically due I assume to a much more normal and stable blood glucose level. Life is good. No more having to inject in public. I believe that the NHS investing in more pumps would save millions over a diabetic lifetime. I am disappointed however that con Continue reading >>

Eat What You Want And Cover With Insulin

Eat What You Want And Cover With Insulin

D.D. Family type 1 LADA new pumper via MM-522 Puting aside the fact I think this is unwise for even non diabetics should eat healthy and in moderation.. Is there anyone here who can actually do this? Do you still keep a tight controll? Overall I've had excellent results on MDI some bumps but overall great. However I still have to be careful on my carbs. Like if I so much as look at milk I spike 100 points forget drinking it, I haven't figured out how to do food from a particular chinese place or pizza joints with out a large spike or even a large drop. I need to spread out certain proteins or they give me issues. I like my fasting numbers to be in the 80-90 range and I really aim for post meal to be under 140. Just relying on my insulin alone to do this just doesn't seem to work.. Am I missing something? D.D. Family T1 for 72 years, here to help Deanna, eating whatever you want and covering with insulin can lead to weight gain. I need to lose 31 pounds so I cannot do that. I limit myself to an average of 130 carbs per day so I will not gain weight. I hope you use carb counting, I think you do. Some people use a sliding scale and that can result in spikes and hypos that can usually be avoided with carb counting. I eat pizza about 4 times per year. I go to Pizza Hut since they are listed in the Calorie King and I therefore know exactly how many carbs are in what I eat. I choose the thin crust pizza and have three slices for my meal along with a salad. I take the rest of the pizza home and repeat the meal the next day at home. I do not have spikes doing it this way. If I ate thick crust I think I would have a spike. If I eat Chinese I choose a place that is in the Calorie King, if possible. Type 1 for 72 years. Using the MM 630g pump, and Dexcom G5. A1c=6.1 Like Richard s Continue reading >>

Does The Pump Make You Gain Weight?

Does The Pump Make You Gain Weight?

I havent gained any weight from pumping. Still as underweight as ever, despite getting older. If you want to gain weight without increasing carbs, Dr Bernstein recommends increasing protein, he tried increasing fats an extra 500 calories a day, but it didnt gain weight for his patients. Oh goodness lol. Well, as a pen user for the past 7 years, I would say dont do it of course its up to you! I did really bad on the pens. Id accidental leave my pen at home. And sometimes I just wouldnt eat, just so I didnt have to inject. Or, I was hungry and would eat, then realize I didnt have my pen with me. Of course, my blood sugar would go sky high. If you decide to go on the pens, I sure hope you do a better job at it! Haha I didnt mean for it to sound like I am going to gain weight this time around. My body has been through hell and back since I last used the pump. I went through complete organ failure, 2 years ago. And now my body is just messed up. Im a healthy weight. I am a very active person. A coworker of mine put it into my head that I will gain a lot of weight, and now its stuck in my head. A lots changed since 2008, when I last used the pump. Whether its the fact that Im 25 now, not 17, or the fact that Ive had a child, organ failure, etc. Ive let diabetes take over my life. Its put me through a depression. It just sucks. I think too much about crap. Funny how different circumstances change everything. I had been on R/NPH for 20 years before finally finally FINALLY getting a referral to a real endocrinologist (at Joslin) who took one look at what I was doing and switched me to Lantus/Novolog MDI. It was like being released from prison. Being able to skip a meal, or eat a late lunch if I had a meeting or whatever, after two decades of Eat Now Or Die! was incredibly liber Continue reading >>

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