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Can You Eat Salted Peanuts If You Have Diabetes?

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

Peanuts are packed with a variety of nutritious properties that may benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Eating peanuts and peanut products may help: promote weight loss lower the risk of cardiovascular disease control blood sugar prevent people from developing diabetes in the first place However, peanuts also carry some potential risks. If you have type 2 diabetes, read on to learn more about the risks and benefits of eating peanuts. Adding peanuts and peanut butter to your diet may be beneficial, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. While not technically nuts, peanuts provide many of the same health benefits as tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, and pecans. Peanuts are also less expensive than most other nuts, which is great if you’re looking to save money but still want the nutritional rewards. Peanuts help control blood sugar If you have diabetes, you need to consider the glycemic content of the foods you eat. Glycemic content is based on how quickly your body converts carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar are given a higher value. Water, which has no effect on blood sugar, has a GI value of 0. Peanuts have a GI value of 13, which makes them a low GI food. According to an article in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating peanuts or peanut butter in the morning may help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Peanuts may also help lessen the insulin spike of higher GI foods when paired together. One reason that peanuts may help control blood sugar is because they contain a large amount of magnesium. A single serving of peanuts (about 28 peanuts) contains 12 percent of the daily recommended amount Continue reading >>

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Author Sidebar: I didn't really care that much for nuts (or seeds) as a snack. I preferred potato chips or pretzels; or, a piece of fruit such as an apple or some grapes. But, after I recovered from my coma and returned to work, I realized that I needed something healthier than potato chips for a snack. :-) I started with salted, roasted peanuts; but, after doing some research, I discovered that roasted nuts tended not to be healthy because the heat caused damaged to the healthy fats within the nuts. In addition, I discovered that peanuts were one of the least healthy nuts. So, I gradually transitioned to raw nuts (no salt, not roasted), mainly almonds, pecans and walnuts; and, sometimes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Beyond helping with blood pressure, cholesterol, weight gain, and other health issues, there are 4 major problems that nuts and seeds help address to have them quality as super fats that help reverse your diabetes. 1. Healthy Snacks: is key to help diabetics maintain proper glucose control, especially between major meals. Eating nuts and seeds make it a lot easier to prepare quick and healthy snacks. 2. Healthy Fats: is one of the areas where many diabetics are lacking from a nutrient content perspective. Nuts and seeds provide monounsaturated fats, oleic acid and Omega-3 fats to help address inflammation, oxidation, weight gain, blood glucose levels and insulin levels. 3. Cravings: is a problem area that nuts and seeds can help with because of their macronutrient and micronutrient content, especially the fat, protein and minerals. 4. Eating Fruits: can be better tolerated when eaten with a handful of nuts and seeds. Why? Because the protein and fat in the nuts and seeds offset the carbs in the fruit. Nuts and Seed | Reverse Diabetes| Othe Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

Eating Nuts Such As Peanuts Improves Diabetes Control Without Weight Gain

Eating Nuts Such As Peanuts Improves Diabetes Control Without Weight Gain

ALBANY, Ga., Aug. 5, 2011 /PRNewswire/ -- An important new study released in the August issue of Diabetes Care shows that replacing carbohydrates with two ounces of nuts, such as peanuts, everyday improves blood glucose control and blood lipids in people with type 2 diabetes. David Jenkins, MD, PhD, DSc, Principal Investigator and a pioneer in the area of glycemic control for diabetics said, "Nuts, including peanuts, can make a valuable contribution to the diabetic diet by displacing high glycemic index carbohydrates and replacing them with vegetable fats and vegetable proteins which have been shown in the long term to be associated with better cardiovascular health and diabetes prevention." Peanuts have more protein than any other nut and are a source of mono and polyunsaturated oils. The paper reports that, "increased proportions of fat and protein, especially of plant origin, may confer metabolic benefits and reduce the risk of developing coronary heart disease and diabetes." The study, "Nuts as a Replacement for Carbohydrates in the Diabetic Diet", was conducted at the University of Toronto. During the study, 117 men and women with type 2 diabetes were randomized into three groups where they received either a full portion of mixed nuts including peanuts, a half portion of both nuts and muffins, or a full portion of muffins. The muffins were made of healthy whole wheat with protein from egg and skim milk powder. Participants' fasting blood glucose were tested every other week. After three months, participants receiving the full portion of nuts showed the biggest decrease in glycated hemoglobin (HgA1c), a measure of blood glucose control. The difference was significantly more than the decrease shown in the participants receiving the half portion of nuts and muffins, a Continue reading >>

Are Peanuts Safe For Diabetes?

Are Peanuts Safe For Diabetes?

Peanuts are a common snack in the diet of an average American. It is consumed in various ways, such as in the form of candy bars, peanut butter, or simply by roasting it. But if you have diabetes, you might be wondering if peanuts are safe for you to eat. As you know, people with diabetes should carefully choose the food that they eat. Unsalted Peanuts Unsalted peanuts can be a safe snack for those with diabetes. There have been a lot of studies that suggest nuts, as a whole, are good for one’s health. According to experts, peanuts are filled with so much nutrients and are rich in healthy substances, like the following: • Healthful fats • Vegetable protein • Fiber • Minerals • Antioxidants Several studies have linked eating peanuts to lowering the risk of heart diseases, including gallstones. Nuts can even help in lowering cholesterol, high blood pressure, as well as inflammation. Glycemic Index of Peanuts As you may already know, foods that have lower GI scale are converted to sugar steadily and slowly. On the other hand, foods that have high GI could release glucose fast into the bloodstream. According to medical studies, peanuts have a GI of 13. Such number is so low and this means that peanuts will only trigger a less spike in your blood sugar level, when compared to other foods. Peanuts are also said to only have a glycemic load of 1 and this means that after they are digested fully, they will not add too much sugar in your blood. This also means that peanuts can be considered a great snack even if you have diabetes. Are Peanuts Healthy for Diabetics? According to medical studies, peanuts are a nutrient enrich food and are rich in fats and proteins. Furthermore, they are a great source of magnesium, vitamin C, phosphorous and B-vitamins. Since peanuts h Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Can Salted Peanuts Make My Blood Sugar Rise?

Can Salted Peanuts Make My Blood Sugar Rise?

Can Salted Peanuts Make My Blood Sugar Rise? Aglaee Jacob is a registered dietitian. She has experience working with people who have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity issues. Jacob obtained a bachelor of science and a master of science, both in nutrition, from Laval University in Quebec City, Canada. A close-up of a large amount of salted peanuts.Photo Credit: Hederikwow/iStock/Getty Images Although peanuts are often categorized as nuts, they belong to the legume family. Peanuts can be eaten roasted in their shells, in peanut butter or roasted in oil and seasoned. Try to stick with dry-roasted peanuts to avoid peanuts that contain extra fats and choose peanuts that are free of the harmful trans fat. If you watch your blood sugar levels, a small serving of salted peanuts shouldn't raise your blood sugar levels, but a large serving could. Peanuts have a nutritional value that resembles that of most nuts, which mainly contain protein and fats. For example, 1 oz. of salted peanuts, which is the equivalent of a small handful, provides about 168 calories, 4.9 g of protein, 14.6 g of fat, 7.2 g of carbs, 2.6 g of fiber and 1.3 g of sugar, according to the USDA National Nutrient Database. If you have 1 cup of salted peanuts, you could consume about 814 calories, 23.7 g of protein, 70.5 g of fat, 34.7 g of carbohydrates, 12.3 g of fiber and 6.4 g of sugar. After your eat, your blood sugar levels will raise, especially if your meal contained carbohydrates. While protein and fat do not impact your blood sugar levels, carbohydrates are broken down into glucose, or sugar, and may elevate your blood sugar levels quickly. If you do not have diabetes, your body will be able to respond properly and prevent your blood sugar levels from rising too high by secreti Continue reading >>

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Peanuts Help Control Blood Sugar

Disease Prevention Glycemic index is a point scale used to compare how high your blood sugar and insulin spike after eating the same amount of carbohydrates from different foods. Foods that are digested more slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. The GI content of foods is measured on a 100-point scale, with 100 being the highest GI foods. Peanuts have a GI of 14 making them a low GI food (Jenkins, 1981). Glycemic load also measures blood sugar spikes, but uses the typical serving size of each food item instead of a standard carbohydrate amount, making it an even better tool to show how different foods eaten can affect blood sugar (Salmeron, 1997). Foods with a higher GI and GL can cause blood sugar and insulin to spike soon after eating, followed by a drop in blood sugar to levels lower than before consumption. This crash in blood sugar can make a person feel tired and hungry for more food, and the rollercoaster cycle of highs and lows can contribute to the development of pre-diabetes and diabetes (Jenkins, 1981). In addition, low-GI diets can significantly improve long-term glucose control in people with diabetes, similar to the amounts achieved with medication (Ajala, 2013). Peanuts and peanut butter are both low GI and GL foods, due to their content of healthy oils, protein, and fiber that have a positive effect on blood sugar control. Research has shown that peanuts can help control blood sugar in both healthy individuals and those with type 2 diabetes (Kirkmeyer, 2000 and Jenkins, 2011). Peanuts and peanut butter have even been shown to help lessen the spike in blood sugar when paired with high carbohydrate or high GL foods (Johnston, 2005). Snacking on peanuts can help to maintain blood sugar in between meals. One study showed t Continue reading >>

Are Peanuts Healthy?

Are Peanuts Healthy?

Im sure youll agree with me when I say, nuts are super healthy. But wait up are peanuts healthy? Perhaps itsonly a problem when you eat too many, right? Well, lets back up a little and define peanuts first of all. NEW VISITOR BONUS: Download a Free GuideHow To Lose Weight Fast in 3 Simple Steps (Based on Science). Follow these steps to lose 10 pounds in a week As you probably know,peanutsarent actually nuts, they arepulses belonging in the legume family, along with peas, beans, lentils and soybeans. And, theygrow under the ground, too, not on trees. They are a greatsource of protein for a plant food, and a good source of vitamins and minerals, like biotin, copper, folate, vitamin E, thiamin, and magnesium. But, although they are different to nuts like almonds and Brazil nuts etc., do they still have the same health benefits their counterpartsare renowned for having? One of the biggest nutritional myths of all times is that eating foods high in fat will make you fat. As a result, people are often fearful of nuts. While its true that peanuts are high in fat mostly monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, but also some saturated fat studies suggest this does not appear to contribute to weight gain. In well-controlled trials, no change in body weight was observed in the participants. But, lets look more specificallyat some of the research. Onestudy found that when peanuts were added to the diet everyday for 8 weeks, the peanut group naturally compensated for this energy increase in their overall dietary intake. Despite being energy dense, peanuts have a high satiety value and chronic ingestion evokes strong dietary compensation and little change in energy balance. 2. Reduced Energy Intake At Subsequent Meals One study compared peanuts topotato chips, and f Continue reading >>

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

If you have diabetes, beware of peanuts, peanut butter, and peanut oil. Some people think that because most tree nuts, like almonds, are so healthy, that peanuts should also be good for us. But peanuts aren’t nuts at all. They are a legume, and unlike most nuts we can’t eat them raw because they are sometimes covered with a dangerous fungus. Actually, we can’t eat them at all if we want to avoid some of the side effects that we can get from them. Some of these side effects can be quite serious. I can think of only nine reasons why we have to avoid peanuts or anything made from them. Maybe you can think of more, but these eight might be enough to give anyone pause: 1. Peanuts have a lot of carbohydrates, which raise our blood sugar level. Take a look at the US Department of Agriculture’s [National Nutrient Database](which is the gold standard of nutrient facts. "One tablespoon of natural, unsweetened peanut butter contains 3 grams of carbohydrate and will raise my blood sugar 15 mg/dl," writes Dr. Richard K. Bernstein in the 2011 edition of his book Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. "Imagine the effect on blood sugar of downing 10 tablespoons!" 2. Peanuts are the source of one of the most common food allergies. "They have the potential to provoke acute allergic reactions (e.g., hives or anaphylaxis) that can be dangerous in the susceptible, even fatal in rare instances," writes Dr. William Davis in his 2011 book, Wheat Belly. Many schools will no longer let children bring peanut butter products to school. 3. Peanuts "contain lectins and other anti-nutrients that can adversely affect your health, particularly if you are suffering from an autoimmune disorder," writes Loren Cordain in his 2002 book, The Paleo Diet. These lectins "are known to increase intestinal Continue reading >>

Are Salted Peanuts Allowed?

Are Salted Peanuts Allowed?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community i have type 2 diabetes. i love salted peanuts, but once i start i cannot stop eating them. they lower my blood sugar, are they good for diabetics or not? Well they are a bit high in salt, but I do eat some now and again as a snack. I am careful to put a small potion in a bowl though, as you say they are very more-ish, I'd demolish the whole bag if I sat in front of the TV with it! If they work for you and don't cause any bg issues, stick with them! Still may need not to get too carried away and eat loads If you buy red skin peanuts from the supermarket, you can roast them yourself. 200C for 15 mins. They dont really need salt. Alternatively, take them out after 10-12 mins and mix them in a bowl with some kind of chilli/garlic sauce and whack them back in for 5-10 mins. You have to keep an eye on them as once they are overdone, they are inedible. I;ve been doing that for years. Its much cheaper and healthier than buying the salted ones. Salted peanuts are one of my staple snacks - carbs are fine (0.6g carbs per 50g) Tent. peanuts are very high carb and technally they are not a nut they are a legume which i think is a type of beanI used to think they lowered bloods aswell. check bgs after three hhours u might get a hell of a shock. the reason thry lower bgs first is bcause of the fat con I have never found that to be the case. They dont increase my levels at all. Tent. peanuts are very high carb and technally they are not a nut they are a legume which i think is a type of beanI used to think they lowered bloods aswell. check bgs after three hhours u might get a hell of a shock. the reason thry lower bgs first is bcause of the fat con Peanuts are not adv Continue reading >>

Are Peanuts Good For Diabetes? Effect On Disease Risk

Are Peanuts Good For Diabetes? Effect On Disease Risk

Peanuts are common in the average American diet in the form of peanut butter, candy bars, and roasted and salted peanuts. But how may eating peanuts affect people with diabetes? People with diabetes have to carefully consider their diet. As a result, many of those with the disease wonder if peanuts are fine to eat. This article explores a few things that people with diabetes should be aware of before making the decision to eat peanuts. Are nuts good for people with diabetes? There is a lot of evidence that suggests nuts, on the whole, are good for the health. According to a study posted in Nutrients, nuts and peanuts are full of nutrients. They are often also rich in healthful substances such as: Studies have linked eating nuts to a lower risk of certain heart diseases and gallstones. They may even help with high blood pressure, cholesterol, and inflammation. While nuts are high in fat and calories, the research suggests that they may even help with weight loss. From this point of view, they are a much healthier option than other snacks, such as a bag of chips. There are some other factors to consider as well, with peanuts specifically. Glycemic index of peanuts The glycemic index (GI) is used to rate foods based on how slow or fast they cause an increase in blood sugar. Foods lower on the GI scale tend to be converted to sugar slowly and steadily. High GI foods release glucose quickly into the bloodstream. People with diabetes are usually more aware of these numbers. They can inform the person if and when they need to take insulin, and what and when they can eat. The GI scale goes from 0-100. Something with a score of 0 would be anything which has no effect on blood sugar, such as water. A score of 100 is pure glucose. The other common measurement is the glycemic load, Continue reading >>

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

When you’re looking for a satisfying diabetes-friendly snack, it’s hard to beat nuts. “Nuts are a super snack food for people with diabetes because they’re the total package — low in carbs and high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat — and they create a feeling of fullness,” says Cheryl Mussatto, RD, founder of Eat Well to Be Well in Osage City, Kansas. Nuts: A Good Choice for Diabetes and Your Heart The healthy fat in nuts protects your ticker, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. That’s important because people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those without it, according to the American Heart Association. Heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, Mussatto says. “At the same time, nuts also raise levels of ‘good,’ or HDL, cholesterol,” she says. “This cholesterol acts sort of like a sanitation worker, removing cholesterol from the tissues for disposal, which prevents plaque buildup in the arteries.” What’s more, nuts help regulate blood sugar, which makes them a better option to reach for than, say, pretzels, when afternoon hunger strikes, Mussatto says. Many kinds of nuts have this effect: Almonds have been shown to slow down the blood sugar response when eaten with carbohydrate-rich foods, according to a small study published in the journal Metabolism that focused on healthy people without the disease. A study published in March 2011 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found similar results for pistachios when eaten by healthy volunteers. For those people already diagnosed with diabetes, regularly eating tree nuts can also improve blood sugar management, Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Peanuts?

Can Diabetics Eat Peanuts?

Peanuts are a popular American snack food, and if you have diabetes you may wonder if you can also enjoy this nutritious favorite. While concerns about the impact of nuts on your weight and blood sugars may stop you in your tracks, there is good news. Peanuts, a groundnut from the legume family, and other tree nuts are linked to a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, a common complication of diabetes. In addition, peanuts have properties that can actually help with appetite control and weight management, and peanuts in moderation do not worsen blood glucose control. Video of the Day A handful of nuts -- about 1 ounce -- contains 160 calories and has the same amount of protein as an ounce of meat or chicken, while also providing 2 grams of fiber and only 5 grams of carbohydrates. Peanuts have a glycemic index of 13 and a glycemic load of 1 -- both very low -- which means the carbohydrates in peanuts trigger less of a blood sugar spike compared to other foods with the same amount of carbohydrates. Peanuts are also nutrient-rich, as they contain heart healthy unsaturated fats, and are a good source of vitamin E, folate, niacin and the minerals phosphorus, magnesium, manganese and copper. Peanuts are also rich in phytochemicals -- substances with properties known to promote health and offer protection from chronic disease. According to the American Heart Association, adults with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke compared to adults without diabetes. Consuming peanuts may help lower this risk. Research featured in the May 2015 issue of "JAMA Internal Medicine" followed over 200,000 people for at least 5 years, comparing peanut and tree nut consumption in adults to death rates. Researchers found that U.S. study participants eating peanut Continue reading >>

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