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Can You Eat Oysters With Diabetes?

Raw Oysters Are Dangerous? - Diabetes

Raw Oysters Are Dangerous? - Diabetes

I'm 23, I've been T1 for a year and a half now and I love oysters. I sent my mom a snapchat from an oyster bar last night and this morning she sent me messages voicing her concerns and included the following copy/paste paragraph from google: The FDA also recommends that you avoid eating raw oysters or clams -- diabetics are more susceptible to infection from the Vibrio vulnificus bacteria that is sometimes found in raw shellfish. Undetectable by taste or smell, the bacteria can cause severe illness and even death.Jan 20, 2016 I had never heard about this before and everything I can find through web searches basically just says "avoid raw oysters because your immune system is broken so you could get sick easier" but couldn't that be said for a lot of things? Like going outside in the cold or being around lots of people during flu season? Do you all make sure to avoid raw oysters and clams? How serious is this threat? Are there other foods I should be avoiding as well? This is just pretty new to me and I'm curious how seriously my fellow diabetics take recommendations like this. Continue reading >>

The Risk Of Eating Raw Oysters & Clams

The Risk Of Eating Raw Oysters & Clams

Advice for persons with liver disease, diabetes, or weakened immune systems... Each year, millions of Americans enjoy eating raw molluscan shellfish -- especially oysters and clams. But if you have a liver disease, diabetes, or a weak immune system, raw oysters or clams containing the bacteria Vibrio vulnificus can make you seriously ill. a.. Eating only oysters or clams that have been thoroughly cooked. b.. Eating raw oysters or clams only if they are treated and labeled "Processed to reduce Vibrio vulnificus to non-detectable levels." Vibrio vulnificus is a bacteria that can cause sever illness or death to at-risk people who eat raw oysters or clams. From 1989 to 2000, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recorded 282 serious illnesses associated with consumption of raw oysters and clams containing the Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. While illnesses are infrequent, about half (149) have resulted in death. Vibrio vulnificus is found naturally in warm coastal waters, such as the Gulf of Mexico, where levels of the bacteria are elevated during the summer months. Vibrio vulnificus is NOT a result of pollution, and can be found in waters approved for oyster and clam harvesting. Vibrio vulnificus does NOT change the appearance, taste, or odor of oysters or clams. You are at risk of serious illness if you eat raw oysters or clams and have any of these health conditions: a.. Liver disease (from hepatitis, cirrhosis, alcoholism, or cancer) b.. Iron overload disease (hemochromatosis) f.. Or any illness or medical treatment that weakens the body's immune system Healthy people are not at risk of serious infection. If you at risk, raw or undercooked oysters or clams containing Vibrio vulnificus can make you sick. You can also become infected if these bacteria enter your body t Continue reading >>

Raw Oyster Myths

Raw Oyster Myths

Raw oysters contaminated with Vibrio vulnificus can be life threatening, even fatal when eaten by someone with liver disease, diabetes or a weakened immune system. However, there are myths that encourage people to eat raw oysters in spite of these dangers. Some of these myths, and the true facts behind them, include: MYTH: Eating raw oysters are safe if you drown them in hot sauce, which kills everything. Fact: The active ingredients in hot sauce have no more effect on harmful bacteria than plain water. Nothing but prolonged exposure to heat at a high enough temperature will kill bacteria. MYTH: Avoid oysters from polluted waters and you'll be fine. Fact: Vibrio vulnificus in oysters has nothing to do with pollution. Rather these bacteria thrive naturally in warm coastal areas (such as the Gulf of Mexico) where oysters live. MYTH: An experienced oyster lover can tell a good oyster from a bad one. Fact: Vibrio vulnificus can't be seen, smelled, or even tasted. Don't rely on your senses to determine if an oyster is safe. Fact: Alcohol may impair your good judgment, but it doesn't destroy harmful bacteria. Fact: Roberta Hammond, Ph.D, the Food and Waterborne Disease Coordinator for Florida, cites a case where a fatality caused by Vibrio vulnificus occurred after eating only three oysters. The seriousness of any case depends on many factors, including how much bacteria is ingested and the person's underlying health conditions. MYTH: Avoid raw oysters in months without the letter "R" and you'll be safe. Fact: While presence of Vibrio vulnificus bacteria is higher in warmer months, according to the Department of Health and Human Service's Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), a full 40 percent of cases occur during colder months from September through April. MYTH Continue reading >>

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

How To Fight Type 2 Diabetes Through Your Food Choices And Diet Plan

If you have type 2 diabetes — the most common form of diabetes — eating a healthy, well-balanced diet is critical to controlling your weight, blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol. By enriching your diet and creating a meal plan tailored to your personal preferences and lifestyle, you'll be able to enjoy the foods you love while minimizing complications and reducing further risk. Although there isn’t any research that directly supports individual dietary choices in the fight against type 2 diabetes, it doesn’t hurt to maintain a balanced diet. More often than not, the average diet is lacking in these key nutrients: calcium magnesium fiber potassium vitamins A, C, D, and E vitamin B-12 for those on metformin Adding foods rich in these nutrients is often a great first step in diabetes management. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the following are considered to be diabetes superfoods: Fat-free milk and yogurt are both a good source of vitamin D, which promotes strong bones and teeth. Whole grains containing germ and bran are often rich in magnesium, chromium, and folate. Regardless of the type, berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and fiber. Citrus fruits, such as oranges, lemons, and limes, are high in vitamin C. Not only are beans high in fiber, they’re a solid source of potassium and magnesium. Omega-3 fatty acids may help reduce your risk of heart disease, so don’t shy away from salmon dishes. In addition to providing magnesium and fiber, nuts can help with hunger management. Some nuts and seeds also contain omega-3s. Tomatoes contain crucial nutrients such as vitamins C and E. Swap regular potatoes for sweet potatoes, which are chock-full of potassium and vitamin A. Dark green leafy vegetables like collards and kale a Continue reading >>

Smoked Oysters | Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

Smoked Oysters | Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

Transgressions: Ate oysters instead of fish, and 22 oz salad greens instead of maximum 14 oz Exercise: Four hours of barnyard chores: clearing brush, moving rocks, adjusting fences. My recent cheat day didnt seem to set me back, other than increasing temporarily my desire for more carbs. I tried the Morton Salt Substitute on my eggs this morning. Tastes fine. Even drank 8 fl oz of water containing one quarter teaspoon (1.2 g) of this potassium chloride product. Thats 610 mg potassium in one fell swoop. Regulators in the U.S. limit potassium in over-the-counter supplements to 99 mg. But remember the potential health benefits of high potassium diets are tied to fruit and vegetable consumptionmarkers of potassium intakerather than potassium supplements. My leg cramps could be related to deficiency of magnesium, calcium, or potassium. This is probably an issue with most very low-carb ketogenic diets. Easy enough to supplement, especially if you know that salt substitutes contain much more potassium than bottled potassium supplements. I found an example of carbs sneaking into food you might not suspect: ham. I bought some fully cooked cubed ham, water added, ground and formed. A two-ounce (56 g) serving has 3 g of carbohydrate: dextrose and modified food starch. Likemany processed meats, it also contained sodium nitrite, which might be good to avoid. Some studies linknitritesa preservative added toprocessed meatsto cancer. Others do not . Tracking nutrients in processed foods like this ham is also a little problematic. The food database at NutritionData has about 60 entries for ham. The closest product I found was pork, cured, ham and water product, slice, boneless, separable lean and fat, heated, roasted. Close enough. Smoked oysters were right next to the canned tuna on m Continue reading >>

Fresh Oysters | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Fresh Oysters | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I demolished 6 beautiful fresh oysters yesterday, thoroughly enjoyed them and then had a guilt feeling. Are they high in carbs? Have googled but got conflicting answers. Anyone know please? Hi, according to an app i have got, 1 medium oyster contains 8mg of cholesterol, 31mg sodium, 22.8mg potassium, 0.1g total carbohydrates, and 7 calories I suppose it all depends on what you had with it. To me, they don't seem *too* bad unless they're breaded. 6 fresh oysters cooked on a dry heat totals 4.3g of carbs. Edit: By the looks of it, the carb count varies massively between sources :shock: Anything that is/was alive doesn't contain many carbs Anything that is/was alive doesn't contain many carbs Plants are alive so that statement is not strictly true is it? I eat them with fresh lemon juice. Yum yum! Have enjoyed oysters kilpatrick in the dim and distant past. Certainly can't afford to eat them often and I think this was the first time in many years. Did enjoy though :thumbup: I can't imagine shell fish having much in the way of carbs. thus it's down to what you had with them. did you check your blood glucose? No. Don't do it at home as my doctor just it in the surgery every so often. No problems at all to date. I eat them with fresh lemon juice. Yum yum! Have enjoyed oysters kilpatrick in the dim and distant past. Certainly can't afford to eat them often and I think this was the first time in many years. Did enjoy though :thumbup: You are 'brave' and I am pleased you enjoyed them so much I have 'never' tried them as am too squeamish too do so ... Always avoided and declined any opportunity to try these . Are there any benefits to eating them with Diabetes? Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

Can watching my diet help me control my diabetes? Yes. The foods you choose and the timing of your meals can make a big difference in how well you manage your condition, so it's a good idea to work out a plan with your doctor and a dietitian. The main goal will be to avoid fluctuations in the level of sugar, or glucose, in your blood. You'll also need to keep your weight under control and hold down your levels of cholesterol and blood fats called triglycerides. Sticking to a good diet can help you do all of these things. Not entirely. It's true that sugar is absorbed into the blood quickly, and too much glucose hitting the bloodstream at once is hard on the body. But white sugar has been unfairly singled out. Researchers now know that other carbohydrates like white bread, white rice, and pasta can spike your blood sugar, too. The trick is to eat these foods along with some protein, fat, or fiber, so that the glucose is absorbed into the blood more slowly. Nutrient-rich foods like fruit are still preferable to cookies, but you needn't deprive yourself of sweets altogether as long as you have them with a meal and not alone (and include them in your total carbohydrate count for the day). Whole grains and other high-fiber foods, such as beans and many fruits and vegetables, are more nutritious than refined carbohydrates. What's more, they're filling -- so you feel satisfied after a meal based on them -- and they may reduce your level of LDL, or bad cholesterol. Those are good reasons to switch to whole wheat bread and brown rice. Try out different grains, like barley or kasha, and legumes like chickpeas. Crunchy fruits and veggies such as apples and carrots are good choices. As a person with diabetes, you're at a higher-than-average risk of cardiovascular disease. In fact, Continue reading >>

Oysters And Vibriosis

Oysters And Vibriosis

Raw oysters can ruin your summer. Thats because you can get very sick from eating raw oysters. Learn about vibriosis , a disease linked to raw oysters and how to protect your health when it comes to oysters and certain other shellfish. The days are growing longer and the temperature is rising. For many people, that means its the best time to enjoy their favorite seafood: oysters. It is also the time of year that most illnesses from raw oysters occur. Whenever and wherever you like to enjoy oysters, eating raw oysters and certain other undercooked shellfish, such as clams and mussels, can put you at risk for infections. One of the infections you might get from eating raw oysters is caused by some types of Vibrio, bacteria that occur naturally in coastal waters where oysters live. This bacteria can become concentrated in an oysters body because oysters function like a filter: they eat by constantly drawing in water, and materials in the waterincluding harmful bacteriaare retained within the oysters body. When someone eats raw or undercooked oysters that contain bacteria or exposes a wound to seawater that contains Vibrio, he or she can get an illness called vibriosis. Vibriosis causes about 80,000 illnesses and 100 deaths in the United States every year. Most of these illnesses happen from May through October when water temperatures are warmer. However, you can get sick from eating raw or undercooked oysters during any month of the year, and raw oysters from typically colder waters also can cause vibriosis. An oyster that contains harmful bacteria doesnt look, smell, or even taste different from any other oyster. The only way to kill harmful bacteria in oysters is to cook them properly. Tips for Cooking Oysters & Other Shellfish Before cooking, throw out any shellfish wi Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Pizza & Chinese Food?

Can A Diabetic Eat Pizza & Chinese Food?

A person with diabetes can eat anything, so you can certainly include pizza and Chinese food on your menu. This doesn’t mean you can eat either type of fare with abandon or without consideration of other foods on your menu for the day. Careful planning and balanced nutrition play vital roles in managing symptoms of diabetes. Video of the Day A balanced diet for a person with diabetes includes essentially the same foods you’d find on a nutritionally sound diet for anyone – a combination of complex carbohydrates, lean protein, fruits, vegetables and dairy. A healthy diet also includes healthy fats such as those found in olive oil, oily fish, almonds and walnuts. A good balance includes obtaining 40 to 60 percent of your daily carbohydrates from carbohydrates, 20 to 35 percent from protein and 20 to 35 percent from fat. To help manage diabetes, you should limit refined carbohydrates and mix your consumption of both refined and complex carbohydrates with other foods. Pizza crust usually includes a crust made from white flour, a refined carbohydrate. To avoid causing sudden spikes in your blood sugar levels, limit the amount of pizza you eat at any one time. Order thin crust pizza and opt for whole wheat pizza crust when available. Your choice of toppings also proves important in managing diabetes. Cheese, a good source of calcium, contains some sugar. Order a pizza with light cheese. You also need to manage your weight and cholesterol to control symptoms of diabetes. If you want a meat topping, chicken makes a better choice than pepperoni. And if you add a lot of vegetables – tomatoes, broccoli, mushrooms, green peppers, spinach – these complex carbohydrates will help balance out the refined carbohydrates in the pizza crust. The Glycemic Index, a system that rates Continue reading >>

Diabetics: Do You Eat Raw Oysters?

Diabetics: Do You Eat Raw Oysters?

MIGrandma Lives in the middle-of-the-mitten. I was just watching a food show on the Food Network channel and they were talking about raw oysters, and how diabetics shouldn't eat them. So I did a little research and discovered that raw oysters can have a bacteria called vibrio vulnificus and it can cause chills, fever, nausea, vomiting, etc. etc. and sometimes even death. When we were in New Orleans I got sick the first night, I was blaming the food I'd eaten at lunch....but after reading more about raw oysters and diabetics it said symptoms can occur 24-48 hours later. I can figure back and it was about 42 hours after I'd eaten four raw oysters that I started feeling sick so maybe my lunch that day wasn't the culprit. I have no way of knowing for sure, but I don't think I'll be eating any raw oysters from now on. Trouble is, they were good! Would love to eat them again, but I don't think it's worth it! So, if you're a diabetic do you eat raw oysters or avoid them? As another poster stated, at least with type 1, this type of illness is something to avoid at all costs. It causes havoc with their blood sugars and in fact can send these people to the hospital so they can get their blood sugar under control Very dangerous situation. I loved raw oysters. That is until one day, when I was working in a physicians office, I saw this poor girl who had eaten one of these little buggers. I have never seen someone that shade of blue/green/gray before in my life. Needless to say, I don't eat them anymore. There is a local story about this that posted today. A guy went fishing and they think he got this bacteria in a sore on his leg by the water of the bay splashing in the cut. (It can come from the eating raw oysters or the water infecting a cut) They said the fact he was a diabetic Continue reading >>

Reasons Not To Eat Raw Oysters...

Reasons Not To Eat Raw Oysters...

Friend Was badly pre diabetic, now mostly normal. Darrell Dishons vacation was supposed to be a dream come true a relaxing trip to Florida to hang out with some friends before getting married on a beach. Instead, Dishon was soon lying in a medically-induced coma in a Panama City hospital, while family members agonized over giving doctors consent to amputate both of the Lebanon residents legs in order to save his life. It was one of the most difficult decisions weve had to make, said Dishons daughter, Brittany Moore. But we knew we had to save his life. Dishon, 40, had contracted Vibrio vulnificus, a virulent strain of bacteria, most likely from eating raw oysters at a Panama City restaurant on July 26. As a diabetic, Dishon had a weakened immune system and was succeptible to the bacteria which caused an aggressive skin infection that was essentially eating his legs. I never liked raw oysters or any raw seafood now I have a good reason not to eat them. D.D. Family T2 - late Jan, 2009 Avandamet 500 mg twice daily Dang! One more thing I have to give up. I grew up on raw oysters and clams on the half shell. Continue reading >>

Shellfish May Raise Diabetes Risk: Study

Shellfish May Raise Diabetes Risk: Study

October 21, 2009 / 5:40 PM / 8 years ago NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Eating white and oily fish regularly may provide protection against type 2 diabetes, but eating shellfish may have the opposite effect, a study from the UK hints. The study team noted about 25 percent less risk type 2 diabetes among men and women who reported eating one or more, as opposed to fewer, servings of white or oily fish each week. Unexpectedly, however, they found that men and women who ate similar amounts of shellfish primarily prawns, crab, and mussels had about 36 percent increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. But it may not be the shellfish per se which increased the risk for diabetes, Dr. Nita Forouhi, of Addenbrookes Hospital, University of Cambridge, noted in an email to Reuters Health. Rather, the cooking and preparation methods used in the UK, for example, oils used when frying or butter- and mayonnaise-based sauces served with shellfish, may increase cholesterol intake which, in turn, may raise diabetes risk. Forouhi and colleagues assessed the weekly intake of shellfish plus white fish such as cod, haddock, sole, and halibut, or oily fish such as mackerel, kippers, tuna, and salmon, reported by 9,801 men and 12,183 women. The study participants were 40 to 79 years old at the time and had no history of diabetes. Over an average of 10 years, 725 of these men and women developed type 2 diabetes. Both the lower risk linked with white and oily fish and the greater risk tied to shellfish intake remained when the investigators allowed for a range of diabetes risk factors including physical activity, obesity, alcohol use, and fruit and vegetable intake. The investigators emphasize that the link between shellfish intake and diabetes risk requires further investigations in other popu Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

Food Safety: The Raw Truth

Food Safety: The Raw Truth

To many people, food safety is a ho-hum subjectsomething one doesnt think about until suddenly there are flu-like symptoms (nausea, diarrhea, fever, abdominal cramping, vomiting). Then its Oh, my gosh, what did I eat? and thinking back to try to find the culprit. One consequence of having diabetes is that it may leave you more susceptible to developing infectionssuch as those that can be brought on by disease-causing bacteria and other pathogens that cause foodborne illness. There are many sources of foodborne illness, including eating unwashed foods, using contaminated cutting boards and knives, and cooling food for too long on the counter before refrigerating. Some causes of foodborne illness may be less obvious, such as eating raw foods. Although using more unprocessed fruits and vegetables is encouraged, its important to be aware of raw foods that are more likely to cause illness. You may find salad recipes calling for garnishes of fresh (uncooked) alfalfa sprouts, and purchased sandwiches may contain raw sprouts. Or perhaps you like Asian dishes garnished with raw bean sprouts. Warning: These tiny sprouts can harbor mighty bacteria. So, to be safe, youll want to avoid eating raw sprouts of any kind (alfalfa, clover, radish, mung beans, etc.). Seeds and beans can become contaminated during harvesting, storage, or sprouting. They also need warm and humid conditions to sprout and growconditions that are also ideal for the growth of bacteria, including Salmonella, E. coli, and Listeria. Cook sprouts thoroughly before eating. While they wont be as crisp, any harmful bacteria will be killed. Some recipes call for raw or undercooked meats and poultry (especially the ground type) or seafood (oysters, sushi, ceviche). Or, when dining out, you may decide to try steak tartar Continue reading >>

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