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Can You Eat Nuts If You Have Diabetes?

If I Have Diabetes, What Quantity Of Nuts Should I Eat Daily?

If I Have Diabetes, What Quantity Of Nuts Should I Eat Daily?

If I have diabetes, what quantity of nuts should I eat daily? Nuts are very high in calories (150 to 200 per ounce for tree nuts and 105 calories per ounce for peanuts), so portion control is essential. One ounce a day of tree nuts ( cup), two ounces of peanuts or one tablespoon of peanut butter is the recommended amount for people with diabetes. Look for peanut butter with little salt, sugar or partially hydrogenated oil. Try buying nuts in the shell. It takes time to get at the nuts, so you will eat less. If you buy shelled nuts, stick with raw or dry-roasted and avoid the salted, oil-roasted, honey-coated or yogurt-covered varieties. Stored in a cool, dry place, nuts will stay fresh for several months. Keeping nuts in the refrigerator tightly tied in a plastic bag or in a jar will extend their life, and freezing nuts will keep them good for a year or longer. Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the bodys inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes ... is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease Continue reading >>

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

The Benefits And Risks Of Peanuts For People With Diabetes

Peanuts are packed with a variety of nutritious properties that may benefit people with type 2 diabetes. Eating peanuts and peanut products may help: promote weight loss lower the risk of cardiovascular disease control blood sugar prevent people from developing diabetes in the first place However, peanuts also carry some potential risks. If you have type 2 diabetes, read on to learn more about the risks and benefits of eating peanuts. Adding peanuts and peanut butter to your diet may be beneficial, especially if you have type 2 diabetes. While not technically nuts, peanuts provide many of the same health benefits as tree nuts, such as walnuts, almonds, and pecans. Peanuts are also less expensive than most other nuts, which is great if you’re looking to save money but still want the nutritional rewards. Peanuts help control blood sugar If you have diabetes, you need to consider the glycemic content of the foods you eat. Glycemic content is based on how quickly your body converts carbohydrates into glucose, or blood sugar. The glycemic index (GI) is a 100-point scale that rates foods on how rapidly they cause blood sugar to rise. Foods that cause a rapid rise in blood sugar are given a higher value. Water, which has no effect on blood sugar, has a GI value of 0. Peanuts have a GI value of 13, which makes them a low GI food. According to an article in the British Journal of Nutrition, eating peanuts or peanut butter in the morning may help control your blood sugar throughout the day. Peanuts may also help lessen the insulin spike of higher GI foods when paired together. One reason that peanuts may help control blood sugar is because they contain a large amount of magnesium. A single serving of peanuts (about 28 peanuts) contains 12 percent of the daily recommended amount Continue reading >>

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

The Best Nuts For Diabetes: Walnuts, Almonds, And More

When you’re looking for a satisfying diabetes-friendly snack, it’s hard to beat nuts. “Nuts are a super snack food for people with diabetes because they’re the total package — low in carbs and high in protein, fiber, and healthy fat — and they create a feeling of fullness,” says Cheryl Mussatto, RD, founder of Eat Well to Be Well in Osage City, Kansas. Nuts: A Good Choice for Diabetes and Your Heart The healthy fat in nuts protects your ticker, says Melissa Joy Dobbins, RDN, CDE, a spokesperson for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. That’s important because people with diabetes are 2 to 4 times more likely to die of heart disease than those without it, according to the American Heart Association. Heart-healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats found in nuts can lower your LDL, or “bad” cholesterol, Mussatto says. “At the same time, nuts also raise levels of ‘good,’ or HDL, cholesterol,” she says. “This cholesterol acts sort of like a sanitation worker, removing cholesterol from the tissues for disposal, which prevents plaque buildup in the arteries.” What’s more, nuts help regulate blood sugar, which makes them a better option to reach for than, say, pretzels, when afternoon hunger strikes, Mussatto says. Many kinds of nuts have this effect: Almonds have been shown to slow down the blood sugar response when eaten with carbohydrate-rich foods, according to a small study published in the journal Metabolism that focused on healthy people without the disease. A study published in March 2011 in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition found similar results for pistachios when eaten by healthy volunteers. For those people already diagnosed with diabetes, regularly eating tree nuts can also improve blood sugar management, Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Eating Just Two Servings Of Nuts A Day May Combat Type 2 Diabetes (but Peanuts Won't Help, Say Experts)

Eating Just Two Servings Of Nuts A Day May Combat Type 2 Diabetes (but Peanuts Won't Help, Say Experts)

Eating nuts may help to combat type 2 diabetes, new research suggest. Two servings of tree nuts a day appears to lower and stabilise blood sugar levels in people with the disease, according to evidence collected from 12 clinical trials. Tree nuts cover most types including walnuts, cashews, hazelnuts and pecans, but exclude peanuts. A single serving was defined as 30 grams. Nut consumption improved two key markers of blood sugar, the results from analysing data on 450 trial participants showed. One, the HbA1c test, measures blood sugar levels over three months. The other, the fasting glucose test, assesses blood sugar after the patient has not eaten for eight hours. The best results were seen when nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. A single serving of tree nuts was defined as about a quarter of a cup, or 30 grams. Participants in the clinical trials were given 56 grams of nuts a day on average. Dr John Sievenpiper from St Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, who led the study, said: ‘Tree nuts are another way people can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in the context of a healthy dietary pattern.’ While nuts are high in fat, it is of the healthier unsaturated variety. Although nuts can be high in calories, trial participants did not gain weight. Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Are you trying to prevent diabetes, lower your blood sugar levels, or just looking to understand the condition? Learn more about diabetes and check out this list of healthy snacks handpicked by our Health Nut and Registered Dietitian. Successfully managing diabetes is all about balancing blood sugar levels and maintaining or achieving a healthy weight. What is Diabetes? Diabetes (often referred to in the medical community as diabetes mellitus) is caused by the body's inability to produce any or enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone the converts sugar, a.k.a glucose, to energy. Without adequate levels of insulin, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead of being delivered to cells to use as energy. This glucose build-up leads to high blood sugar, which triggers the signs and symptoms of diabetes. What is the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) is characterized by a complete lack of insulin. This type of diabetes only accounts for about 5% of people who have diabetes, and is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. In Type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys pancreatic cells that are required to produce insulin. Blood sugar levels rise without insulin to convert glucose to energy. Type 2 diabetes (also referred to as adult-onset diabetes) is the most common form of diabetes. Affecting 95% of people with diabetes, type 2 is usually detected in adulthood, although children can also develop it. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not effectively use insulin, a condition known as insulin resistance. Initially, the pancreas responds by making more insulin to compensate, but over time, it produces less and less. This results in insulin deficiency because the body can't make enough insulin to keep bl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes

Nuts And Diabetes

Tweet Nuts provide a number of benefits for people with diabetes. Studies suggest that nuts may even decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. A study published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition found that "nut consumption was associated with a decreased prevalence of selected risk factors for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome.[138] This page explores the various benefits of nuts for people with type 2 diabetes. Do different nuts have different health benefits for people with diabetes? Yes. Some nuts have benefits that others don't. Almonds contain a lot of nutrients, particularly vitamin E Walnuts contain healthy omega-3 fatty acids Cashews offers lots of magnesium Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce 'bad' cholesterol Almost all nuts offer something good for people with diabetes. Salted nuts, however, should be avoided. Excessive salt consumption is consistently linked to an increased risk of heart disease. Nuts and cholesterol One of the most prominent characteristics of nuts for people with diabetes is their effect on cholesterol levels. Avoiding high cholesterol levels is essential for people with diabetes, because exposure to high blood glucose levels increases the risk of the arteries narrowing. Almonds, peanuts, and pistachios all reduce "bad" cholesterol very effectively. "Bad" cholesterol refers to small, dense particles of low-density lipoprotein (LDL), too much of which can clog the arteries. Almonds, walnuts, pistachios, pecans, and hazelnuts reduce "bad" cholesterol by increasing levels of high-density-lipoprotein (HDL), or 'good' cholesterol. HDL clears out 'bad' cholesterol, thus reducing the risk of heart disease. Nuts and the glycemic index (GI) The glycemic index measures the speed at which your body Continue reading >>

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Author Sidebar: I didn't really care that much for nuts (or seeds) as a snack. I preferred potato chips or pretzels; or, a piece of fruit such as an apple or some grapes. But, after I recovered from my coma and returned to work, I realized that I needed something healthier than potato chips for a snack. :-) I started with salted, roasted peanuts; but, after doing some research, I discovered that roasted nuts tended not to be healthy because the heat caused damaged to the healthy fats within the nuts. In addition, I discovered that peanuts were one of the least healthy nuts. So, I gradually transitioned to raw nuts (no salt, not roasted), mainly almonds, pecans and walnuts; and, sometimes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Beyond helping with blood pressure, cholesterol, weight gain, and other health issues, there are 4 major problems that nuts and seeds help address to have them quality as super fats that help reverse your diabetes. 1. Healthy Snacks: is key to help diabetics maintain proper glucose control, especially between major meals. Eating nuts and seeds make it a lot easier to prepare quick and healthy snacks. 2. Healthy Fats: is one of the areas where many diabetics are lacking from a nutrient content perspective. Nuts and seeds provide monounsaturated fats, oleic acid and Omega-3 fats to help address inflammation, oxidation, weight gain, blood glucose levels and insulin levels. 3. Cravings: is a problem area that nuts and seeds can help with because of their macronutrient and micronutrient content, especially the fat, protein and minerals. 4. Eating Fruits: can be better tolerated when eaten with a handful of nuts and seeds. Why? Because the protein and fat in the nuts and seeds offset the carbs in the fruit. Nuts and Seed | Reverse Diabetes| Othe Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide (1). Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions (2). Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of thesen three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn't digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn't raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or "net" carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body's nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it's important to avoid the foods listed below. Sugary beverages are the worst drink choice for someone with diabetes. To begin with, they are very high in carbs, with a 12-ounce (354-ml) can of soda prov Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

The Trouble With Peanuts In Managing Diabetes

If you have diabetes, beware of peanuts, peanut butter, and peanut oil. Some people think that because most tree nuts, like almonds, are so healthy, that peanuts should also be good for us. But peanuts aren’t nuts at all. They are a legume, and unlike most nuts we can’t eat them raw because they are sometimes covered with a dangerous fungus. Actually, we can’t eat them at all if we want to avoid some of the side effects that we can get from them. Some of these side effects can be quite serious. I can think of only nine reasons why we have to avoid peanuts or anything made from them. Maybe you can think of more, but these eight might be enough to give anyone pause: 1. Peanuts have a lot of carbohydrates, which raise our blood sugar level. Take a look at the US Department of Agriculture’s [National Nutrient Database](which is the gold standard of nutrient facts. "One tablespoon of natural, unsweetened peanut butter contains 3 grams of carbohydrate and will raise my blood sugar 15 mg/dl," writes Dr. Richard K. Bernstein in the 2011 edition of his book Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution. "Imagine the effect on blood sugar of downing 10 tablespoons!" 2. Peanuts are the source of one of the most common food allergies. "They have the potential to provoke acute allergic reactions (e.g., hives or anaphylaxis) that can be dangerous in the susceptible, even fatal in rare instances," writes Dr. William Davis in his 2011 book, Wheat Belly. Many schools will no longer let children bring peanut butter products to school. 3. Peanuts "contain lectins and other anti-nutrients that can adversely affect your health, particularly if you are suffering from an autoimmune disorder," writes Loren Cordain in his 2002 book, The Paleo Diet. These lectins "are known to increase intestinal Continue reading >>

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

Nuts Good For Some With Diabetes

July 8, 2011 -- Eating about 2 ounces of nuts daily in place of carbohydrates may be beneficial to people with type 2 diabetes by lowering bad cholesterol levels and improving blood sugar control, a new study shows. “There are two important factors in caring for diabetes: blood sugar control and heart health,” study researcher Cyril W.C. Kendall, PhD, of the University of Toronto, says in a news release. The study involved 117 people with type 2 diabetes who were randomly assigned to one of three groups. One group’s members ate about 2 ounces of mixed nuts daily, another a healthy muffin, and the third half nuts and half muffin. Researchers say those whose diet included 2 ounces of nuts showed better results after three months in both blood sugar and LDL "bad" cholesterol levels than participants in the other two groups. The nuts consisted of a mixture of unsalted and mostly raw almonds, pistachios, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, peanuts, cashews, and macadamias. The muffin was concocted to be a healthy whole wheat product, sweetened with apple concentrate but with no sugar added. The muffins had similar protein content to the nuts from the addition of egg white and skim milk powder. Calories from monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFAs) in the nuts were the same as the carbohydrate calories in the muffin, the researchers write. During the three-month study, participants were asked to maintain their oral diabetes medications. The main outcome researchers looked for was change in a marker of blood sugar control called HbA1c. Kendall described the results of the study as “a very exciting and promising finding about the treatment” of type 2 diabetes. The researchers write that the reduction in the HbA1c level was significantly more in those in the nuts-only group than pa Continue reading >>

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