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Can You Eat Lentils If You Have Diabetes?

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

Can Chickpeas And Lentils Help Control Diabetes?

They’re a common part of traditional diets in India and Latin America, but in western repasts, legumes or pulses — that’s lentils, dried beans, and chick peas — have generally been a culinary afterthought. That may soon change, however, thanks to new research suggesting legumes alone can improve the health of diabetics. The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicines, was funded in part by an association of legume farmers and confirms that simply changing what they eat can help diabetics reduce some of their symptoms, as well as lower their risk of heart disease — in as little as a few months. MORE: Guide: The 31 Healthiest Foods of All Time (With Recipes) Starting in 2010, researchers in Toronto, Canada, enrolled 121 patients with Type II diabetes and tested their blood sugar, blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and more. Roughly half of the study participants were randomly selected to add a cup of legumes per day to their diet. The other half were told to try to eat more whole-wheat products. After three months, the patients were tested again on the same measures. Both the legume-eaters and the whole-wheat-eaters saw a reduction in their hemoglobin A1c values — a marker of average blood sugar, for a period of several weeks. But that reduction was slightly larger among the legume group than among the whole-what group: 0.5% compared to 0.3%. And while those changes may seem small, the study authors say that drops of this magnitude are “therapeutically meaningful,” and can lead to fewer diabetic symptoms as well as lower doses of medication to control blood sugar levels. The legume-eaters also achieved modest reductions in body weight relative to the wheat group, losing an average of 5.9 lbs compared to 4.4 lbs, as well as drops in total choles Continue reading >>

5 Reasons Why You Should Eat Lentils!

5 Reasons Why You Should Eat Lentils!

Categories: Lentils are a “super food” that Project Open Hand includes in nutritious meals, which help our clients fight illness and cope with the challenges of aging. Here are 5 reasons you should eat more lentils: PROTECT YOUR DIGESTIVE SYSTEM – high in fiber Lentils are rich in dietary fiber, both the soluble and the insoluble type. They are undigested, which means they will pass out of our bodies. Insoluble fiber encourages regular bowel movement and prevents constipation and helps prevent colon cancer. While soluble fiber reduces the risk of heart disease and regulates blood sugar for people with diabetes. Men need at least 30 to 38g of fiber each day. Women need at least 20 to 25g of fiber each day. And one cup of cooked lentils provides more than 15 grams of dietary fiber. PROTECT YOUR HEART – significant amount of folate and magnesium Lentils contribute to heart health in their soluble fiber and in the significant amount of folate and magnesium. One cup of cooked lentils provides 90% of the recommended daily allowance for folic acid, which protects the artery walls and prevents heart disease. Magnesium lowers resistance and improves the flow of blood, oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. And studies show that a deficiency of magnesium is associated with heart attack. STABILIZE YOUR BLOOD SUGAR – full of complex carbohydrates The soluble fiber in lentils helps stabilize blood sugar levels. If you have insulin resistance, hypoglycemia or diabetes, lentils are full of complex carbohydrates that can help you… Control your blood glucose levels Control your cholesterol levels Control your appetite Lower your risk of getting type 2 diabetes HIGH IN PROTEIN With 25% protein, Lentil is the vegetable with the highest level of protein other than soybeans. Continue reading >>

Why Eating More Of This High-fiber Food May Lower Your Diabetes Risk

Why Eating More Of This High-fiber Food May Lower Your Diabetes Risk

Researchers have identified yet another way pulses can boost your health. Here's how to add more lentils, beans, and chickpeas to your diet. Pulses are trending big time. That includes all types of beans, lentils, peas, and chickpeas. New products—from lentil chips to roasted chickpeas—are appearing on grocery story shelves, and desserts made with pulse flours and pureed pulses are all over Pinterest (black bean brownies, anyone?). There's a lot to love about pulses: They're gluten-free and eco-friendly, and loaded with nutrients and antioxidants. And now, there's another reason to add more pulses to your diet: Recent research suggests they might help you stave off type 2 diabetes. A new study published in the journal Clinical Nutrition tracked more than 3,300 adults who were at high risk of heart disease for four years. Researchers found that compared to those with a low intake of pulses (12.73 grams/day, or about 1.5 servings/week), those with a higher consumption (28.75 grams/day, equivalent to 3.35 servings/week) had a 35% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The study also showed that participants who substituted half a serving of pulses a day for a similar serving of eggs, bread, rice, or baked potato had a lower incidence of diabetes. The health protection that pulses offer may be related to several factors. In addition to being rich in B vitamins and minerals (including calcium, potassium and magnesium), pulses have a unique macronutrient makeup: The protein, fiber, and carbohydrates that pulses pack help to slow digestion. This extends the feeling of fullness, delays hunger, and results in a low glycemic response—meaning pulses help your body regulate blood glucose and insulin levels. Full disclosure: I’m obsessed with pulses. A few years ago I wro Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

7 Diabetes Superfoods You Should Try

1 / 8 Embrace Superfood Diversity You probably know that salmon is a good choice if you have diabetes because it’s rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which may improve your body’s ability to respond to insulin. Broccoli is another good choice because it’s high in fiber and may help to reverse the heart damage diabetes can cause. But salmon and broccoli aren’t the only superfoods for a healthy diabetes diet. "Eating a variety of different types of nutrient-dense foods creates the healthiest diet since there is no one food that provides all of the essential nutrients our body needs for optimum health," says Lynn Grieger, RDN, CDE, a health, food, and fitness coach in Arizona and dietitian with the Mayo Clinic Diet online program. Liven up your meal plan and enhance your health by adding these seven good-for-diabetes foods to your shopping list. Continue reading >>

Pulses And Diabetes

Pulses And Diabetes

As a nation, we buy 1.5 million tins of baked beans every week from a well-known food manufacturer and there can’t be many of us who’ve never known the simple pleasure of eating beans on toast! Beans are a type of pulse, a term which also includes lentils and peas. A pulse is an edible seed that grows in a pod. The bean that’s used in baked beans is usually the haricot bean. Pulses have many health benefits and it’s so easy to get more of them in your meals – and they’re cheap, too. What pulses are available? In addition to the humble baked bean, there are many other beans, lentils and peas out there. If you take a quick look in your local supermarket or type in ‘pulses’ when you do your online shop, you will see there are many different types available: aduki beans black-eyed beans black turtle beans borlotti beans broad beans butter beans cannellini bean chickpeas flageolet beans garden peas kidney beans lentils – green, red split, puy pinto beans Seven reasons to eat more pulses 1. They have a low glycaemic index (GI) Even though pulses contain carbohydrates, they don’t give sharp rises to blood glucose levels compared to other carbohydrate-containing foods. The make-up of the carbohydrates in pulses, the fibre content and the fact that they are high in protein slows down the breakdown of the carbohydrates into glucose in the blood. Therefore, people with diabetes often find it doesn’t cause big spikes in their glucose levels, especially if the portions are not too big. For this reason, many people with diabetes who carb count are often advised not to count the carbohydrate in pulses, unless eaten in bigger quantities or they are part of a carbohydrate-containing pre-packed food which makes it difficult to isolate the carb from pulses. It is imp Continue reading >>

Are Lentils Good For Diabetics?

Are Lentils Good For Diabetics?

Can Diabetics Eat Lentils? Lentils are a kind of legume widely used in different parts of the world. They are low in fat, rich in protein, and a huge source of fiber, which can short down the risk of heart disease . According to MayoClinic, lentils are also the rich source of iron, potassium, folate, and phosphorous. They make a convenient, affordable, and healthy alternative to chicken, fish and other animal protein sources. Lentils are also enriched with phytochemicals, which are also a kind of legume like other pulses, so they can help control the risk of cancer. But it is also found to help control diabetes as it is low on Glycemic index. Lentils are very rich in protein . According to the Standard Reference reports by the US Department of Agriculture National Nutrient Database, 1 cup of cooked lentils has up to 17g of protein. Well, lentils are not the complete protein as they dont have all the nine vital amino acids. They still lack the amino acids like cysteine and methionine. Sprouted lentils have propr amount of all the nine amino acids. You can get all the amino acids that are vital by pairing cooked ones with a grain like rice. A diabetic needs 15g of carbohydrate every day. In many meal plans for diabetics, up to three services of carbohydrate is required for each meal. A 1-cup cooked lentils serving add up to 39.9gm of carbohydrates to your diet. But 15.6g comes from fiber. So, diabetics can reduce half of the fiber off the carbohydrate value if a food has up to 5g of carbohydrate. It results in up to 32.1g of carbohydrates, which is around 2 servings of carbohydrate. Must Read: Olive Oil & Diabetes: Is Olive Oil Good for Diabetics? According to a study published in 2008 in ARYA Atherosclerosis , people have reduced their increasing cholesterol and blood s Continue reading >>

Beans Will Rock Your World

Beans Will Rock Your World

I’ve started eating a lot more beans. Why? They are healthy and cheap. They make me feel good, and it turns out they taste great if you prepare them right. Research shows that beans are even better if you have diabetes. A woman in my neighborhood got me started. We were talking about diabetes, and she said she had been diagnosed with Type 2 five years ago. But she now eats beans with every meal, and all her numbers are back to normal, including her glucose tolerance test. I figured I should look into it. Of course the first place to look is always Diabetes Self-Management‘s Amy Campbell. Here’s what she wrote in 2007: “Beans are a rich source of protein. One cup of beans contains about 16 grams of protein, the same as 2 ounces of meat or chicken. People who are vegetarians typically use beans and bean products as their main source of protein. Beans contain no cholesterol…and only about 1 gram of fat (non of it saturated, either).” That’s just the start. Amy says beans “also contains about 15 grams of [mostly-soluble] fiber…which can help lower cholesterol levels and lower the risk of heart disease…Beans are also a great source of iron, calcium, potassium, and magnesium, as well as vitamin A and folate.” That column was from five years ago. Since then, others have been shouting the praises of beans even more loudly. According to Jim Healthy, editor of the Web site My Healing Kitchen, “Beans are best for diabetes,” because “they are loaded with all-important fiber, which slows the breakdown of carbohydrates into sugars in your bloodstream, assists your body’s insulin response to glucose, and helps you burn fat faster.” They will limit the spikes in glucose levels after meals. (See last week’s blog entry “Stop Spiking Those Sugars!”) H Continue reading >>

Using Lentils To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Using Lentils To Help Manage Type 2 Diabetes

November is Diabetes Month in Canada, and November 14 is World Diabetes Day. That means it’s a great time to talk about how a diet rich in legumes – including lentils – can help regulate blood sugar and improve glycemic control, both important factors in managing type 2 diabetes. It’s been known for some time that both high-fibre foods and legumes are important components of a diabetes diet because of their low glycemic index (GI) – a measurement of a food’s impact on blood sugar. Most diabetics have probably already been told to eat more whole grains and legumes. But until recently, there was little hard evidence of the actual impact of these dietary changes on the long-term management of diabetes. University of Toronto researchers decided to find out exactly how much high-fibre and high-legume diets could benefit those with type 2 diabetes. They divided a group of 121 type 2 diabetes patients and had half of them add a cup of legumes to their diet each day, while the other half consumed whole-wheat foods. Researchers measured the impact on blood sugar and blood pressure. Their results, published online in October by the scientific journal Archives of Internal Medicine, showed that HbA1c (hemoglobin A1c), a measure of blood sugar, was reduced for both groups, with the high-legume group seeing a larger drop. The high-legume group also saw a much larger drop in blood pressure than the high-fibre group, indicating that a high-legume diet may also help type 2 diabetes patients ward off heart disease. The great news here is that it’s incredibly easy to incorporate more legumes into your diet. Lentils are much easier to prepare than beans because they require no pre-soaking, and they work well in many different kinds of dishes. 7 Easy Ways to Add Lentils to You Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Consider this your diabetes diet cheat sheet! Consider this your diabetes diet cheat sheet! Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesnt mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eatyou may just not know what they are yet. But thats okay, because were here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once youve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, its important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products cant claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect, explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook. , adding,* I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal. For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly . Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins werent the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didnt realize just how awful certain pastries can be. Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entir Continue reading >>

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

14 Fantastically Healthy Foods For Diabetics

When you think of managing blood sugar, odds are you obsess over everything you can't have. While it's certainly important to limit no-no ingredients (like white, refined breads and pastas and fried, fatty, processed foods), it's just as crucial to pay attention to what you should eat. We suggest you start here. Numerous nutrition and diabetes experts singled out these power foods because 1) they're packed with the four healthy nutrients (fiber, omega-3s, calcium, and vitamin D) that make up our Diabetes DTOUR Diet, and 2) they're exceptionally versatile, so you can use them in recipes, as add-ons to meals, or stand-alone snacks. 1. Beans Beans have more to boast about than being high in fiber (plant compounds that help you feel full, steady blood sugar, and even lower cholesterol; a half cup of black beans delivers more than 7 grams). They're a not-too-shabby source of calcium, a mineral that research shows can help burn body fat. In ½ cup of white beans, you'll get almost 100 mg of calcium—about 10% of your daily intake. Beans also make an excellent protein source; unlike other proteins Americans commonly eat (such as red meat), beans are low in saturated fat—the kind that gunks up arteries and can lead to heart disease. How to eat them: Add them to salads, soups, chili, and more. There are so many different kinds of beans, you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice. 2. Dairy You're not going to find a better source of calcium and vitamin D—a potent diabetes-quelling combination—than in dairy foods like milk, cottage cheese, and yogurt. One study found that women who consumed more than 1,200 mg of calcium and more than 800 IU of vitamin D a day were 33% less likely to develop diabetes than those taking in less of both Continue reading >>

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

No Starches, No Sugars — Then What?

People around the world are eating low-carbohydrate diets to treat their diabetes. But all plant foods, other than seeds, are carbs. So what can you eat? Is it all animal products, or are there other options? We know the arguments against eating carbs. Other than fiber, carbs are either sugars or starches that break down into sugars. Since people with diabetes have little to no effective insulin, which is necessary for handling sugars (glucose), they probably shouldn’t eat them. But is this argument totally true? Perhaps not. Vegans and vegetarians tend to eat a lot of carbs, and many of them seem to do quite well with diabetes. Many people in poor countries who cannot afford meat also have relatively low rates of diabetes. So what’s their secret? What are they eating? It seems clear that the successful ones eat very low amounts of refined sugars and simple starches. They may have small amounts of truly whole grains (not stuff that is marketed as “whole grain” but is actually highly processed). They eat small amounts of fruits and starchy vegetables. (Diabetic low-carb guru Dr. Richard Bernstein says he hasn’t eaten a piece of fruit in decades.) What’s left? Well, from a carb standpoint, you can eat as much animal food, like meat and eggs, as you want. They don’t have any carbs (although dairy products do). You can vary that with sea animals — they don’t contain carbs either. There are probably a few health risks from eating so much meat. Your toxic load will be higher, unless you consistently eat organic free-range meat and wild-caught, small fish. You might get too much fat if you overdo it, but advocates like Bernstein have found no problems for themselves or their patients. However, from the standpoint of your wallet, the animals, and the planet, e Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Beans If you’re looking for foods that raise blood-sugar levels slowly and gently like rolling waves, choose high-quality carbohydrates instead of low-quality carbs like refined grains and sugary foods. Whenever possible, you’ll want to couple these carbs with protein and/or healthy fat. Beans (including black, white, navy, lima, pinto, garbanzo, soy, and kidney) are a winning combination of high-quality carbohydrates, lean protein, and soluble fiber that helps stabilize your body’s blood-sugar levels and keeps hunger in check. Beans are also inexpensive, versatile, and virtually fat-free. Continue reading >>

Add Lentils And Beans Into Your Diet. Here's Why.

Add Lentils And Beans Into Your Diet. Here's Why.

You might have heard that lentils and beans are considered a diabetic superfood, but what makes these legumes so promising? Here’s a breakdown of why you should be eating more beans and lentils and some simple ways to incorporate them into your daily diet. Beans Dried beans offer high-quality carbohydrates, lean protein, and soluble fiber. They help stabilize blood sugar levels while keeping your hunger in check. Because they are inexpensive, versatile, and have a long shelf life, beans are a great addition to any meal. They are considered a low glycemic index food, meaning they are digested slowly and raise blood sugar slowly. Research has shown that eating beans several times a week may also lower blood pressure along with blood sugar levels. Dried beans make a perfect kitchen staple, but they need to be soaked before cooking. Many varieties of canned beans are packed in salt and water. It’s important to rinse and drain them before using. If possible, look for the low- or reduced-sodium options. Two great recipes that include beans Beans and chocolate may sound odd to most, but these Black Bean Brownies have less than six carbs per serving and make for a healthier dessert option. You can't eat beans without thinking about chili. This Kickin’ Hot Chili is spicy and full of red kidney beans and ground beef. Lentils Lentils have slightly higher protein numbers and typically have slightly fewer carbohydrates than beans. They are rich in fiber and contain a significant amount of magnesium. Magnesium is known to improve blood and oxygen flow, leading to a lower risk of heart problems. Because they are a complex carbohydrate, they help stabilize blood sugar levels. With more than 50 grams of protein in one cup, lentils have a higher level of protein than soybeans. Like Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat If I Have Diabetes?

What Should I Eat If I Have Diabetes?

I am type 2 diabetic trying to create a daily diet, and snacks, food program that I can use to prevent getting the terrible sick feeling that comes when my sugar goes too low. I would like to store these foods and snacks in my home so that I can reach them when necessary. Please name the foods, and snacks, as well as the proper times to consume them. Also when is the time to take Metformin even if your readings are regular and you feel OK? Thank you for your answer to these questions. Hi, Barbara. To prevent hypoglycemia and to minimize the complications associated with diabetes including heart disease, kidney disease, eye problems and infection, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as steady as possible throughout the day. To accomplish this, I recommend trying to combine some type of lean protein (skinless chicken, fish, turkey, lean ground beef, beans, egg whites, low-fat cottage cheese or yogurt) or healthy fat (olive oil, canola oil, nuts, seeds, avocado) with a healthy carbohydrate with each meal or snack. Make sure to choose healthy, low-sugar, antioxidant-rich carbohydrates like whole grains (brown rice, whole-wheat pasta, whole-grain bread, cereal, crackers, quinoa, barley), whole fruit (not juice or dried fruit) and vegetables. These types of carbohydrates are generally low-glycemic, which means they increase blood sugar less rapidly than highly processed, refined, sugar-filled carbohydrates. Naturally high-fiber foods are always a good choice as they slow the emptying of food from your stomach, which helps improve blood sugar control. By preventing spikes in blood sugar, you can also prevent the crashes that follow. It is also important to try to eat regularly throughout the day. Try not to let more than four hours go by without having either a meal or Continue reading >>

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