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Can You Eat Greek Yogurt If You Have Diabetes?

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

What's The Best Yogurt For People With Diabetes?

Yogurt, typically made from cow's milk (however, nowadays there are many alternatives), is a source of carbohydrate which is also full of good bacteria, calcium, and protein. If you have diabetes, yogurt can be a smart food choice; however, the trick is to know which kind of yogurt to choose and which to skip out on. What to Look for in a Yogurt In the best kinds of yogurt, you get a good balance of protein and carbohydrate, along with calcium and healthy probiotics. You also don't get a lot of added sugar, additives, food coloring, or saturated fat. Choosing a low-fat or non-fat yogurt version can help you to reduce your total calorie intake as well as keep your saturated fat (the type of fat that increase bad LDL cholesterol) low. In addition, since yogurt is a source of carbohydrate, you'll want to choose a yogurt that is low in added sugars such as fruited yogurts or those yogurts with added granola, or other toppings that are rich in sugar. Therefore, it's best to choose plain, low-fat yogurt. If you need to add sweetness, top your yogurt with some berries or peaches. Frozen varieties can make your yogurt seem "syrup-y", too, for more fiber and less added sugar. Greek Yogurt vs. Regular Yogurt Greek yogurt is regular yogurt that's been strained, removing some of the whey and leaving behind a thicker, more protein-rich yogurt. Greek yogurt is readily available in regular grocery stores; find it in the refrigerated dairy section. Regular yogurt provides 5 grams of protein per 6-ounce serving, while Greek yogurt provides up to 20 grams, depending on the brand. Because it has more protein, Greek yogurt has about 1/3 the carbohydrate of regular yogurt. And, because lactose is a source of carbohydrate in dairy products, this means that many people find Greek yogurt easie Continue reading >>

Choosing The Best Yogurt For You

Choosing The Best Yogurt For You

Have you taken a good hard look at the dairy case lately? If it’s a lot bigger than you remember, it’s likely because yogurt has commandeered much of the space. With so many flavors and varieties to choose from, it can be tricky to figure out what to buy. What is yogurt? Yogurt is probably one of the oldest foods around. The word yogurt is Turkish in origin, and it’s thought that it dates back to the Neolithic people of Central Asia around 6000 B.C. Yogurt was actually “discovered” accidentally: herdsman would carry milk in animal stomachs. The enzymes from the stomachs curdled the milk, turning it into what we know today as yogurt. Turkish immigrants brought yogurt to North American in the 1700s but it really caught on in the 1940s when the son of the Danone company founder started a small yogurt factory in the Bronx. We now know this company now as Dannon. Why eat yogurt? Yogurt has a lot going for it. It’s rich in a number of nutrients, including: • Calcium • Protein • Potassium • Magnesium • Vitamin D • Vitamin B-12 • Vitamin B-2 Protein and magnesium are two key nutrients for diabetes management. Protein provides a feeling of fullness and can even out blood sugar levels. Magnesium helps improve insulin sensitivity, which can also help improve blood sugar levels. Along with the above nutrients, yogurt contains probiotics, also known as “good” bacteria. While more research is needed, evidence points to these friendly bacteria as helping to boost the immune system, improving digestion, preventing urinary tract infections, and easing certain skin conditions, such as eczema. Yogurt’s darker side Sugar: While yogurt seems to be bursting with nutrition, some types of yogurt contain ingredients that aren’t so healthful. Many yogurts on the Continue reading >>

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Why Greek Yogurt Should Be Part Of Your Type 2 Diabetes Diet

Smooth, creamy, thick — Greek yogurt is one of the hottest foods around, and its popularity shows no signs of abating. With a pudding-like texture and a slightly tart flavor, Greek yogurt also has more protein and fewer carbs and fewer sugars than traditional yogurt. This means that Greek yogurt can be even better for people with type 2 diabetes, says Tami Ross, RD, CDE, a diabetes educator in Lexington, Kentucky. "My patients love the consistency of it," Ross explains. "Even the patients who are not big on yogurt or milk products overwhelmingly seem to like Greek yogurt." Greek yogurt's thick consistency comes from straining it to remove liquid whey. This process increases the amount of protein per serving and removes some of the carbohydrates, which people with diabetes must watch carefully. "For folks with diabetes, the lower carbs are a plus," Ross notes. "You can work in the yogurt for a snack without having to account for so many carbohydrates." The increased protein can also help you feel that you've had a more substantial snack, so you'll feel more satisfied and won't be hungry for something else quite so quickly. "In terms of promoting satiety and helping people feel full, it's great," Ross says. And starting your day with Greek yogurt may even help you manage your blood sugar throughout the day. Eating low-GI foods for breakfast helps prevent blood-sugar spikes later on, one recent study found. How to Find the Right Greek Yogurt Of course, not all Greek yogurts are created equal. With many brands and flavors on the market, it's important to read nutrition labels carefully to find one that will work with a diabetes-friendly diet. Carbohydrate content is the most important item to look for on the nutrition label of Greek yogurt, since it accounts for the sugar Continue reading >>

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

Yogurt Every Day May Help Keep Diabetes Away

HealthDay Reporter TUESDAY, Nov. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Eating a serving a day of yogurt may lower your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, new research suggests. "The data we have gathered show that yogurt consumption can have significant benefit in reducing the risk of diabetes," said senior study author Dr. Frank Hu, a professor of nutrition and epidemiology at Harvard School of Public Health, in Boston. "It's not a huge effect, about an 18 percent reduction [in risk]." "Yogurt is not magic for curing or preventing diabetes," Hu said. "That's the bottom line and the message we want to convey to our consumers, that we have to pay attention to our diet pattern. There is no replacement for an overall healthy diet and maintaining [a healthy] body weight." The study is published online Nov. 24 in the journal BMC Medicine. It was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not produce enough insulin or the body's cells develop a resistance to insulin, and blood sugar levels then get too high. For the study, Hu and his team pooled the result of three large studies that tracked the medical histories and lifestyle habits of health professionals: the Health Professionals' Follow-up Study of more than 51,000 male health professionals; the Nurses' Health Study, which included more than 121,000 women nurses; and the Nurses' Health Study II, which followed nearly 117,000 women nurses. During the study follow-up, there were about 15,000 cases of type 2 diabetes. When they looked at total dairy intake, they saw no effect on the risk of diabetes. However, when they zeroed in on yogurt, they found one serving a day was linked with about a 17 percent reduced risk. The researchers next pooled their result with other published studies that lo Continue reading >>

Eating Yogurt May Cut Diabetes Risk, New Research Shows

Eating Yogurt May Cut Diabetes Risk, New Research Shows

Worried about the risk of developing diabetes? You might want to eat more yogurt. That's the takeaway from new research out of the University of Cambridge, which found that a significantly lower percentage of study subjects who ate yogurt at least four times a week developed diabetes than those who did not. Using data from a long-term study of the diets and health of 30,000 people in Norfolk, England, the researchers compared the diets of 753 participants who developed Type 2 diabetes over an 11-year period with 3,500 randomly selected people from the same population who remained healthy. The study, which was published yesterday in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, analyzed study participants' consumption of all dairy products as well as specific foods. Like all such studies, the research documents only an association and does not prove cause and effect, cautioned lead researcher Dr. Nita Forouhi, an epidemiology group leader at the Medical Research Council at the University of Cambridge. Nevertheless, yogurt contains calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and fatty acids, all of which have known health benefits, according to Forouhi. The fermentation process that turns milk into yogurt also produces probiotic bacteria and "specific types of vitamin K," that are known to be beneficial. While Forouhi and her team stopped short of identifying a mechanism for the protective effects of yogurt, it's likely that probiotic bacteria play a key role. Recent research has pointed towards the role of gut bacteria in mediating inflammation and thus increasing or decreasing the risk of numerous diseases including colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease and Crohn's disease, as well as diabetes. In the last few years, studies have also su Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

Can Diabetics Eat Bananas?

When a person has diabetes, they need to carefully consider the contents of each meal. This can be especially true for carbohydrate-containing food, which not only includes desserts and other sweet treats, but bread, pasta, and fresh fruits. One fruit that traditionally has been on the "avoid" list for those with diabetes is bananas. However, for the most part, bananas eaten in moderation can be safely enjoyed when a person has diabetes. Bananas grow on banana plants that can have anywhere from 50 to 150 bananas in each bunch of fruit. The individual bananas are sold in varying sizes, from small to extra-large, the size-grading being determined by their length. Nutritional breakdown Overall, bananas are low in saturated fat, sodium, and cholesterol. They also have a good mix of nutrients, including vitamin B6, potassium, and manganese. However, some doctors and dietitians may give bananas greater nutritional scrutiny when considering them for people with diabetes, because bananas are high in sugar relative to their calories. One medium banana has an estimated glycemic load of 11, according to Harvard Health Publishing on glycemic loads. Glycemic load is a measure of a food's impact on blood sugar. A glycemic load of fewer than 10 is considered low, while one above 20 is high. Can you eat bananas if you have diabetes? Examples of lower-sugar fruit options include apples, grapes, and pears. Fruits with higher sugar levels include papayas and pineapples. However, those with diabetes do not have to eliminate bananas from their diet, or any other fruit for that matter. Their other nutritional values in terms of vitamins and minerals can make them a healthy option for those with diabetes when consumed in moderation. The American Diabetes Association recommend incorporating fr Continue reading >>

What's In Your Pot?

What's In Your Pot?

According to consumer research, the UK population spends a staggering 1.7 billion a year on yogurt and fromage frais. With an ever-increasing range of yogurt varieties on offer, it can be difficult to work out why one variety may be more or less healthy than another. Here at Enjoy Food, we thought it was about time we took a closer look at this popular product and find out what exactly is in those pots… The good news Yogurt provides many health benefits. Made with milk, it contains protein and calcium needed for healthy bones and teeth. Some yogurts also have added vitamin D, which helps our body to absorb calcium. It’s also good to know that low-fat yogurts have just as much calcium as the full-fat versions. Some research even suggests that eating yogurt can help you to feel fuller, which may make it easier to manage your weight. As well as a useful portable snack, or instant pudding when you fancy a sweet fix, plain, natural, or greek yogurt can be used as a topping on fruit and desserts instead of cream, in smoothies, or in cooking. Spotlight on sugar As with most manufactured food products, you need to take a step back from the marketing hype and take a closer look at the food label, to check whether that innocent looking pot is as healthy as it seems. Many yogurts, particularly the ones aimed at children, are crammed full of the ‘free sugars’ we all need to cut back on. Looking at the label, the carbohydrate ‘of which sugars’ provides useful information. An amount in grams (g) will be given. Spotting 'free sugars' This figure includes sugars which come naturally from the milk used to make the yogurt, known as ‘lactose’, as well as any sugar added to the yogurt, ie ‘free sugars’, and sugar that comes naturally from any fruit or fruit puree that h Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Yogurt can be a great nutrient-dense breakfast option or an easy snack. It is low in carbohydrates, meaning it won’t cause blood sugar spikes in people with diabetes. There may even be additional benefits for people with diabetes. What Research Shows Fermented foods, such as yogurt, contain good bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics have been shown to improve gut health. Research on gut health is ongoing, but gut bacteria and overall health could play a factor in a number of health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. What Do I Need to Know About Probiotics? Recent research shows that yogurt consumption might be associated with lower levels of glucose and insulin resistance, and lower systolic blood pressure. Another study found a potential link between regular yogurt consumption and a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. These studies are encouraging, but more research is needed to determine what link, if any, exists between yogurt and type 2 diabetes. What Makes Yogurt Great Most dairy products are low on the glycemic index. This makes them ideal for people with diabetes. To get the most out of your yogurt, check the labels before you purchase. If you want the gut benefits from the probiotics, choose a yogurt that contains live and active cultures. Also pay attention to the nutrition facts. Many yogurts have added sugars. Look for yogurts with high protein content and low carbohydrates, such as unflavored Greek yogurt. Sugar content among brands, and even among flavors within the same brand, can vary drastically, so check labels closely. Carbohydrates By Yogurt Type Yogurt Type (6 ounces) Carbohydrates Sugar plain Greek yogurt 6-8 grams 4-8 grams flavored Greek yogurt 16-22 grams 12-18 grams plain yogurt 11-15 grams 10-12 grams vanilla yogurt 22-33 grams 21-28 Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Prevent dangerous blood sugar spikes with the help of these foods. Yogurt Low-fat yogurt naturally contains both high-quality carbohydrates and protein, making it an excellent food for slowing or preventing an unhealthy rise in blood sugar. Studies also show that a diet high in calcium from yogurt and other calcium-rich foods is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes. Be sure to stick to low-fat or nonfat brands; fat-free Greek yogurt is my top pick because it has twice as much protein as regular nonfat yogurt. Previous Next More Photos Almonds Fish Continue reading >>

At The Grocery Store

At The Grocery Store

Greek yogurt has taken a huge chunk of the Québec yogurt market and now comes in a wide variety of brands and flavours. Creamy and high in protein Greek yogurt differs from "regular" yogurt by its creamy texture. The difference is due to the manufacturing process, which removes a portion of the liquid from the yogurt, leaving a solid, high-protein residue. For the same portion size, Greek yogurt has twice the protein of regular yogurt. This process also gives the yogurt a creamy taste even though it is made from skim milk. A premium price Because liquid is removed, the production of Greek yogurt requires three to four times the amount of milk as traditional yogurt, which justifies its higher price. High nutrient value The technique Greek-yogurt manufacturers use to remove water from the milk before producing the yogurt has an effect on its nutritional value. For example, the traditional drip technique results in the loss of some of the calcium and lactose contained in the milk, whereas a different technique preserves these two nutrients. The table below compares various plain Greek yogurt brands on the market. The table uses the "fat free" variety when available, or the lowest-fat version if a company does not produce a “fat free” product. Nutritional Value of Plain, Fat-free Greek Yogurt Compared to Regular Yogurt Per 175 g (175 ml or 3/4 cup) Protein (g) Carbohydrates (g) Calcium (% DV*) Vitamin D (% DV*) Plain, regular yogurt2 8 12 30% 0 to 35% Astro Original, plain, fat free 18 7 49% 0% President’s Choice 18 12 50% 0% Damafro1 14 6 40% 0% Iögo Greko1 (Ultima Foods) 17 7 45% 30% Liberty 20 6 15% 0% Oikos (Danone) 18 7 20% 0% Skotidakis 18 12 50% 0% * percentage Daily Value; that is, the percentage of the amount you need daily 1 fat-free not available: the ana Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Yogurt?

Can Diabetics Eat Yogurt?

Diabetes, a metabolic disorder that disrupts insulin production, affected 23.6 million Americans in 2007, according to the American Diabetes Association. Diabetes requires dietary adjustments to keep blood sugar levels within an acceptable range. High blood sugar levels can damage blood vessels, including those in the eyes and kidneys. Diabetics can eat any food, as long as they incorporate it into their daily carbohydrate allowance. Video of the Day Diabetic Food Plan Every diabetic should follow a food plan designed specifically for them. Overweight diabetics will follow a reduced-calorie eating plan which also limits daily carbohydrates. Diabetic diets generally restrict carbohydrate intake to a certain number of carbohydrates per meal or per day. Although complex carbohydrates such as whole grains add more nutritional value than simple sugars found in sweets, you can eat sweets in moderation, as long as your carbohydrate count remains within limits. People on a 1,600- to 2,000-per-day calorie level, for example, can eat eight starches per day, according to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders. The nutritional value of yogurt depends on the type you eat. Full-fat Fage plain Greek yogurt contains 20 grams of fat, 31 percent of your daily fat intake, and 16 g of saturated fat, 80 percent of your daily intake, while its 2 percent contains 4 g of fat, 3 g from saturated fats. Fage fat-free brand has no fat at all. Fage plain 2 percent yogurt has 8 g of carbohydrate compared to 19 g, all from sugar, for the strawberry flavor. Dannon’s Fruit on the Bottom strawberry contains even more sugar, 28 g. A serving also contains approximately 6 to 17 g of protein, depending on the type of yogurt and container size. Yogurt supplies an excellent so Continue reading >>

Testing Greek Yogurt And Exercise Today

Testing Greek Yogurt And Exercise Today

1:00 2 oz chicken breast, greek yogurt w/ cream 9 carbs 5:00 139 it should have gone down that much in 2 hours without any exercise. Guess--the Gazelle exercise didin't do any good Fact? greek yougurt and cream does not work well without other food. I usually eat it in along with protein and veggies. Future greek yogurt for 9 carbs may be on my "no" list If I was 2 I would be having a tantrum. But I am 72 so I guess I need to go for a 30 minute walk about now. Obviously swimming wont help with bg this high. If you're currently eating the yoghurt with protein and vegetables, have you considered replacing it with full fat sour cream? Also, as you people in the northern hemisphere are heading into winter, I can recommend trying sour cream in home made soup. I haven't eaten yoghurt since just after diagnosis because the carbs from the whole milk it's made from affected my BG too badly. I find testing food in the morning very inaccurate. Even if I don't eat any csrbs I will still spike over 140. So it is really hard to know if it was really the yogurt or not. I normally eat Greek yogurt most mornings with some PB in it to add some fat. I still spike but I need the calcium. 115 pounds, Breast Cancer dx'd 6/16, 6 months of chemo and 6 weeks of radiation 2000 metformin ER, 100 mg Januvia,Glimperide, Prolia, Gabapentin, Meloxicam, Probiotic with a Prebiotic, , Lisinopril, B-12, B-6, Tumeric, Magnesium, Calcium, Vit D, and Occuvite mostly vegan diet, low fat and around 125 carbs a day, walk 5-6 miles every other day and 1 hour of yoga and light weights. I find testing food in the morning very inaccurate. Even if I don't eat any csrbs I will still spike over 140. So it is really hard to know if it was really the yogurt or not. I normally eat Greek yogurt most mornings with some P Continue reading >>

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

26 Best And Worst Foods For Diabetics

Despite conventional wisdom, a diabetes diagnosis doesn’t mean you have to commit to a bland and boring diet. There are loads of delicious foods that are safe and healthy to eat—you may just not know what they are yet. But that’s okay, because we’re here to help! Read on to discover the best and worst drinks, grains, proteins, and produce picks for your diet, according to top nutritionists. Once you’ve read through the list and added some things to your shopping list, click over to these 15 Cooking and Eating Tips If You Have Diabetes to find out how to transform the Eat This picks into delicious, satisfying meals. According to the American Diabetes Association, it’s important to choose the most nutritious whole grains possible. Although grains help to maintain steady blood-sugar levels and provide heart-healthy fiber, white flour-based products can’t claim the same. Because the bran, germ, and endosperm have been compromised, these foods elevate blood-sugar levels and should only be consumed on occasion. “Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan, which seems to have an anti-diabetic effect,” explains Jackie Newgent, RDN, CDN, author of The All-Natural Diabetes Cookbook., adding,* “I advise people with diabetes to steer clear of added sugars by enjoying savory rather than sweet oatmeal.” For some tips on whipping up a delectable bowl of oats, dig into these 20 Savory Oatmeal Recipes for a Flat Belly. Though you likely assumed sugary donuts and muffins weren’t the best way to kick off your day, we bet you didn’t realize just how awful certain pastries can be. “Cinnamon rolls, for example, can contain more saturated fat and added sugars than people with diabetes should have in an entire day,” cautions Newgent. Yikes! Always turn down t Continue reading >>

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

Through twenty-five years of working with people with diabetes, when they come in for diabetes education, their first question is most often “What can I eat (or drink).” The next question is often, “What can’t I eat (or drink)? In this article, we will explore what foods are best to eat when you have just been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes, and Type 2 Diabetes, and what foods are best avoided. Quick Links (click to jump to specific section) There is no other guide available on the internet that will guide you through the best foods to choose, and the best foods to avoid. Take heed, as some foods in the American diet are detrimental. These are also the same foods that Americans are addicted to. On occasion, you will be able to eat from the foods to avoid list, such as on a holiday, or your birthday. It shouldn’t become a regular occurrence to eat foods that are best avoided if you have Pre-Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes. Also, eating healthier throughout your lifespan, can prevent Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes from ever surfacing at all. Starting to eat a healthy diet can help you to reverse your Pre-Diabetes, along with regular physical activity, and sometimes medication (most often Metformin). You can either get Type 2 Diabetes in good control, or you can reverse it to a Pre-Diabetes state in some cases, if you work on healthy lifestyle changes. Though it’s not always possible to reverse Type 2 Diabetes, it is certainly worth a shot. My new book to come out soon, entitled, “The Practical Guide for the Reversal of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes,” published by The Diabetes Council, will explore this topic in depth. Stay tuned! Eating appropriate foods Knowing which foods to eat, and which ones to avoid, can help you to manage your blood sugars, and avoid Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

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