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Can You Eat Chicken With Diabetes?

Eating Meat And Chicken Increases Your Risk Of Having Diabetes

Eating Meat And Chicken Increases Your Risk Of Having Diabetes

Juicy chicken wings, butter like soft mutton, unforgettable flavor and a blend of spices. Who wouldn't be tempted? A speech on how meat loads you with all the extra calories and is harmful for the heart and body, just never seemed to deviate us to our way to a barbecue restaurant. It seems unfair that most food items that we cherish so dearly are not really the best for our health. Take butter for instance, or even meat. The flavour of a steak done in butter or even a hot toast slathered with a generous spread of the fat makes it taste so good. But then again, health experts would always advise you against indulging in too much of it. While the debate seem to continue on whether saturated fats - such as butter - is good or bad for health, one thing is certain that too much of it can definitely lead to heart diseases, causing blockage of arteries. Butter is said to contain 51% of saturated fats. Portion control is the health mantra. You can savour different kinds of food provided you have them in little portions. The times we live in today, with chemicals, additives and what not in our food, it is imperative that we are mindful of what we are eating. (Health and Diet Tips for Women in Their 20s) Since butter is a fat source, too much of it is bound to cause various ailments. According to a study done by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the US, they found that people who consumed 12 grams per day of butter had a two-fold higher risk of developing diabetes. What Makes Butter Harmful? While the debate on saturated fats being good or bad for health continues, it is important to note that more than anything, what makes butter harmful is that it is a processed food product. Unlike the desi white butter which is made at home by churning malai or milk cream, the stor Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Chicken Breast Raising Blood Glucose??

Chicken Breast Raising Blood Glucose??

I look forward to contribe findings in reference to food and diabities as that should be the focus for all of us. My glucose was about 137 yesterday night 7pm when I decides to eat grilled chicken with no carb whats so ever..plain chicken with sauce that included 2 tomatos, garlic, red and green pepper, small amount of ginger, red onion, cup of cooking red wine, chives, and green onion. Then my glucose went to 290, then to 260...fluctuating in between 260 and 290.. I am serious. I had to take 5 tests to confirm and it was 260, 290, 259, etc I mean , does fat and protien turn to glucose??? I googled it and can not find any answer.. You could be sick, under stress or something else that is causing your bg to rise. And were your hands completly clean. With soap, water, towel try? [FONT=Century Gothic][SIZE=3][COLOR=Magenta]Kris[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT][FONT=Lucida Sans Unicode] I thought it was stress, but can stress add 130 points to glucose ?? ....you know, with forume like this we will nail diabities and find the cure, I truely beleive that. So you do not think chicken can raise it eh ?...this is weired I am doing this experiment again tomorrow... today i will settle with tuna salad..brocolli, lettus, tomatos, turkey (no carb), olive oil, apple cidar vinegar, red onion, garlic.. no bread...will see the reaction since tuna has protien Just to let you know, yes fat and protein can be turned to glucose, but typically not unless you have no glucose yourself so that's probably not the case. How about the sauce you made, did you eat a lot of it? While all of the ingredients have few carbs if you had a lot of sauce that could add a few carbs, but I'm just grasping at straws. Every now and then D throws us a curveball so don't be too worried about it unless it's a constant thing. Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Best And Worst Meals For Diabetes-savvy Dining

Balance Your Choices When you have type 2 diabetes, you need to eat a good mix of protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. So what's a well-balanced dinner? A power breakfast? The following meal examples can help you make better choices. Some people find it helps to count carbs. Keep in mind recommendations from your doctor or nutritionist, too. The Count: 2,060 calories, 276 g carbs No food is off-limits with diabetes, but this brunch will blow your carb and calorie budget in a hurry. Experts suggest that meals for people with diabetes should have 45-75 grams of carbohydrates, depending on individual goals. Your body weight, activity, and medications all matter. This meal packs enough carbs for four to five meals. The Count: 294 calories, 40 g carbs This quick meal delivers protein in a scrambled egg, and just 40 carbs, mostly from fiber-rich oatmeal and blueberries. Fiber slows digestion to help prevent blood sugar spikes. People with diabetes need to watch all types of carbs: cereal, bread, rice, pasta, starchy veggies, sweets, fruit, milk, and yogurt. Spread your total carbs across the day. The Count: 1,760 calories, 183 g carbs. Before one bite of burrito, you can get 98 grams of carbs and 810 calories in a basket of chips and salsa. If you're trying to slim down and eat less sodium, like many people with diabetes, the burrito adds 950 calories. You also get way more than a whole day's worth of sodium. The Count: 443 calories, 48 g carbs Lean beef and black beans make this Mexican dish a good option for a diabetic diet. The fiber in the beans can help lower blood cholesterol and control blood sugar. Go heavy on the veggies and light on cheese. Enjoy 10 small corn chips (1 ounce) with a little guacamole. The Count: 2,510 calories, 83 g carbs This classic Southern m Continue reading >>

7 Chicken Recipes For Diabetics

7 Chicken Recipes For Diabetics

Onions and leeks are from the same family, but they taste different. Leeks are sweeter and milder than onions. In this recipe, chicken is glazed in Dijon mustard and roasted with a fusion of leeks, onions, garlic, and shallots. According to a 2015 animal study , onions lower high blood sugar levels when given with the diabetes drug metformin. 3. Oven-Fried Parmesan Chicken Drumsticks Think you cant bite into a fried chicken leg if you have diabetes? Think again! The chicken drumsticks in this recipe are coated in a savory Parmesan cheese and breadcrumb crust. Theyre oven-baked instead of fried. Chicken drumsticks are higher in fat than chicken breasts, so be sure to balance your meal with low-fat sides. Drumsticks are still a great source of protein and much cheaper to buy. This recipe brings to mind apple-picking in early fall, but its tasty any time of year. Tart green apples and thyme are the perfect complements for boneless, skinless chicken breasts. Since the fiber in apples is a good carb that doesnt raise blood sugar levels, you can rest assured youre eating a healthy meal. A great roast chicken is a staple in many recipe arsenals. Its the perfect meal option for an elegant dinner party or a casual family dinner. For this recipe, apples, onions, garlic, and spices are stuffed into the cavity of a whole chicken. The chicken then gets an olive oil rub-down and is roasted to moist perfection. Make sure to peel off the skin before eating the meat. Use the leftovers to create a healthy chicken salad made with Greek yogurt and celery. 6. Marinated Grilled Chicken with Zucchini If youve got raw chicken in the fridge, a bumper crop of zucchini, and a grill, then youve got the makings of a healthy dinner. After being marinated in a blend of clementine orange juice, olive Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

Protein is an essential macronutrient (that means it's a large nutrient; the other two macronutrients are fat and carbohydrate) that your body needs to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function, and they help some additional physiological processes. Usually, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes, and there are times when less protein is better. Daily Protein Intake As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 - 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein, which is the same amount suggested for a regular balanced diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates, and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, fish and seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. For example: One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein One cup black beans has 15 grams protein An egg has 6 grams protein One cup low-fat milk has 8 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein High Protein Diets and Diabetes Switching to a high-protein diet may seem like it should make a difference in blood sugar regulation, but the protein probably doesn't help much at all, at least for the long term. According to an evidence review done by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, increasing protein intake doesn't appear to have any appreciable impact on how your sugar is digested or absorbed. And it doesn't have any long-term effects on your blood sugar or insulin requirements.​​ So if a person with diabetes switches to a high-protein diet, any therapeutic benefit is p Continue reading >>

Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Continue reading >>

Meat And Diabetes

Meat And Diabetes

Singer Chaka Khan says she reversed her Type 2 diabetes with a vegan diet. We know from several studies that vegetarian and vegan (no meat, fish, eggs, dairy, or honey) diets help prevent, control, and even reverse diabetes. But how do they do that? Neal Barnard, MD, founder of the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, is probably the leading advocate for medical veganism. He says that animal fats cause diabetes; that they block cells’ insulin receptors. He says insulin is like a key, opening a lock to get glucose into cells. Fats are like chewing gum stuck in the keyhole so insulin can’t work. Barnard cites data tracking the rise of diabetes in Japan. He shows how closely this rise follows the introduction of the meaty American diet, so he blames the meats for the diabetes. Some studies back him up. An article in Diabetes Care in 2002 reported that “A large body of experimental data generated in laboratory animals strongly supports the notion that high-fat diets are associated with impaired insulin action.” But many disagree. Quinn Phillips wrote here last year about studies showing people given vegan diets reduced their A1C and their diabetes medicines. Quinn got some interesting comments. Reader VegLowCarbDiabetic wrote, I adjusted my…diet to a very low-carb, high-good-fats (olive, coconut, avocado) [diet] with moderate protein [—] mostly from eggs, nuts, and fermented homemade organic raw milk products, such as kefir and strained yogurt, [as well as] fish oils… My A1C went from 11.5 down to 5.5 currently. Note that this is not a vegan diet — it includes eggs, dairy, and fish oil — but it does not include meat. So was it the decreased animal fat that lowered his A1C? Commenter Glen says no: Any glycemic changes in a vegan diet are usually t Continue reading >>

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

Eating At Restaurants With Diabetes

How to keep your blood sugar in check when dining out. By the dLife Editors Going out to eat is fraught with challenges for people who need to watch their blood sugar. There’s the giant portion size issue, the unknown ingredients, and the “special-occasion effect.” That’s the way we tell ourselves it’s ok to make unhealthy choices on special occasions. Our idea of what constitutes a special occasion is pretty subjective. Here are some tips on making d-friendly choices in restaurants, by type of cuisine. What to Order at Italian Restaurants Italian restaurants can be full of high-carbohydrate foods like bread, pasta, pizza, risotto, and gnocci. Many of these combine refined carbs with processed meats like sausage and pepperoni, and batters or breading (think eggplant Parmesan or fried mozzarella). Things you can do: Ask your server to skip the bread basket for your table. If you’re going to splurge and have pasta, ask for it as a side dish and don’t eat more than the size of your fist. That’s one cup of pasta, or about 45 grams of carbohydrate. Order unbreaded chicken or veal baked with sauces like piccata, marsala, puttanesca, francese, or cacciatore. Other good choices include: Caesar salad with grilled or baked fish, escarole and beans, and minestrone soup. What to Order at Mexican Restaurants Mexican food can be full of carbohydrates with large portions of rice, beans, and tortillas. Things you can do: At the very least, limit portion sizes. Ask to have half your plate wrapped to go before you even start eating. Skip the rice; ask for black beans or salad in its place. If you love chips and salsa, take a handful and then ask for the basket to be removed from the table. Order soft chicken or fish tacos and eat the fillings with a fork, skipping the tor Continue reading >>

Preparation And Benefits Of Chicken For Type 1 And 2 Diabetics

Preparation And Benefits Of Chicken For Type 1 And 2 Diabetics

Healthy Diet Plans >> Diabetic Diet >> Chicken Diabetes is a common disease that is on the increase worldwide. It is a common cause of death in the United States and has no known cure. There are two types of diabetes known as type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. It is a condition where the body cannot manufacture its own insulin (type 1 diabetes) or cannot make use of the insulin (type 2 diabetes). Insulin is a hormone that is required by the body to convert glucose into energy. With diabetics, the inability of the body to convert glucose to energy, results in elevated levels of sugar in the blood. Type 2 diabetes is by far the more common variety, affecting about 90% to 95% of all diabetics. Many diabetics develop secondary illnesses like coronary heart disease and kidney disorders. Diet plays a very important role in managing blood sugar levels. A healthy well balanced diet along with regular exercise can help diabetics lead a healthy normal life and can even prevent its development. Studies have shown that a diabetic diet should contain a high proportion of fruits and green leafy vegetables along with lean white meats like chicken and fish. Chicken is good for diabetic patients because of its low fat content. The high fat content in red meats causes elevated levels of cholesterol which can lead to blockages in the arteries resulting in coronary heart disease. Diabetics are at a higher risk of developing coronary heart disease and should replace red meat in their diets with lean white meats like chicken. This has a beneficial effect on both the heart and the kidneys, two organs that are at greater risk in diabetics. Fried, Baked & Grilled Chicken For Diabetics The method of preparing the chicken is also important. Fried chicken is not good for diabetics, especially t Continue reading >>

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

I Have Diabetes…what Can I Eat?

From the day you are diagnosed with diabetes, type 1 or type 2, everyone around you is going start telling you what you can and cannot eat. Your doctor, friends, brother, mother, father, uncle, children, spouse, and even the television and every magazine and newspaper! (Be wary of the all the diet fads that will not be directed right at you!) By the time you’ve heard it all, you might feel like there’s nothing you’re allowed to eat except for steamed chicken and spinach. Here are three secrets for your life with diabetes around food: Despite what everyone is saying you “can’t” and “shouldn’t” eat, you are the one who puts the food in your mouth…which means you actually can eat anything, in a sense. It is your choice, and while we all would be better if we always chose the healthiest foods, try reminding yourself of this statement: “I can choose to eat whatever I want.” Thinking this way around your choices versus feeling like you aren’t allowed to eat practically anything can be a very helpful tool for feeling more empowered around food. No one can control what you eat except for you. It’s your choice. As people with diabetes, we do want to aim for 70 to 90 percent of the day’s choices to be very healthy, moderate to low in carbohydrates, and whole food choices, but you do not have to be perfect! Enjoying a treat (whether it’s potato chips or chocolate) in moderation is possible, but the key is moderation. Sometimes, putting too many rules around those treats can make us want more and more of them, which is why the way you think about food is going to very important for how you behave around food. Think about the treats you love the most and how to incorporate them carefully and in sensible portions in your week’s nutrition. Never stop Continue reading >>

Eating Meat, Chicken May Double Risk Of Diabetes: Study

Eating Meat, Chicken May Double Risk Of Diabetes: Study

Eating meat, chicken may double risk of diabetes: study Meats contain saturated fatty acids which which if consumed is harmful Saturated and animal fats should be substituted with those found in vegetable sources such as olive oil and nuts. (Photo: Pixabay) Washington D.C.: A steady consumption of vegetables, olive oil and moderate amounts of protein will keep you healthy! As consuming animal products and animal meat may double their chance of developing Type-2 diabetes, warns a study. The findings showed that those participants who consumed higher amounts of saturated fatty acids and animal fat had a two fold higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes than those participants with a lower intake of saturated and animal fat.This study appeared in the scientific journal The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Researchers Universitat Rovira i Virgili in Spain's Tarragona evaluated the associations between total and subtypes of fat intake and the risk of Type-2 diabetes.They analysed data from 3,349 participants, who were free of diabetes at baseline but at high cardiovascular risk.In addition, they have evaluated the relationship between food sources rich in saturated fatty acids and the incidence of type 2 diabetes.After 4.5 years of follow-up, 266 participants developed diabetes. The results indicated that consumption of 12 grams per day of butter was associated with a two fold higher risk of diabetes after 4.5 years of follow-up, whereas the intake of whole-fat yogurt was associated with a lower risk.These findings emphasize the healthy benefits of a Mediterranean diet for preventing chronic diseases, particularly Type-2 diabetes, and the importance of substituting saturated and animal fats, especially red and processed meat for those found in vegetable sources such Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

What Can You Eat If You Have Diabetes? Foods To Eat & Avoid

Through twenty-five years of working with people with diabetes, when they come in for diabetes education, their first question is most often “What can I eat (or drink).” The next question is often, “What can’t I eat (or drink)? In this article, we will explore what foods are best to eat when you have just been diagnosed with Pre-Diabetes, and Type 2 Diabetes, and what foods are best avoided. Quick Links (click to jump to specific section) There is no other guide available on the internet that will guide you through the best foods to choose, and the best foods to avoid. Take heed, as some foods in the American diet are detrimental. These are also the same foods that Americans are addicted to. On occasion, you will be able to eat from the foods to avoid list, such as on a holiday, or your birthday. It shouldn’t become a regular occurrence to eat foods that are best avoided if you have Pre-Diabetes or Type 2 Diabetes. Also, eating healthier throughout your lifespan, can prevent Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes from ever surfacing at all. Starting to eat a healthy diet can help you to reverse your Pre-Diabetes, along with regular physical activity, and sometimes medication (most often Metformin). You can either get Type 2 Diabetes in good control, or you can reverse it to a Pre-Diabetes state in some cases, if you work on healthy lifestyle changes. Though it’s not always possible to reverse Type 2 Diabetes, it is certainly worth a shot. My new book to come out soon, entitled, “The Practical Guide for the Reversal of Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes,” published by The Diabetes Council, will explore this topic in depth. Stay tuned! Eating appropriate foods Knowing which foods to eat, and which ones to avoid, can help you to manage your blood sugars, and avoid Continue reading >>

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