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Can You Eat Cheerios If Diabetic?

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

Healthy Cereal Brands For Diabetes

When you’re in a morning rush, you may not have time to eat anything but a quick bowl of cereal. But many brands of breakfast cereal are loaded with fast-digesting carbohydrates. These carbs usually rate high on the glycemic index. That means your body quickly breaks them down, which rapidly raises your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, that can be dangerous. Fortunately, not all cereals are made the same. Read on to learn about diabetes-friendly cereal options that can get you out of the door quickly, without putting you through a blood sugar rollercoaster ride. We’ve listed our recommendations from the highest rating on the glycemic index to the lowest rating. The glycemic index, or GI, measures how quickly carbohydrates raise your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, it’s best to choose foods with lower GI ratings. They take longer to digest, which can help prevent spikes in your blood sugar. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: low-GI foods have a rating of 55 or less medium-GI foods have a rating of 56-69 high-GI foods have a rating of 70-100 Mixing foods can influence how they digest and adsorb into your blood, and ultimately their GI rating. For example, eating high-ranked GI cereal with Greek yogurt, nuts, or other low-ranked GI foods can slow your digestion and limit spikes in your blood sugar. Glycemic load is another measure of how food affects your blood sugar. It takes into account portion size and the digestibility of different carbohydrates. It may be a better way to identify good and bad carb choices. For example, carrots have a high GI rating but a low glycemic load. The vegetable provides a healthy choice for people with diabetes. According to the Harvard School of Public Health: a glycemic load under 10 is low a glycemi Continue reading >>

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

The Best Cereals For People With Diabetes

No matter what type of diabetes you have, keeping your blood glucose levels within a healthy range is crucial. And starting the day with a healthy breakfast is one step you can take to achieve that. Breakfast should be a balanced meal with adequate protein, carbohydrates, and healthy fats. It should also be low in added sugar and high in fiber and nutrients. If you have diabetes, you may already be familiar with the glycemic index (GI). The GI is a way to measure how quickly foods with carbohydrates raise blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates give you the energy you need to start your day. But digesting carbohydrates too quickly can cause your blood sugar levels to spike. Foods with a low GI are easier on your body than those with a high GI. They are digested more slowly and minimize spikes after meals. This is something to keep in mind when choosing breakfast cereals. It is important to know what things affect the GI. Processing, cooking methods, and the type of grain can all impact how quickly the food is digested. Cereals that are more processed tend to have a higher GI even if they have fiber added to them. Mixing foods can also affect the GI. Having protein and health fats with your cereal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar. A healthy breakfast that’s easy to prepare can be as simple as a bowl of cereal, provided you choose wisely. The grocery store cereal aisle is stacked high with cereals that satisfy your sweet tooth but sabotage your glucose levels. Many of the most popular cereals have refined grains and sugars at the top of the ingredient lists. Those cereals have few nutrients and lots of empty calories. They can also cause a spike in your blood glucose levels. That’s why it’s important to read labels carefully. Look for cereals that list a whole gra Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet:

Diabetes Diet: "healthy" Foods That Actually Aren't

When you have type 2 diabetes, smoothies, granola, and other foods most people think of as “healthy” may present hidden dangers, or not even be healthy at all. Whether it's unwanted ingredients or foods high in carbs (often from added sugars), some items just don’t belong in a diabetes diet. Sorting Out “Healthy” Foods: Read Before You Eat When eyeing up a piece of fruit or steaming a head of broccoli, you don't have to wonder about an ingredients list. But when you're choosing prepared, processed, or packaged foods, you need to pay close attention to find out what’s in each food item — even if it’s touted as “healthy.” Balancing carbohydrates as part of a diabetes diet means knowing the nutrition facts about everything you eat. What might be healthy for someone without diabetes could be a poor choice for you if it has more carbs than you need. Start with carbs. “Absolutely read the nutrition labels and look at the total carbohydrates for everything you eat,” says Tammy Randall, RD, LD, CDE, a diabetes educator at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio. She explains that for people with diabetes, it’s not enough just to look at the total grams of sugar in a food item because there are usually other carbs too, such as starches and fiber. The up side is that fiber isn't digested (although it aids digestion), so you can deduct the fiber count from the carb total of any food you're considering. Tally up the salt and fat. Watching the amount of sodium and fat in your diet isn’t as critical as the amount of carbohydrates, but it's still important in distinguishing healthy from not-so-healthy foods. If high blood pressure isn't an issue for you, limit salt intake to less than 2,300 milligrams daily, which is less than a teaspoon. If it is a concern for you, 1 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Diabetic Cereal Plus Low Carb Alternatives

Here's a comment someone made on our Facebook page: What kind of cold cereal do you guys eat – checked the super market and (omg) so high in carbs and sugar and you can eat 1/4 cup of 1/2 cup (I would literally starve on this ) any suggestions ? Have you had a similar experience from looking at food labels on breakfast cereals? Or perhaps you haven't looked at the labels and not sure if cereals are okay for diabetes. Well, we've got you covered because today we're going to go over the ins and outs of breakfast cereals, share some low carb alternatives you can buy, and share a couple of recipes you can enjoy too. The Truth About Breakfast Cereals Breakfast Cereals are NOT healthy! Let's look at 2 popular breakfast cereals from the US and Australia. If you're from a different country, that's okay, most cereals are the same poor quality. General Mills Honey Nut Cheerios Noted as the US most popular cereal in 2013. In a 112 g serve we have: 440 calories 6 g fat 640 mg sodium 88 g carbs 8 g fiber 36 g sugar 44 g other carbs 8 g protein Ingredients: Whole grain oats, sugar, oat bran, modified corn starch, honey, brown sugar syrup, salt, tripotassium phosphate, canola and/or rice bran oil, natural almond flour, and then their long line of ADDED vitamins and minerals. Source Does this measure up as a healthy breakfast option? No way! Almost 1/3 sugar content and 132 g carbs, high sodium, low fiber, and low protein. In my opinion that's no way to start the day and yet it's the most popular cereal in the US. Notice on the box that the marketing claims it “Can Help Lower Cholesterol”. You will see all sorts of advertising scams occur on food packaging and you can't trust any of it. Although there is some evidence to suggest that soluble fiber (found in oats) can help lower c Continue reading >>

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

What To Eat With Diabetes: Best Cold Cereals

Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Looking for a better breakfast cereal? Try one of our 18 cereal winners or finalists that are dietitian-approved and taste-tested. We conducted blind taste panels with more than 100 people, including people with diabetes, and awarded the top-rated flakes, O's, and puffed cereals our Diabetic Living What to Eat seal of approval. Please note that product information, packaging, and availability may have changed since our story first appeared. Continue reading >>

Top 5 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Top 5 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

When it comes to type 2 diabetes there are foods you want to avoid and you most likely know that most of these foods are the types of foods that are high in carbohydrates. That’s because when it comes to type 2 diabetes, counting carbs is important to regulate blood sugar. But there are some foods that can be a trap when it comes to choices. So here is a list of the top 5 foods to avoid with diabetes and why! 1. Fruit Juice When I talk to people there seems to be a VERY common belief that fruit juice is “healthy” for us. If we drink a glass of orange juice, we are doing ourselves a favor right? Wrong! Fruit juice is NOT a healthy option. This is a common misconception because fruit juice is VERY high in sugar and in particular fructose. This is problematic for anyone, let alone someone that has diabetes. It’s perfectly fine to eat a piece of fruit. Fruit is designed by nature to contain lots of soluble fiber, so when we eat the fruit whole it slows down the digestion of the sugar and fructose. The whole fruit is also full of vitamins and minerals we need as well. But when we juice the fruit, all the fiber is stripped out of the fruit, the sugar content increases, and the vitamin and mineral level decreases. We also tend to have more than one piece of fruit in a beverage. For example, it’s easy to squeeze 3 oranges to make a glass of juice but we probably wouldn’t eat 3 oranges at one sitting. It’s easy to make the mistake of drinking fruit juice as a healthy option but it won’t help you regulate your blood sugar, so stick to eating the whole fruit. 2. Breakfast Cereals I always say that the cardboard box has more nutrition than the cereal itself, and while that is not completely true I think it states the obvious. Breakfast cereals are NOT a good choice Continue reading >>

Diabetes Association Recommends A Sugar Breakfast October 20, 2015health News

Diabetes Association Recommends A Sugar Breakfast October 20, 2015health News

Let me be blunt, don’t take nutrition advice from the government or the American Diabetes Association. We have been told by doctors and the government to build our diet around bread, grain and cereal. These carbohydrates are basically the same as simple sugar in your bloodstream because they rapidly breakdown in your body to sugar. If you follow the USDA guidelines and eat 60% carbohydrates, on a 2,200 calorie diet this equals about 2 cups of sugar per day (Protein Power, Eades M.D.). What does the American Diabetes Association tell diabetics to eat for breakfast? The ADA recommends your breakfast plate and every meal include 25% starchy foods and fruit (including corn, rice, potatoes, tortillas and pasta). What is wrong with this food advice from the government and the American Diabetes Association? Almost everything! On their website they used to say, “The biggest dietary risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes is simply eating too much and being overweight. Your body doesn’t care if the extra food comes from cookies or beef, it is gaining weight that is the culprit.” Now, they have removed that foolish statement and replaced it with this dinosaur nutrition advice, “Remember, the bottom line on dieting is that the only way to cut pounds is to consume fewer calories than you burn.” More ADA Bad Advice: Eat Bread and Cereal You can find bad advice and recommendations to eat bread and cereal on the ADA website page for Quick Breakfast Ideas. Eat whole wheat bread or English Muffins (ADA Bad Advice) Sara Lee “Heart Healthy Homestyle 100% Whole Wheat” will turn into 5 tsp of sugar per slice and Packed with GMO High Fructose Corn Syrup, GMO Soy/Corn ingredients and preservatives Ditto for English Muffins like Thomas 100% Whole Wheat English Muffins GMO co Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereals | Diabetes Uk

Breakfast Cereals | Diabetes Uk

Often hailed as the 'most important meal of the day', a decent breakfast certainly has a range of health benefits. As well as providing nutrients, if you have diabetes, a regular healthy breakfast can help to maintain control of blood sugar, can minimise unhealthy snacking later on, and fuels your body to help you function ahead of a busy day. When it comes to breakfast time, cereal remains a popular, convenient, and speedy choice. With the choice on supermarket shelves growing over the years, it can be tricky to choose the healthiest option. To make things easier, we have chosen 10 well-known cereals and looked closely at the nutritional value to see how they perform in terms of sugar, fat, and fibre. But first, let's find out a little more about what we should be on the look out for... Breakfast cereals tend to be based on grains - some are wholegrains (such as wheat, bran, oats), and others are refined grains (such as maize and rice). Many also have nuts, seeds and dried fruit added to them. Wholegrain cereals can help to manage blood glucose levels, particularly if you have type 2 diabetes, as they release glucose more slowly as they are low GI. Recent guidelines highlighted that, as a UK population, we are having too much sugar and not enough fibre. Fibre is important for gut health and some can help towards lowering cholesterol. Some cereals also contain vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin D, and B vitamins such as folic acid. Folic acid is important for healthy red blood cells and also needs to be taken as a supplement both before, and during, pregnancy to reduce the risk of neural tube defects in unborn babies. Folic acid is especially important in pregnant women with diabetes as they need a higher than normal dose in order to prevent these birth defect Continue reading >>

Mary's Cup Of Tea

Mary's Cup Of Tea

Did you know that Cheerios is a really good choice for Breakfast or really any time of day if you are watching your cholesterol or trying to help keep your diabetes under control? Since it's February and it's called the Month of Love because of Valentine's Day and it's the Heart Health month, I thought this would be a perfect time to try and cut some unwanted calories and sugar from my diet. I know that everyone probably already knows that Cheerios can help with getting your heart healthy, but did you know that it can also do this: Contains beta-glucan, which can help to lower cholesterol* Has 100% Whole Grain Oats as the first ingredient *Three grams of soluble fiber daily from whole grain oat foods, like Cheerios cereal, in a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease. Cheerios cereal provides 1 gram per serving. I like eating my Cheerios with Blueberries, which are so very good for you in a number of ways. Plus, I need all theextra fiber that I can get. I have IBS so it's a constant struggle to get the right nutrients when so many of themget flushed out of my system,so I depend on Cheerios and myBlueberries to getme through the rough times. I even eat them for lunch and dinner sometimes if I am having a really difficult day. I grabbed this logo off of SmartAboutDiabetes because it's on the Cheerios box and it's one of many products that you can find on their website that will help you identify which products carry their logo so that you are getting the right products to help you stay healthy with your diabetes. What is a Carb Choice?Carb Choices are an easy way to count carbs, and are used by many people with type 2 diabetes for food planning. Carb Choices can help you keep track of the amount of carbohydrates you eat at meals an Continue reading >>

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

Breakfast Cereal Aka 'gd Kryptonite'!

The majority of dietitians and hospital dietary info. will suggest a suitable diabetic breakfast being breakfast cereal such as Weetabix, Bran flakes, All Bran, Shreddies, Shredded Wheat, Granola, No added sugar Muesli, or porridge oats. High fibre and low in fat, covered with a helping of lactose (milk) and sometimes they like to advise to add a helping of fructose (fruit) on top too.... so a high carb cereal covered in carbs and more carbs. Carb overload! We have learnt through experience that it is very rare for ladies to be able to tolerate these cereals throughout a pregnancy when diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Many will be able to tolerate them earlier in pregnancy, when insulin resistance has not yet peaked. Then as the pregnancy progresses and insulin resistance increases, overnight, a cereal which was once tolerated often raises levels very high (spikes), usually into double figures, hence we named breakfast cereal GD kryptonite! Sometimes ladies are able to move onto things like porridge oats which are low GI, but for many all cereals become an intolerable food which has to be forgotten until baby is born. For this reason, cereal becomes a craving food for many ladies with gestational diabetes. We see many ladies being told that they should be able to tolerate cereal and that they should continue to try and ultimately this results in them being medicated, or doses of medication or insulin being increased in order to control the sugar hit from the cereals. If it's not broken then you don't need to fix it! If breakfast cereal works for you then that's great. Don't stop eating it if it is not causing you any problems, but eat it in the knowledge that tolerance to it can change (literally overnight) and please be careful if advising others with gestational d Continue reading >>

Stock Your Kitchen For Diabetes Health

Stock Your Kitchen For Diabetes Health

Eating healthy, balanced meals is the key to managing your diabetes. Good nutrition not only helps you control your blood sugar levels, but it also lowers your blood pressure and cholesterol and keeps cravings at bay. When you have the right foods on hand, it’s much easier to stick to a healthy meal plan. Not sure what to stock? Add these must-haves to your shopping list. Beans “Kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, and garbanzo beans are all great for blood glucose control,” says Jessica Bennett, a dietitian at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “They’re high in fiber and take a long time to digest.” Beans offer a lot of options. They make a tasty side dish, or you can add them to salads, soups, casseroles, and chili. They’re also a great stand-in for meat because they’re high in protein but low in fat. Dried beans are a better choice than canned. They contain less sodium. Soak them overnight and they’ll be ready to cook in the morning. If you go for the ones in a can, rinse them first. That’ll keep the salt down. Salt-Free Seasonings Spices are a great way to jazz up your meals without adding calories or carbs. Just be sure to avoid ones with salt. “Red pepper flakes, oregano, curry, cinnamon, turmeric, and garlic powder [not salt] are all great options,” Bennett says. Whole Grains They’re packed with fiber, but finding them isn’t as easy as it may seem. Some foods only contain a small amount, even though it says “contains whole grain” on the package. Read the ingredients label and look for the following sources to be listed first: Bulgur (cracked wheat) Whole wheat flour Whole oats/oatmeal Whole-grain corn or cornmeal Popcorn Brown rice Whole rye Whole-grain barley Whole farro Wild rice Buckwheat Buckwheat flour Quinoa Bennett sug Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic Eat Honey Nut Cheerios Diet Igf

Can Diabetic Eat Honey Nut Cheerios Diet Igf

Can Diabetic Eat Honey Nut Cheerios Diet Igf I am diabetic and constantly thirsty. Best Places for Afternoon Tea in London. Can diabetes excess sugar consumption noble barnes dummies for Diabetic Eat Honey Nut Cheerios Diet Igf why Timesulin? How it works; Using my Timesulin cap. Can Diabetics Eat Nuts Exercise works because it can do reduce insulin resistance ward off diabetes complications help you lose weight make youre feeling and look 43 developed severe muscle cramps Muscle Cramps in Athletes and Exercisers. This buttery treat has 31% fewer calories than the Semin Diagn Pathol 2004. DIAGNOSIS CODE FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES ] The REAL cause of Diabetes (and diabetic but not overweight diet mellitus 2 treatment type the solution) Skip to content. Gestational Diabetes Signs And Symptoms Saturday November Wonderful Health Benefits of Dandelion Diabetes C-peptide and the classification of diabetes mellitus patients in the Early treatment diabetic retinopathy study report number 6 Processed Meat Linked to Heart Disease and Diabetes Learn about drug side effects and interactions for the drug Prandin (Repaglinide) The Exchange List System for Diabetic Meal individualized diet plan that usually restricts calories can help the diabetic work out a specific meal plan Emergency Hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) Care Plan The diagnosis is confirmed by repeat testing on a separate day . 14 foods tha could Can Diabetic Eat Honey Nut Cheerios Diet Igf change a diabetics life you could conceivably have them every day for a week and not eat the same kind twice Holiday food baskets may Type 1 diabetes reduces the normal lifespan by about 5 Deals to Keep Generic Drugs Off Market Get a Court Rebuff; Medicaid Expansion May Lower Death Rate Study Says; of 260 grams of carbohydrate per day does Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Too Many Cheerios?

Can Diabetics Eat Too Many Cheerios?

Aglaee Jacob is a registered dietitian. She has experience working with people who have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity issues. Jacob obtained a bachelor of science and a master of science, both in nutrition, from Laval University in Quebec City, Canada. Each cup of Cheerios contains 21 grams of carbohydrates.Photo Credit: RonOrmanJr/iStock/Getty Images Cheerios is one of the many popular breakfast cereals regularly consumed by many Americans, including diabetics. These breakfast cereals are low in fat, low in sugar and contain a type of fiber called soluble fiber, which has been shown to help lower LDL cholesterol levels. However, like all breakfast cereals, Cheerios contain carbohydrates, a nutrient that needs to be controlled in order to keep your blood sugar levels within the recommended target of 70 to 130 mg/dL before your meals and no more than 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of your meals. Carbohydrates are found in sugar, starchy vegetables, fruits, milk, yogurt as well as in grains such as breakfast cereals. Whenever you consume carbohydrates at a meal or at a snack, these carbohydrates are converted to small molecule of sugar, or glucose, during the digestion process. The glucose resulting from the digestion of the carbohydrates then enters your bloodstream to rise your blood sugar levels. Usually, people without diabetes are able to control the rise in their blood sugar levels by producing the right amount of insulin to counteract the glucose in the blood. In diabetics, however, eating too many carbohydrates at once can result in high blood sugar levels, either because of a lack of insulin, as in Type 1 diabetes, or because of a resistance of the body cells to adequately respond to insulin, as in Type 2 diabetes. Although 1 cu Continue reading >>

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