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Can You Drink Tomato Juice With Diabetes?

V-8 Juice Ok For Diabetes

V-8 Juice Ok For Diabetes

I occasional drink 1 small low sodium can when I feel I need potassium. 7 g carbs I think, as part of a meal (where I aim for 12-15g carbs) it is fine for me. D.D. Family T2 since 2005, Control via LCHF/Exercise, No Meds I used to love V-8 as well as American style tomato juice. The tomato juice in Korea and other parts of Asia is very sweet tasting and I hate it. Don't drink any of it though now as it's way over my carb budget. Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy I love the stuff, it is also my go to for adding to home made vegetable soup. Testing will tell you if you can do it, it may just be a portion control kind of thing. I keep the small cans, regular cans, and the big bottles in my pantry at all times. As April referred to: makes a great Bloody Mary mix if you drink, it is good with a dash of any hot sauce, stirred with a celery stick as a cocktail. I have also heated it and sipped it like a tomato soup, with a dash of Mrs Dash or celery flakes or seed. I drink 2 small cans at a time and it puts my BG down. It's not as friendly on my stomach as I'd like, not that it's that unfriendly but does make me feel a little acidic. V8 makes a wicked good Ceviche base... Mmmmmmm Low carbs little bay scallops and baby shrimp cooked in the juice of limes. Super small died jalepeno red onion and a few tomatoes peeled seeded and died. Really the sky is the limit your preference for Ceviche is your own. I guess you can really add any fishies, but these are my favies! 100grams of each is under 4 carbs little. I use a fondue type pronged fork and make sport of the meal in a big wine glass. There are so many recipes online it's way worth it to make it your own.... V8 really compliments like nothing else. Continue reading >>

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

Along with a diabetes-healthy diet, diabetics may consume certain fruit juices, but in moderation. Whole fruits, however, are a better and healthier choice than juices. Juice and Diabetes Juices, such as grapefruit juice, pineapple juice and orange juice, if taken in moderation, are considered appropriate for diabetics. All types of citrus fruit juices are superfood for diabetics as they are nutrient-rich, says American Diabetes Association (ADA). Apart from citrus juices, diabetics may also drink apple juice for it is rich in fibre, lemon juice as it is low on carbs, tomato juice as it is low on sugar content and carrot juice as it is juiced raw. All fruit juices, however, also contain significant amount of sugar, which can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Therefore, moderate consumption of fruit juices is advised. Carbs from juices also adds to your total intake of carbohydrates for the day. Having juice along with the meal can surely reduce the effects of sugar content of the juice. While citrus juices are low on Glycemic Index table, pineapple and orange juice is rated 46 and grapefruit juice is rated 48. Factors Diabetics should Consider Consumption of carbs present in the juices results in increased blood sugar levels, though the impact varies from individual to individual. Here are a few points that diabetics should consider if they wish to consume juices or other beverages. The recommended amount of a fruit or any other drink is 4 oz. per day. Drinking juices separately can lead to quicker spike in blood glucose level. Added sugar in the juices is a major concern for the diabetic’s well-being. Fruit and vegetable juice prepared with the original pulp is a good choice for diabetics. Two of the best juices for diabetics include apple and carrot juice. Recommen Continue reading >>

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

What Fruit Juice Can People With Diabetes Drink?

Tweet Fruit juice has, until recently, been considered a great way to get your five a day. people with diabetes need to moderate their fruit juice intake as larger glasses of juice can substantially raise blood sugar levels. The key is to In addition, more recently, regular consumption of fruit juice has been linked with an increase in type 2 diabetes risk. What's in fruit juice? Aside from vitamin C and calcium, fruit juice contains: Calories - 250ml glass of unsweetened orange juice typically contains around 100 calories, compared to the 60 calories in an actual orange Fructose (a form of sugar) - half a pint of fruit juice contains more sugar than the World Health Organisation recommends ideally having in a day (30g of sugar for men, 24g for women) A lack of fibre - juice always contains less fibre than whole fruit and highly processed juices may not contain any fibre How does this affect my diabetes? Badly, is the short answer. Sugar levels in fruit juice can cause a significant spike in blood sugar levels, increasing the risk of hyperglycemia. The glycemic index, which is used to reflect the impact on blood sugar levels of individual foods, places orange juice between 66 and 76 on a scale of 100. Compared to whole fruits and vegetables, juice doesn't offer much fibre. (it's stripped away in the juicing process). Fibre is a kind of carbohydrate that, because the body doesn't break it down, is calorie-free, so it doesn't affect your blood sugar, making it important for people with diabetes. Soluble fibre can help lower your cholesterol levels and improve blood glucose control if eaten in large amounts. Apples, oranges, and pears all contain soluble fibre, but not when juiced. Is fruit juice all bad for people with diabetes? Fruit juice has some benefits for people wi Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice Looks Good For Diabetics

Tomato Juice Looks Good For Diabetics

There's a particular kind of juice that may prove helpful for diabetics. Early research indicates that tomato juice may reduce blood platelet clumping in people with type 2 diabetes. Blood platelet clumping could contribute to heart attack or stroke under certain conditions, and diabetics are at increased risk for such heart problems. If you add tomato juice to your diet, go for low-sodium varieties. More research is needed to confirm the link between tomato juice consumption and decreased platelet aggregation. In a small study of approximately 20 patients with type 2 diabetes, drinking a small amount of clarified tomato juice daily appeared to inhibit platelet aggregation. Approximately 65% of people with diabetes die from complications of cardiovascular disease (CVD) such as heart attack and stroke. High blood glucose in diabetics damages blood vessels and contributes to high cholesterol and other lipid abnormalities. This, in turn, promotes clogged arteries, a condition otherwise known as atherosclerosis. Typical dietary guidelines for people with diabetes include eating antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, whole unrefined grains, low-fat dairy, and lean protein. Exercise is critical for blood sugar control and the prevention of cardiovascular disease as well. Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice Reduces Clotting In Diabetics

Tomato Juice Reduces Clotting In Diabetics

For people with type 2 diabetes, tomato juice may help stave off the heart troubles that often complicate the disease. Researchers have found that drinking tomato juice for three weeks had a blood-thinning effect in people with the disease. The juice reduced "platelet aggregation" — the blood’s ability to clot. If corroborated by larger studies, the finding may one day also help "individuals with increased clotting tendency such as smokers, long-distance air travelers (deep vein thrombosis), etcetera," said Manohar L. Garg, one of the authors of the letter detailing the results. Garg is an associate professor of nutrition and dietetics at the University of Newcastle in Australia. "When platelets aggregate, they form the plug that clots the vessels," explained Dr. Stuart Weiss, a clinical assistant professor of medicine at New York University School of Medicine. "In diabetes patients, platelets are more sticky." Platelets are responsible for the blood’s ability to clot which, in the case of an injury, is a good thing. Clotting can go too far, however, and cause strokes, heart attacks and other life-threatening problems. As a result of this excessive "stickiness," for instance, people with type 2 diabetes have an increased risk of atherosclerosis and cardiovascular problems, such as heart attack and stroke. Anti-clotting medications have been shown to reduce this risk. "In diabetes, there are a lot of pro-inflammatory markers that contribute to increasing platelet aggregation, so if there’s something we can do that can reverse or limit that, that would be a very positive thing," Weiss added. Consumption of tomato products has been shown to reduce the incidence of various heart ailments, so the researchers behind the research letter decided to test the hypothesis i Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice May Help Type 2 Diabetics

Tomato Juice May Help Type 2 Diabetics

Tomato juice may be the key to decreasing hyperactive platelet aggregation, which can lead to heart disease, according to the latest nutrition and dietetics study by HMRI researchers based at the University of Newcastle . Research conducted by Sherri Lazarus and Associate Professor Manohar Garg, published in an August edition of the Journal of American Medical Association, has found that over a three week period, the platelet activity in people with type 2 diabetes decreased when they took a dietary supplement of tomato juice. Study: Hot spots of type 1 diabetes found in food swamps "Diabetes is a multi-faceted disease with problems such as glucose intolerance, hypertension ( high blood pressure ), dislipidaemia (high cholesterol and high triglycerides) and the less talked about hyperactive platelets," says Sherri. "Aggregation is the clumping together and clotting of platelets. We looked at how susceptible the platelets were to clotting before and after the people with type 2 diabetes had taken tomato juice." "Platelets are the parts of blood responsible for the preservation of healthy blood vessels. When the health of blood vessels is impaired, as in the case of diabetes, platelets stick to the lining of the vessel wall and over time can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease." "Dietary strategies have been developed to address known cardiovascular risk factors, however, currently there is no dietary strategy aimed at reducing high platelet activity and this is the first time that tomato juice has been used in humans to reduce platelet activity." "We are looking for dietary solutions for people with type 2 diabetes rather than just popping pills. Larger randomised controlled trials are needed to determine whether the consumption of tomato juice can improve Continue reading >>

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Juices That Are Good For Type 2 Diabetics

Living with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) involves limiting foods that could raise blood sugar to high levels. Juice can be a part of an overall healthy diet in limited amounts. Keeping serving sizes to 4 ounces or less -- about 1/2 cup -- limits the carbohydrate load. Fruit juice is sometimes helpful to treat low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, due to the fast absorption of the sugar. The nutrient quality of juices varies, so it's helpful to know which juices are healthier choices. There are also alternatives to drinking plain juice that can help limit your carbohydrate intake. Video of the Day Vegetable juice is a lower-carbohydrate alternative to fruit juice. For example, a 4-ounce glass of a tomato-based vegetable juice contains 5.5 g of carbohydrate. However, a 4-ounce serving of a similar vegetable-fruit juice blend typically has 13.7 g of carbohydrate. Low-level inflammation is a contributing factor to insulin resistance and T2DM, particularly in people who are overweight. The authors of a June 2013 "British Journal of Nutrition" study report found that overweight and obese women experienced reduced inflammation after drinking about 1.5 cups of tomato juice daily for 3 weeks. These findings suggest that tomato-based vegetable juice and tomato juice can be good, low-carbohydrate juice options -- and might assist in reducing inflammation. When choosing a fruit juice, the American Diabetes Association recommends 100 percent fruit juice with no added sugar. Pomegranate, cranberry and grape juice all contain a high concentration of antioxidants, according to research published in January 2010 in "Nutrition Journal." Foods rich in antioxidants might help prevent or limit damage caused by an overabundance of free radicals, chemicals that can injure cells. Excess accumulation of Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice As Bedtime Snack In Diabetes

Tomato Juice As Bedtime Snack In Diabetes

Figuring out how to adapt what you eat and when is a big challenge for people who have been recently diagnosed with diabetes. Once you find something that works well, it makes sense to stick with it, as this reader did. Switching to Tomato Juice: Q. I used to eat yogurt, apples or oranges before I went to bed. I am a type 2 diabetic. Recently I changed to drinking tomato juice before bed. My morning blood sugar has been below 100 ever since. Before that, it was usually around 120. Could tomato juice be lowering my blood sugar? Less Sugar Before Bed: A. We are delighted to learn of your success with tomato juice. It might be due to less sugar in the juice compared to your previous bedtime snacks. A cup of yogurt, an apple and an orange each contain between 15 and 18 grams of carbohydrate, while 8 ounces of tomato juice contains about 10 grams. The few studies that have been done showed no effect of tomato juice or raw tomatoes on blood sugar (Diabetes Care, June, 2000; International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, May, 2011). What Else Can You Use to Manage Your Blood Sugar? There are many other non-drug approaches that can be valuable for people with type 2 diabetes, including a number of foods and spices. We are sending you our Guide to Managing Diabetes with our 10 key steps for keeping blood sugar in check. Bitter melon (Momordica charantia) is an Indian vegetable that lowers blood sugar. Tomatoes can be used in a tasty sauce that makes bitter melon much more appealing (Nutrition Journal, July 28, 2011). Learn more about bitter melon, cinnamon, vinegar, nopal cactus and fenugreek for helping control blood sugar in our Guide to Managing Diabetes. You will also get the straight and skinny on the best veggies for blood sugar control and the pros and cons of popu Continue reading >>

Tomato Juice In The Morning: Are You Aware Of The Benefits?

Tomato Juice In The Morning: Are You Aware Of The Benefits?

Tomato Juice in the Morning: Are You Aware of the Benefits? From your skin to your heart, and even your immune system, your entire body will benefit from tomato juice, because it is rich in vitamins and minerals Here on the blog, we frequently talk about the important benefits of drinking  a room temperature glass of water with lemon in the morning , or a medicinal spoonful of olive oil with a few drops of lemon juice. But did you know that tomato juice is also incredibly healthy? This is just another option when it comes to starting out your day, that moment when it is crucial that you get a good dose of vitamins and minerals that will strengthen your body so you can live the day with as much energy as possible. Don’t hesitate to include a glass of tomato juice as a part of your breakfast routine. You’ll love it, and it will do wonders for your health! Why is it good to drink a glass of tomato juice in the morning? 1. Tomato juice, anti-oxidant and purifier Tomatoes are often included in weight loss diets. One of the biggest benefits of consuming tomatoes is that they are great at purifying your body and getting rid of excess liquids, as well as toxins that make you feel swollen, tired and heavy. Tomatoes are very low-calorie and make an excellent diuretic , capable of activating your metabolism, which can help you burn more fat. If you frequently drink tomato juice in the morning, you’ll be able to start the day off better, although you should definitely combine this beverage with a varied and balanced breakfast. In other words, you shouldn’t leave the house after only drinking “a single glass of juice.” You need to add a bit of fiber and protein, and some kind of fruit, such as a green apple. This will help purify your body and burn fat. It’s Continue reading >>

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

Should I Drink Fruit Juice?

If my blood glucose goes low, drinking orange juice can help raise it. But how about drinking orange juice when my blood sugar level is normal? I’m concerned that it will raise my sugar too much. So I’ve been staying away from fruit juices and just eat the fruit itself. Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Vegetable Juice With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Drink Vegetable Juice With Type 2 Diabetes?

Juicing – both fruit juice and vegetable juice – is a popular health trend that claims to offer valuable benefits. After all, you're running whole fruits and vegetables through a juice machine. This liquefies the produce and removes most of the pulp and fiber, creating a smooth beverage that makes it easy for you to drink your nutrients. But, is juicing as healthy as it sounds? Particularly if you have type 2 diabetes? Well, the answer mostly depends on what you put in your juice! For instance, if you use only apples in your recipe, then your juice won’t really be diabetic friendly because apples are high in carbs and you'll be chugging down straight sugar. We've written previously on fruit juicing over here – and that's not something we recommend for you as a diabetic. But, if you purchase or make a juice that is heavy in leafy greens and other non starchy vegetables, and contains a small portion of low carb fruits, then you’ve got a great supplement to drink on the odd occasion. Drinking vegetable juice can be a good way to get in those daily vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants… just as long as you do it the right way! Store bought vs. homemade juice comparison Thankfully, juicing has become so common that you can walk into almost any grocery store and find juice made of vegetables, fruits, or a mixture of both. Health food stores and specialty stores may have fresh juice made in house, which is usually located in the refrigerator section. Or you can find a can or bottle of juice like V8 pretty much anywhere, even at convenience stores! So, is store bought juice any less healthy for you than homemade juice? The answer: not really. In theory, fresh juice is better for you, but you can buy a premade juice that contains just as much nutrition – if you choo Continue reading >>

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing For Diabetics – Just A Myth Or Can It Really Help You?

Juicing works amazingly well for all sorts of conditions. It can help add nutrients, increase overall caloric intake, and helps stomach problems. But, can juicing really help diabetes? This is a question that we’re going to answer. For most people, they don’t have to worry too much about the finer details of juicing. They don’t have to worry about how many carbohydrates they take in, and can juice whatever they want to. Diabetics, on the other hand, have to be very concerned with a number of sugars they take in. And unfortunately, juicing tends to concentrate sugars. So, diabetics really need to pay attention to the type of juices they use and the quantity. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition that causes the person to lose their pancreas function because of the autoimmune system attacks and destroys the islet cells that produce insulin. Type 1 diabetes most often occurs between the ages of 4 and 10, but anyone can be affected by type 1 diabetes. This type of diabetes cannot be cured. Because type 1 diabetics do not have pancreas function or have very minimal pancreas function that’s declining, they have to rely on an external source of insulin. For every sugar molecule they take in, they have to inject a corresponding amount of insulin. We won’t go into how much insulin it takes because every person is different. So, when juicing, type 1 diabetics have to know how many sugars they will be taking in. That way, they can take an appropriate amount of insulin to metabolize the sugars. Type 2 diabetes is a lifestyle condition that is caused by a person consuming too many sugars for too long. The pancreas has worked so hard for so long, that it is worn out. The over-consumption of sugars has also caused the body to become resistant to its own insulin and this Continue reading >>

Ingredient: Lower-sodium Tomato Juice

Ingredient: Lower-sodium Tomato Juice

Photograph by Kyle Dreier, styling by Whitney Kemp Did you know that lower-sodium tomato or vegetable juice makes a convenient soup base? This creamy soup uses a ready-to-drink beverage plus diced fresh tomatoes for a double dose of flavor. Got tomato juice? Enjoy it or veggie juice with a Hold-the-Mayo Tuna Salad Sandwich for a tasty, light lunch (serve the sandwich open-faced on half of an English muffin and save 15 grams of carbohydrate). Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Daily Tomato Juice Eases Diabetic Symptoms

Daily Tomato Juice Eases Diabetic Symptoms

They found significant lowering of platelet aggregation - the blood's ability to clot - after a daily dose of juice for three weeks, according to the research letter in this week's JAMA​ (Aug 18;292(7):805-6). Diabetic patients are more prone to blood clots, which contributes to their increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications, according to the authors. Blood clots can cause strokes, heart attacks and other life-threatening problems. In the trial, 20 patients (aged 43-82) with type 2 diabetes drank either 250 ml of tomato juice or a placebo - tomato-flavoured drink - everyday for three weeks. They had no prior history of clotting problems and were not taking aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or other medications that might influence clotting. Platelet aggregation turned out to be significantly lower at the end of the trial for the group drinking tomato juice. There was no significant difference in platelet aggregation in the placebo group. The researchers from the University of Newcastle in Australia do not yet understand why tomato juice reduces platelet aggregation, although other groups have reported similar results. In the UK, nutraceutical firm Provexis is currently developing a water-soluble, concentrated tomato extract that can be added to drinks to make them beneficial for heart health. Trials on the extract, which contains none of the antioxidant lycopene, also reported to improve heart health, suggest that its different compounds inhibit blood platelet aggregation.Nobody at the company was available to comment on the Australian research. Diabetes has already increased by one-third during the 1990s, due to the prevalence of obesity and an ageing population. There are currently more than 194 million people with diabetes worldwide but Continue reading >>

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