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Can You Drink A Glass Of Wine While Taking Metformin?

Why No Alcohol With Metformin?

Why No Alcohol With Metformin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. On my Metformin bottle it says to avoid alcohol while taking this drug. Anyone know the real reason why? My pharmacist couldn't really answer that and my Endo. couldn't give me a real good answer either. She just said that she thought it was because Metformin works with the liver and that alcohol also messes with the liver and that's the only reason she could think of. But she didn't seem to think it was a big concern unless you were overdoing it with the alcohol. Anyway, does someone know the real reason they put that on the label? Looking for a more technical description of why I can't take both at the same time. I googled "metformin and alcohol interaction," and the link said that alcohol increases the lactic acid production. Since lactic acidosis icould be a possible side effect of metformin in some individuals, drinking a lot of alcohol with it might mean a "double whammy," if you were prone to the lactic acidosis. I have a drink or two and am on metformin, and have had no problems. I think most meds have the alcohol warning on the label. Same reason Grapefruit Juice is on that list. Rare complications. If you already have kidney problems, then Ketosis is a possibility with Met and alcohol. But ... if you have kidney problems, alcohol is likely already on the no-no list! If your pharmacist didn't know, they need to have their license taken away! But ... don't listen to some stranger like me. I only know what I read about it, and that may be un-true! Ask your doctor who prescribed it. My understanding was as you say... they both work on the Liver. Here is my question. I have enjoyed 1-2 g Continue reading >>

What Should I Know Before Taking Metformin?

What Should I Know Before Taking Metformin?

Can I drink alcohol while taking metformin? Although alcohol doesn't actually affect the medicine itself, you should avoid drinking alcohol while you are taking metformin, becauses it can increase the risk of getting low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) and lactic acidosis (see below for details). Can I drive while taking metformin? Metformin does not affect your ability to drive. However, if you are taking other medicines for diabetes with metformin this can sometimes cause low blood sugar levels (see below). Symptoms may include feeling faint or tired, confusion and difficulty concentrating, which may affect your ability to drive safely. If you are taking metformin with other medicines for type 2 diabetes you should discuss this with your doctor. Do I need to avoid any food or drinks while taking metformin? There are no foods or drinks you specifically need to avoid while taking metformin. However, it is important to continue to follow the diet and exercise advice given to you by your nurse or doctor. Metformin only helps to control your blood sugar levels and should not be used as a substitute for eating healthily and taking regular exercise. What side effects should I look out for while taking metformin? When used on its own, metformin does not usually cause low blood sugar levels (hypoglycaemia). However, you may sometimes get low blood sugar if you take metformin in combination with other antidiabetic medicines. If this applies to you, you should make sure you know what to do if you experience the symptoms of hypoglycaemia (these may include cold sweats, cool pale skin, tremor, anxious feeling, unusual tiredness or weakness, confusion, difficulty in concentration, excessive hunger, temporary vision changes, headache or nausea). Discuss this with your GP, pharmacist or Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

Diabetes And Alcohol: Do The Two Mix? (part 1)

A nice glass of Chianti…a cold beer on a hot summer day…celebrating with a flute of champagne. There are so many ways that alcohol is integrated into both everyday life and special occasions. Granted, not everyone drinks alcohol, but many people do. And when it comes to the question, "Can I drink alcohol if I have diabetes?" the answer is about as clear as that for "Is a low-carb diet good for diabetes?" In other words, the answer really is, "It depends!" It’s important to mention right off the bat that there are certainly many reasons why people should not drink alcohol. Some may be related to diabetes and some may be related to other reasons. Therefore, it’s important to discuss this issue with your health-care provider if you have any doubts or concerns. And if you’re newly diagnosed with diabetes or starting on a new medicine, it’s worthwhile bringing up the topic if your provider doesn’t. While you’d be hard-pressed to find any health organization actually recommending that you drink alcohol, you might take some comfort in knowing that the American Diabetes Association, the American Heart Association, and even the American Cancer Society agree that drinking alcohol in moderation is certainly not off-limits to most people. But back to diabetes and alcohol. What’s the concern here? And why should some people with diabetes not drink alcohol? To answer these questions, it’s helpful to understand a little bit about how alcohol is processed in the body. The body treats alcohol as a drug, not as a food product. This means that, when you drink any type of alcoholic beverage, your liver kicks into high gear, preparing itself to “detoxify” the body of this “poison” (I’m using these words for dramatic effect). Essentially, the liver has to metabo Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Alcohol While On Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While On Metformin?

Home Q & A Questions Can you drink alcohol while... Can you drink alcohol while on metformin? If you're diabetic then you have to be careful of the drinks you have, because of sugar. The interaction checker says Ask your doctor before using ethanol together with metFORMIN. Taking this combination may cause a condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these symptoms of lactic acidosis: weakness, increasing sleepiness, slow heart rate, cold feeling, muscle pain, shortness of breath, stomach pain. Use alcohol cautiously. If your doctor prescribes these medications together, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safey take this combination. It is important to tell your doctor about all other medications you use, including vitamins and herbs. Do not stop using any medications without first talking to your doctor. Having one drink for women (12 oz beer, 5 oz glass of wine and 0.5-1 oz hard liquor means one drink) or two drinks (same measurements except for hard alcohol can be only 1 1/2 oz liquor between two drinks) for men is usually permissible but you must consider the drink as a sugar/carb in your diet. Alcohol becomes pure glucose in your body, just like eating a high carb/sugar dessert. If you have alcohol, have it with a meal or snack (be sure to adjust for the alcohol's added carbs so you will need to reduce carbs somewhere else in the diet). One effect of alcohol is that it shuts off your liver from releasing stored glucose from your liver into your blood stream which increases the likelihood of experiencing low blood sugar. Many of the symptoms of low blood sugar resemble intoxication (like dizziness, slurred speech, blurred vision, muscle weakness and a shaky feeling). If you are on insulin or pills, the medication Continue reading >>

Metformin And Alcohol

Metformin And Alcohol

Tweet It is generally recommended that people not use metformin and alcohol at the same time. Taking metformin and alcohol together can increase your risk of developing a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. However, drinking small amounts of alcohol should not be a problem for most people taking the medication. Before taking metformin, be sure to talk to your healthcare provider about drinking alcohol while taking the drug. An Overview of Metformin and Alcohol Metformin (Glucophage®) is a prescription medication licensed as a type 2 diabetes treatment. Often, people are warned to avoid alcohol entirely while taking metformin. This may (or may not) be good advice, depending on your particular situation. Metformin, Alcohol, and Lactic Acidosis Taking metformin increases your chance of developing a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis (see Metformin and Lactic Acidosis). Drinking large amounts of alcohol also increases your risk for lactic acidosis, and combining metformin and large amounts of alcohol can be dangerous (due to the risk of lactic acidosis). As a result, drinking large amounts of alcohol (either on a daily basis or as "binge drinking") is not recommended while taking metformin. Small amounts of alcohol should not be a problem for most people taking metformin. However, because other medical conditions may also increase your risk of lactic acidosis (including kidney or liver problems), there may be some situations where avoiding alcohol entirely might be a good idea. Metformin and Alcohol: Suggestions It is usually not necessary to completely avoid alcohol while taking metformin. However, drinking large amounts of alcohol while taking metformin is not recommended. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider if it would be okay to drink Continue reading >>

Real World Advice, Metformin And Beer.. And

Real World Advice, Metformin And Beer.. And

Real world advice, Metformin and Beer.. And I have a host of issues im dealing with right now. I just started taking meds , Metformin 500MG a day and accupril. At this time in not ready to quit my drinking. I know i must but im trying to cope as hard as i can. I was drinking a LOT in the past 4 years and have been an every day drinker since i was 18.. Im now 35. I know i must stop. Im also sure i became T2 because of it. After i was told i was T2 in 2005 i tired the diet and execise thing but i lost track in a bad way. So i have not drank in 7 days, this was the hard, i have a spinal injury that keeps me in constant pain. Long crazy story short for now, I just cracked a light beer, i plan to drink 4 tall boy light beers. What sort of drama can i expect with the meds im on? Please be kind with me, im trying real hard and its not easy. I fully know all about the fact im out of control with beer. I would just like to know the facts from people who have drank on these meds. Thank you, and thank you all for understanding this delicate time for me. I'm a T 2 on metformin ( 850 2 x a day). I drink a glass of wine 3 or 4 times a week. I find that it keeps my bg more in the normal range than without it. They tell you make sure you eat a carb with the alcohol. 500mg of met once a day, unless you have kidney issues you won't have much problem with alcohol itself. The carbs in the beer I can't help you with because they wont do the same thing for you as they do for me so you'll have to test and find out. THe alcohol warning for metformin is due to the possibility of lactic acidosis which has a high fatality rate. However, the reason that happens is alcohol and metformin are processed the same way and your body can't do both at the same time at the same rate so you will have the ef Continue reading >>

Pcos And Alcohol: Health Risks & Safe Drinking Tips

Pcos And Alcohol: Health Risks & Safe Drinking Tips

It’s Friday night and your friends are insisting you join them at the club for Ladies Night Out. You haven’t agreed yet ‘coz you’re just not sure about the connection between PCOS and alcohol. You’ve been diligent with your PCOS diet and are concerned whether a drink (or two!) will set you back. And you simply don’t want to sit there with your friending holding a club soda with lemon slices….where’s the fun in that? We get it. All those talks of lifestyle and diet modifications to reverse PCOS talk about eliminating alcohol from your diet. But is it really all that dangerous? Do you need to give up alcohol and become a teetotaler for life with PCOS? Let’s find some of those answers! 10 Reasons Why PCOS And Alcohol Don’t Mix Well The first thing to understand is how alcohol affects the body, especially of women with PCOS. Additionally, women process alcohol much slower as compared to men. This means that alcohol has a greater physical impact on women, which makes things a bit trickier. Here’s a look at 10 reasons why women with PCOS should be careful of alcohol intake. 1. Leads To Sugar Overload Cocktails are sugar bombs. Once you mix alcohol with a sugary mixer, the result is a beverage that is high in sugars and carbs. Wine, beer, and distilled alcohols are also high in calories. Sugars from grapes or the carbs from grain can cause a spike in blood sugar levels when had in excess. And they will only add to your PCOS weight gain woes. 2. Messes Around With Insulin Alcohol consumption, especially in excess, can reduce insulin sensitivity. Also, alcohol increases the secretion of glucagon and other hormones that raise glucose levels. This can further cause insulin levels to fluctuate. 3. Affects Your Fertility Research has found that heavy alcohol co Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

Is It Safe To Mix Metformin And Alcohol?

If you’re taking metformin to treat your diabetes, you may be wondering how this drug affects your ability to drink safely. Drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes symptoms directly, but there are additional risks if you drink alcohol with metformin. This article gives you information on how alcohol interacts with metformin and also how drinking alcohol can affect your diabetes. With any medicine you take, you should be aware of interactions that can happen if you use other substances. Metformin and alcohol can interact to increase your risk of harmful effects. You are at much greater risk of these effects if you frequently drink a lot of alcohol or you binge drink (drink a lot in short periods). These effects include an extremely low blood sugar level, called hypoglycemia, and a condition called lactic acidosis. Hypoglycemia Drinking alcohol while you’re taking metformin may cause extremely low blood sugar levels. Some symptoms of low blood sugar levels can be similar to symptoms of having too much alcohol. These include: drowsiness dizziness confusion Tell the people who are with you while you drink that you have diabetes. They can help you watch for these symptoms. If you or the people around you notice these symptoms, stop drinking and eat something right away to help increase your blood sugar level. If your symptoms of hypoglycemia are severe, such as losing consciousness, and you do not have a glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit, someone with you should call 9-1-1. A glucagon hypoglycemia rescue kit includes human glucagon (a natural substance that helps balance your blood sugar level), a syringe to inject it, and instructions. You can use this kit for severe hypoglycemia when eating food will not help. If you are not familiar with this kit, talk to your doctor Continue reading >>

What Happens If You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin

What Happens If You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin

What is Metformin? It is an oral diabetes drug that is used to control blood glucose levels. Metformin can be used alone or in combination with other medications to treat people with type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes refers to a chronic condition where the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin or use it properly. Insulin is a natural hormone which transports glucose from the blood stream to the body tissue to be stored or used for energy. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the body’s cells and stays in the bloodstream. Too much glucose in the bloodstream can lead to serious health complications. People with type 2 diabetes can take this medicine to help them reduce their blood sugar levels. However, this medication should not be used to treat type 1 diabetes, a condition where the body produces little or no insulin at all. This is because the drug works by helping the body respond properly to the insulin it already makes. In addition, it reduces the amount of glucose produced by the liver and decreases the amount of glucose absorbed by the intestines. This helps to control high blood glucose levels. How to take this medication The dosage of metformin will vary depending on the patient’s medical condition and response to treatment. To reduce the risk of side effects such as stomach upset, your doctor may advise you to start on a lower dose then increase it gradually. Make sure you take this medication exactly as it is prescribed by your doctor. This medication is supposed to be taken by mouth, normally one to three times per day together with meals. Use this medication every day so that you can get the most benefit out of it. Your doctor may need to change your dose occasionally so that you can get the best results. Remember to use this drug at the same time every Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Metformin | Alcohol With Metformin Side Effects

Alcohol And Metformin | Alcohol With Metformin Side Effects

What are the possible interactions of alcohol and metformin? What should you know about alcohol with metformin side effects? These are common questions people about metformin, which is a diabetic drug. Below what should be known about alcohol and metformin will be covered, including the possible alcohol with metformin side effects. Metformin is a drug that’s used to treat type 2 diabetes, and it can be used alone or with other medicines, and in adults and children. For people who are at risk of developing diabetes it can also be used as a way to prevent that, and it can be used as a treatment option for polycystic ovaries and weight gain due to the use of certain medicines. Metformin helps control high blood sugar levels, and this can in turn help prevent serious complications like kidney damage, nerve problems, and blindness. When your diabetes is well-controlled, it can also help lower the risk of a stroke or heart attack. The way metformin works is by restoring the way your body responds to the insulin you produce, and it decreases the amount of sugar made by your liver, and thereby absorbed by your stomach and intestines. Side effects of metformin can include nausea, vomiting, general upset stomach, diarrhea, weakness or a metallic taste in your mouth. In some cases, if metformin is taken with other diabetic medications, it can cause low blood sugar, but this isn’t usually a symptom of this medicine on its own. Understanding drug interactions is important with any medicine you’re prescribed, which is why you should tell your doctor about all other medicines you’re taking, your medical history, and even supplements and vitamins you take. Some of the medicines that can interact with metformin include beta-blockers and any medicine that affects your blood sugar Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Wine If I Take Metformin?

Can I Drink Wine If I Take Metformin?

You should not drink wine or any other alcoholic beverage while you're taking metformin (Glucophage, Fortamet), a prescription medication used to control blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Alcohol lowers blood sugar and, while you're taking metformin, may increase your risk of a buildup of lactic acid. This buildup of lactic acid, known as lactic acidosis, can start slowly and get worse over time. In some cases, it can even cause death. Continue reading >>

Slideshow: Diabetes-friendly Drinks And Cocktails

Slideshow: Diabetes-friendly Drinks And Cocktails

Drink in Moderation Most people with diabetes can enjoy some alcohol. Rules are the same as for everyone else: one drink per day for women; two for men. But you need to know how alcohol affects your blood sugar. A sugary drink might spike your blood sugar. But if you drink on an empty stomach or take certain meds, your levels could swing too low. A 12-ounce beer has about 15 grams of carbohydrates, compared to 3 to 6 grams in light beer. Also, “light” and “low carb” are pretty much the same thing -- and also your best bet. Be careful with craft beers. Most have twice the alcohol and calories as regular beer. Some research says wine (red or white) may help your body use insulin better and may even make you less likely to get type 2 diabetes in the first place. It may also have heart benefits, to boot! Moderation is the key as too much alcohol can cause hypoglycemia. A standard 5-ounce serving has about 120 calories, nearly all of which come from alcohol, not carbs. Recipes vary, but depending on the fruit and juices involved, this drink may have as much sugar as a regular soda. Instead of sangria, go with one glass of dry red or white wine. Those only have about 4 grams of carbs. Avoid sweeter varieties, like flavored wines and dessert wines. One ounce of liquor, depending on the proof, has about the same amount of alcohol as 5 ounces of wine. While liquor is often carb-free, mixers like soda and juice can send blood sugar levels through the roof. To prevent a spike, mix your liquor with a calorie-free drink like water or seltzer. Sweet drinks like margaritas and mojitos don’t have to be off-limits. Use sugar-free mixers for margaritas and fresh fruit for daiquiris. And instead of pouring simple syrup into mojitos and martinis, try a natural sweetener like stev Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Can You Drink Alcohol While Taking Metformin?

Metformin is a medication that helps manage type 2 diabetes and occasionally prediabetes. In general, drinking alcohol while taking metformin is not helpful and not recommended by doctors. The side effects of metformin can be life-threatening with excessive alcohol consumption. Metformin and alcohol both put stress on the liver, so intensifying the harmful effects and increasing the risk of liver complications. How does metformin and alcohol affect the body? Metformin is a popular, effective, and inexpensive management medication, prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In 2014, some 14.4 million people in the United States were prescribed metformin. Metformin is also being used more and more frequently in prediabetes cases. Metformin use in overweight people with type 1 diabetes may also reduce insulin requirements and increase metabolic control. The drug works by improving insulin sensitivity, promoting the uptake of glucose into tissues and lowering sugar levels in the bloodstream. By increasing how effectively the existing glucose is used, metformin reduces the amount of glucose the liver produces and the intestines absorb. Alcohol also affects blood sugars significantly. Alcohol digestion puts stress on the liver, an organ dedicated to the removal of poisons from the body. When the liver is forced to process high amounts of alcohol, it becomes overworked and releases less glucose. Long-term alcohol use can also make cells less sensitive to insulin. This means that less glucose is absorbed from the blood and levels in the bloodstream increase. Over time, alcohol consumption damages the liver, especially when it is consumed in excess. It reduces the liver's ability to produce and regulate glucose. Conditions like alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis of the live Continue reading >>

Alcohol And Metformin...

Alcohol And Metformin...

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Yes, I know you're not supposed to drink while on Metformin, but I know somebody out there must have had a whiskey or two while taking it. My question is this: Did you skip your dose if you knew you were going out for a drink? And either way, did you notice any ill-effects from your intake? Please share as many details as you can (unless that violates a court order). I'm not looking for anyone to justify anything. I'm going out for a drink this weekend and was just looking for anecdotal advice. Anything you're comfortable sharing would be great. Thanks! Yes, I know you're not supposed to drink while on Metformin, but I know somebody out there must have had a whiskey or two while taking it. My question is this: Did you skip your dose if you knew you were going out for a drink? And either way, did you notice any ill-effects from your intake? Please share as many details as you can (unless that violates a court order). I'm not looking for anyone to justify anything. I'm going out for a drink this weekend and was just looking for anecdotal advice. Anything you're comfortable sharing would be great. Thanks! I had no idea that you weren't supposed to drink while taking Metformin. I took it for about 9 months (that's as long as I could take the side effects, which just about did me in) and drank wine and vodka drinks (made with diet mixer) about a handful of times per month. I suffered no ill effects (other than a bit of a headache from the wine, LOL). Maybe I just got lucky, though. It will be interesting to hear from others about this. Continue reading >>

Drinking Wine On Metformin

Drinking Wine On Metformin

If this is your first visit, be sure tocheck out the FAQ by clicking thelink above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages,select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below. This is my first time on this blog. I was just diagnosed with PCOS and have been taking clomid for 5 rounds now. The Dr. has prescribed clomid and metformin to take this month. My sweat husband just returned with the bottle and it says no alcohol whilst taking the drug does this mean no wine? I realize I will have to give it up when I get pregnant but just wanted to get another opinion. how sweet your hubby bought you some wine. i personally dont drink alcohol with met, as it seems to go to my head quicker! I dont know about clomid, though. Sorry. But im sure someone will be able to help PCOS, LOCAH, ER+ breast cancer, Endom, Lichen Planus, IBS, HS, raised bp/ cholesterol. Meds: Spiro, Bendrofluazide, Amlodopine, Simvastatin, Met, Prednisolone, Mebeverine, Omeprazole, Tamoxafen , Me - 45, hubby 39 son 15 Married 18 years She is buffeted by the wind, but she does not sink. I can drink ONE unit, that's it.. just ONE. So that's a small glass of red wine or a beer. I seldom drink after the... incident.. When I was first on Met i went out with my dad and two large glasses of wine later I was convinced I was going to puke my guts up into the toilet bowl.. not fun. I decided from then to go tee-total and I did for a good couple of years. I've started drinking one unit every so often though just because I find myself craving red wine (which is wierd, maybe it's hormonal lol) Just be careful, met seems to increase your sensitivity to a lot of things including wine so you'll likely go from sober to puking with no warnin Continue reading >>

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