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Can You Die From Diabetes Type 2

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

The Dead In Bed Syndrome

The Dead In Bed Syndrome

Someone with type 1 diabetes is found dead in the morning in an undisturbed bed after having been observed in apparently good health the day before. No cause of death can be established. This is the typical situation of the "dead in bed" syndrome, a very tragic outcome which leaves the family with many unanswered questions: Why, when, how, could it have been avoided? After the first report from UK1 the observations have been confirmed from other countries.2,3 A number of young people with type 1 diabetes have been found dead in the morning without previous symptoms of illness, hyper- or hypoglycemia. The number of deaths of this kind per 10,000 patient years has been estimated to 2-6.4 For a population of 100,000 persons with diabetes, this represents 20-60 deaths per year or approximately 6% of all deaths in persons with diabetes aged less than 40 years.4 A relationship to human insulin1 or intensive insulin treatment2 has been postulated but does not seem likely.4 Autopsies have not revealed the cause of death. The diagnosis of hypoglycemia is difficult to confirm after death.5 There is however one case report where the person who died was wearing a retrospective (non-real-time) sensor, and the sensor reading demonstrated levels below 30 mg/dl (1.7 mmol/l) around the time of death (restrictions on reading glucose levels <40 mg/dl, 2.2 mmol/l, were removed by sensor manufacturer after the event), with at least 3 hours of severe hypoglycemia below <40 mg/dl, 2.2 mmol/l, before death.6 Another report using sensor tracings has shown a lag time of 2-4 hours before the onset of seizures when having severe hypoglycemia.7 In a recent review, clinical reports strongly suggest that nighttime hypoglycemia is a likely prerequisite of the event, but that the death is sudden and pr Continue reading >>

How Australians Die: Cause #5 – Diabetes

How Australians Die: Cause #5 – Diabetes

This is the final in the How Australians Die series that focuses on the country’s top five causes of death and how we can drive down rates of these illnesses. Previous series articles were on heart diseases and stroke, cancers, dementia and chronic lower respiratory diseases. Diabetes is rapidly emerging as a leading cause of death among Australians. It is also a leading cause of heart attacks, strokes, amputations, kidney failure, depression, dementia and severe infections – all of which themselves contribute to premature death. It never used to be this way. Thirty years ago, around 250,000 Australians had diabetes. Today that figure is around two million. Around the world in 2013, more than five million people between the ages of 20 and 79 died from diabetes, accounting for 8.4% of deaths among people in this age group. This translates to one death due to diabetes every six seconds. Tragically, nearly half of these were in people under 60. These figures likely underestimate the major role of diabetes in death as it frequently goes unreported as a cause of death. One study showed that only 35% to 40% of people with diabetes who died had the disease listed on their death certificate, while only about 10% to 15% had diabetes listed as the underlying cause of death. Which type of diabetes is worst? Diabetes is characterised by higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood, caused by having insufficient insulin production or function to keep glucose levels under control. This can come about if the immune system inadvertently destroys the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. This is called type 1 diabetes. It can occur at any age, but is most common in children and young adults. Ectopic fat – fat that accumulates outside the typical stores underneath your skin Continue reading >>

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

How Do People Die From Diabetes?

Diabetes is amongst the foremost leading cause of deaths in most of the countries. Today, the disease is widespread like an epidemic and the several complications which diabetes leads to often make people wonder #Can you Die from Diabetes?”. Well, although the answer to the above question cannot be a straight “Yes”, there is no denying of the fact that diabetes can, in fact, turn out to be a deadly disease. As per a report circulated by Diabetes UK, the life expectancy of a type 1 diabetes patient can be reduced by 20 years, while the same can be reduced by 10 in the case of a type 1 diabetes patient. This, of course, can be controlled by adopting a healthy lifestyle and controlling your blood sugar levels. Some of the ways in which you can die from diabetes include the following: High Blood Glucose Levels: The leading cause of death in diabetic patients is the inability to keep the blood glucose levels under control. Lipid Disorders: With diabetes comes a host of various other complications such as heart diseases, kidney disorders, amongst others. The leading cause of these complications is the disorder of the lipids in a diabetic patient. Diabetes Ketoacidosis: The high sugar level in the blood which is a characteristic of diabetes often leads to the high amount of ketone cells in the body. These ketones could be extremely deadly, causing deaths in patients. Complications: Diabetes is known to cause several complications in patients which adversely affect the functioning of the heart, kidney, eyes, and even nerves of different body parts. Any of these complications can become serious and lead to the death of the patient. Hence, can you die from diabetes? Well, yes you can. However, with proper care, regular exercise, following a proper diet, and taking timely me Continue reading >>

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

My Sister Died Because She Didn't Take Diabetes Seriously

When Yolanda Acuna Ocana was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, her family was almost relieved. She was 14 and had been suffering from inexplicable weight loss, constant thirst and tiredness, and they were grateful for a diagnosis. Now — sadly — they feel very differently about diabetes. Last April, aged just 39, Yolanda died as a result of the disease, leaving behind a loving husband and devoted family. ‘No one expects diabetes to kill someone so young in this day and age,’ says Yolanda’s sister, Nicky Dixon, 38, a company director from Surbiton, Surrey. People often think diabetes, type 1 or type 2, is not a serious condition, says Dr Jeremy Allgrove, a paediatric endocrinologist at Barts and the London NHS Trust. ‘But if you don’t look after yourself, it’s a killer.’ The figures are stark: type 1 diabetes reduces life expectancy on average by 20 years. The condition is caused by the body attacking the cells of the pancreas responsible for making insulin. Insulin helps the body break down glucose from food and turn it into energy; without it, blood sugar levels become dangerously high, causing damage to blood vessels. Around 300,000 Britons have the condition. It can run in families, but experts believe the condition is usually triggered, possibly by some sort of virus. Unlike type 2 diabetes, type 1 is characterised by insulin dependence — once diagnosed, a patient must inject themselves daily for the rest of their life. The problem is that many people don’t take their insulin as they should, with potentially fatal consequences. Yolanda was supposed to inject herself seven times a day, but when she left home for university at 18, she reduced her intake because the jabs were causing her to put on weight. This growing trend has even been given a name Continue reading >>

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes - A Major Risk Factor For Kidney Disease

Diabetes mellitus, usually called diabetes, is a disease in which your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use normal amounts of insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that regulates the amount of sugar in your blood. A high blood sugar level can cause problems in many parts of your body. The most common ones are Type 1 and Type 2. Type 1 diabetes usually occurs in children. It is also called juvenile onset diabetes mellitus or insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In this type, your pancreas does not make enough insulin and you have to take insulin injections for the rest of your life. Type 2 diabetes, which is more common, usually occurs in people over 40 and is called adult onset diabetes mellitus. It is also called non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. In Type 2, your pancreas makes insulin, but your body does not use it properly. The high blood sugar level often can be controlled by following a diet and/or taking medication, although some patients must take insulin. Type 2 diabetes is particularly prevalent among African Americans, American Indians, Latin Americans and Asian Americans. With diabetes, the small blood vessels in the body are injured. When the blood vessels in the kidneys are injured, your kidneys cannot clean your blood properly. Your body will retain more water and salt than it should, which can result in weight gain and ankle swelling. You may have protein in your urine. Also, waste materials will build up in your blood. Diabetes also may cause damage to nerves in your body. This can cause difficulty in emptying your bladder. The pressure resulting from your full bladder can back up and injure the kidneys. Also, if urine remains in your bladder for a long time, you can develop an infection from the rapid growth of bacteria in urine that h Continue reading >>

Dead-in-bed Syndrome

Dead-in-bed Syndrome

The syndrome of sudden unexpected death or "dead in bed" syndrome is considered to account for around 5% of deaths in type 1 diabetes, a rate equivalent to 2-6 cases per 10,000 patient-years. The condition may be 10 times more common in type 1 diabetes than in the rest of the population, and males are more commonly affected. Typically, the patient is found lying in an undisturbed bed, with no obvious antecedents or abnormal post-mortem findings. The proximate cause of death is likely to be a cardiac dysrhythmia, possibly triggered by hypoglycaemia against a background of autonomic dysfunction. Background The syndrome first came to attention against the background of concerns about the possible risks of human insulin. This was at one time considered to be a cause of loss of hypoglycaemia awareness, and a pathologist in the UK linked this to a number of cases which occurred at around the time when many were converted from animal source to biosynthetic insulin - see Porcine insulin. The syndrome occurs in insulin-treated patients, but is no longer considered to be linked to any specific formulation. Tattersall and Gill published the first report on the condition in 1991. This described 22 apparently healthy people with type 1 diabetes aged 12-43 years who died in their sleep with no evidence of a struggle, and suggested nocturnal hypoglycaemia as the cause[1]. Further experience Subsequent reports identified around 100 further similar deaths. Thus, although rare, the syndrome accounts for an important minority - some 5-10%[2] - of all deaths in type 1 diabetes. One challenge has been to estimate the frequency of this phenomenon in the non-diabetic population. The syndrome has some similarity to the sudden-infant death syndrome (SIDS), but no common factors have been identi Continue reading >>

Brittany Murphy, Type 2 Diabetes, And Cardiac Arrest: Speculation And Science

Brittany Murphy, Type 2 Diabetes, And Cardiac Arrest: Speculation And Science

What made Brittany Murphy’s heart stop beating? We’re not likely to know why the actress went into cardiac arrest until toxicology reports come out sometime in the next six weeks. One clue, however, is that according to her mother, she had type 2 diabetes. If that’s the case, her tragic death may have some simple medical answers. Gossip Web sites have been quick to point out that Murphy was plagued by rumors of drug abuse and anorexia, both of which can put a strain on the cardiovascular system. But type 2 diabetes can be even harder on the heart. The high glucose levels associated with the disease affect the arteries, making the vessel walls rough and more likely to collect fatty deposits that block the flow of blood. If blood flow to the heart is interrupted, the cardiac muscle becomes starved for oxygen and dies. Even when they’re being treated effectively, people with type 2 diabetes are at a much higher risk for a heart attack or stroke than most of us. Having the disease is as big a risk factor as having already had one heart attack. When diabetes patients do have heart attacks, they’re about twice as likely to die of them. Sixty-five percent of diabetes patients ultimately die of cardiovascular disease or related complications. At 32, Murphy was young to go into cardiac arrest, but even children with diabetes can have heart trouble. It's impossible for us to know, without examining her, what lead to the cause of death. But someone in Murphy's situation may have had other risk factors for a heart attack─regardless of any rumors about anorexia and drug use. At the time of her death, she was reportedly “taking prescription meds for flu-like symptoms she had been experiencing for several days.” Catching the flu can make a person more susceptible to he Continue reading >>

Can You Die From Diabetes?

Can You Die From Diabetes?

Diabetes mellitus or simply diabetes is a metabolic disease that has an impact on how your body regulates blood glucose levels. Glucose or blood sugar levels (BSL) are kept in check by the hormone insulin, which increases the uptake and utilization of glucose by cells in order to produce energy. In two major types of diabetes, BSL rises because the body either stops producing insulin completely/sufficient quantity (type 1), or stops responding to insulin due to reduced sensitivity or quantity (type 2). As a result of increased BSL and reduced insulin, a number of systems and functions of the body are affected resulting in long-term complications. But the million dollar question is can you die from diabetes? Can Anybody Die from Diabetes? Well, diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and has left breast cancer and AIDS far behind. While most people don’t take diabetes seriously, it must be kept in mind that diabetes doubles the chance of having a heart attack and places one at an increased risk of stroke, circulation problems, heart disease, nerve damage, foot ulcers, blindness and kidney damage. Life-Threatening Complications of Diabetes So can you die from diabetes? Yes, they may. If not managed properly and in time, diabetes may lead to may complications, increasing the chances of death. 1. Hypoglycemia Fluctuating blood sugar levels and resulting symptoms are often what diabetics present with. Diabetic people on insulin may complain of extremely low BSL and this state is known as hypoglycemia, which produces the following symptoms: Palpitations Shakiness Pale skin Sweating Fatigue Anxiety Hunger Irritability Tingling sensation around the mouth Crying episodes during sleep Ignoring these symptoms may have serious consequences as the following complications ma Continue reading >>

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

Type 2 Myths And Misconceptions

While close to 10 percent of Americans have diabetes, there’s a lot of misinformation about the disease. This is especially the case for type 2 diabetes, the most common form of diabetes. Here are nine myths about type 2 diabetes — and the facts that debunk them. 1. Diabetes isn’t a serious disease. Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease. In fact, two out of three people with diabetes will die from cardiovascular-related episodes, such as a heart attack or stroke. However, diabetes can be controlled with proper medications and lifestyle changes. 2. If you’re overweight, you’ll automatically get type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese is a serious risk factor, but there are other factors that put you at an increased risk. Having a family history of diabetes, having high blood pressure, or being sedentary are just some of these other factors. 3. Exercising when you have diabetes only increases your chances of experiencing low blood sugar. Don’t think that just because you have diabetes you can skip out on your workout! Exercise is crucial to controlling diabetes. If you’re on insulin, or a medication that increases insulin production in the body, you have to balance exercise with your medication and diet. Talk to your doctor about creating an exercise program that’s right for you and your body. 4. Insulin will harm you. Insulin is a lifesaver, but it’s also difficult to manage for some people. New and improved insulin allows for much tighter blood sugar control with lower risk of low or high blood sugar. Testing your blood sugar levels, however, is the only way to know how your treatment plan is working for you. 5. Having diabetes means your body isn’t producing enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes typically have enough insulin when they’re Continue reading >>

Why Are So Many Kids Dying From Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes?

Why Are So Many Kids Dying From Undiagnosed Type 1 Diabetes?

An Open Letter To The Non-Diabetes Medical Community At Large and All Parents With Kids of Every Age, Everywhere! Dear pediatricians, nurses, medical staff, medical office personnel, hospitals, hospital staff, school nurses, physicians, ER medical staff, urgent care facilities, and any other medical office/facility that treats sick kids: I have a question for you. Why are so many kids dying from undiagnosed Type 1 diabetes? Why are they not being tested for Type 1 diabetes when their parents bring them to you when they’re sick? I know that sometimes, Type 1 symptoms can be similar to the flu or a stomach bug, so as a matter of caution, why can’t a 5 second finger stick be done as a matter of protocol just to try to potentially rule out the chance that it could be Type 1 diabetes instead of the flu? Why? Yes, I know, I know. You’re extremely busy, understaffed, and buried in mountains of paperwork at your medical offices. I get it. You’re working twice as hard for half as much, (or less- I’m a woman, so I get that too, but I digress) and you have to carry outrageously expensive liability insurance, etc. Yes, I get that too, loud and clear. Welcome to the club. We are busy too and many of us experience similar situations in our businesses as well. But, that is a lousy excuse for not trying to rule out Type 1 diabetes in your little patients who are counting on you to help them when they are sick. It was you who chose a profession that is designed to take care of sick people. So, take care of sick people. I’m Trying To Figure This Out Countless healthcare professionals have told me that their patients (or parents of patients) are much more informed and that these patients often come into the office with health information printed from online resources. So, are Continue reading >>

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet, exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; with type 2 diabetes, your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally.) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. More than 4 million people with diabetes have some degree of retinopathy, or dam Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes More Likely To Die

Breast cancer patients are nearly 50 percent more likely to die of any cause if they also have diabetes, according to a comprehensive review of research conducted by Johns Hopkins physicians. The findings, published in the January issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, suggest future research could focus on whether high levels of insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes could play a role in promoting tumor growth. The researchers who conducted the review also found that diabetics tend to be diagnosed with later-stage breast cancers and to receive altered and potentially less effective treatment regimens. "When patients are faced with a diagnosis of breast cancer, which they see as an imminent threat to their lives, diabetes care often goes on the back burner," says study leader Kimberly S. Peairs, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. "This research suggests we may need to proactively treat the diabetes as well as the cancer," she adds, noting that diabetes is a systemic disease that has many different effects on the body. Peairs and her team conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of previously published research on breast cancer and diabetes, ultimately looking in depth at eight studies. In six of seven studies of breast cancer patients, preexisting diabetes was associated with significantly higher long-term all-cause mortality. Diabetes and cancer are major causes of illness and death worldwide. In 2007, in the United States alone, roughly 24 million people had diabetes (about 8 percent of the population) and 2.5 million were survivors of breast cancer. Diabetics are known to have a higher risk of breast cancer, Peairs says. Peairs says her research suggests that diabetics diagnosed with breast cancer Continue reading >>

7 Symptoms To Never Ignore If You Have Diabetes

7 Symptoms To Never Ignore If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes watch for these warning signs that something is amiss – and make sure you know how to respond #1. Blurry vision. Vision changes may mean your blood sugar is high, says endocrinologist Alan L. Rubin, MD, author of Diabetes for Dummies, Type 1 Diabetes for Dummies and other health books in the “Dummies” series. “High blood sugar draws more fluid into the lens of the eye, so your vision is less sharp,” he explains. “The first thing to do is to check your blood sugar more frequently and bring it under better control.” Temporary blurriness may also occur when starting insulin. What to do: If problems persist despite good glucose numbers, tell your doctor. Eyesight changes may be caused by an easy-to-fix problem like dry eyes, be a side effect of some medications or even computer eye strain. But it can also be a warning sign of diabetic retinopathy – when tiny blood vessels at the back of the eye swell and leak. It could also be a sign of other vision issues like glaucoma or age-related macular degeneration. All can be treated to prevent further problems. #2. Unusual thirst and feeling extra-tired. High blood sugar is usually the culprit, according to the American Diabetes Association. But don’t shrug it off —letting your numbers drift beyond the healthy range sets you up for complications and could be a sign of a serious condition that needs immediate medical attention. What to do: Check your glucose level now and recheck frequently; make sure you’re following your eating and exercise plan and taking your medication as directed. If you’ve been sick, follow your sick-day plan; illness can make blood sugar rise. Extremely high blood sugar – over 600 mg/dL – can lead to seizures, coma and even death, the ADA warns. This condition Continue reading >>

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

Top 10 Tips For People Newly Diagnosed With Type 2 Diabetes

twitter summary: Ten tips for newly diagnosed T2 #diabetes: act NOW for long-term benefits, use healthy eating, exercise, meds + structured blood glucose testing short summary: This article offers ten tips for people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes: 1) Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing; 2) Start to take care of your diabetes as soon as you’re diagnosed (and even better, before, if you know you have prediabetes); 3) Recognize that type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease; 4) Keep in mind that food has a major impact on blood glucose; work to optimize your mealtime choices; 5) Exercise is a powerful and underutilized tool which can increase insulin sensitivity and improve health – use it as much as possible; 6) Use blood glucose testing to identify patterns; 7) Don’t forget that needing to take insulin doesn’t mean you failed; 8) Keep learning and find support; 9) Seek out the services of a Diabetes Educator; and 10) Review our Patient's Guide to Individualizing Therapy at www.diaTribe.org/patientguide. Know that developing type 2 diabetes does not represent a personal failing. It develops through a combination of factors that are still being uncovered and better understood. Lifestyle (food, exercise, stress, sleep) certainly plays a major role, but genetics play a significant role as well. Type 2 diabetes is often described in the media as a result of being overweight, but the relationship is not that simple. Many overweight individuals never get type 2, and some people with type 2 were never overweight. At its core, type 2 involves two physiological issues: resistance to the insulin made by the person’s beta cells and too little insulin production relative to the amount one needs. These problems can lead to high bl Continue reading >>

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