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Can You Diagnose Diabetes With Finger Prick Test?

Smart Sensor That Ends Diabetes Finger Prick Tests

Smart Sensor That Ends Diabetes Finger Prick Tests

Yet since he was 18 months old, Joe has had to live with Type 1 diabetes and at least four times a day has to inject himself with insulin into his thigh or tummy to keep his blood sugar steady. However for Joe, who lives in Amersham, Bucks, with his parents Sally, 42, Glenn, 43 and younger sister Hali, five, the worst aspect of having diabetes is having to endure regular finger prick tests, including during the night, to monitor his blood sugar levels. Regular blood glucose testing is one of the most challenging aspects of managing diabetes in children and young people After more than seven years of regular tests, his fingertips have become hard and sore. As he grows up he has become more aware that his friends don't have to endure being a human pincushion. Sally says sometimes Joe will refuse food because he knows he will have to have his finger pricked before eating. Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong condition caused by lack of insulin. This results in too much sugar in the blood. Over time it can lead to many long-term health problems including blindness, kidney failure, lower limb amputation, heart disease as well as stroke. With Type 1 diabetes, which normally begins in childhood or adolescence, the pancreas stops making insulin, the hormone which controls blood sugar levels. Insulin, administered either through regular injections or a pump, is the only way that the UK's 400,000 Type 1 diabetics can manage the condition. If enough insulin is not injected, blood sugar remains too high. Too much and it falls too low, raising the risk of a hypoglycemic attack. Also known as hypos, these episodes can cause loss of consciousness, seizures and even death. 16 of the best superfoods Thu, August 18, 2016 Here are 16 of the best superfoods foods that fight disease and promote go Continue reading >>

Finger-prick Testing ‘not Necessary’ For Many Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Finger-prick Testing ‘not Necessary’ For Many Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Self-monitoring of blood glucose levels by patients with type 2 diabetes who are not on insulin does not improve glycemic control or quality of life, according to a US trial. Continue reading >>

Overcoming Fear Of The Finger-prick

Overcoming Fear Of The Finger-prick

About one million South Africans have diabetes, but some will only find out when they’re admitted to hospital with a stroke, heart attack or gangrenous foot. These tragic complications of uncontrolled diabetes could be avoided with a simple finger-prick test. Understanding what diabetes is Diabetes (short for diabetes mellitus) is a chronic medical condition in which your body is unable to produce or respond to the hormone insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas, which controls blood sugar (glucose) levels and allows the body to use blood sugar by entering into the little cells that need fuel or energy. When your blood sugar levels are high, your pancreas churns out insulin and when your sugar level is low it blocks production. Without insulin, glucose from your diet simply floats around in your bloodstream causing all sorts of problems while your cells starve from a lack of fuel. Understanding why you need to screen for diabetes Like so many medical conditions there is simply no way to know whether you have diabetes just by looking at yourself in the mirror. The average adult lives with pre-diabetes or diabetes for one to four years before ever being diagnosed. You could have diabetes right now. You might ask why there’s an urgency to screen for diabetes. It’s simply because abnormally high blood sugar (glucose) levels are not good for your body! The longer your diabetes goes undiagnosed and untreated, the longer rampant uncontrolled damage is taking place. If you’ve ever experimented with a tooth in a glass of Coca Cola you’ll know what sugar can do! Untreated diabetes will also lead to a whole range of unpleasant side effects like dizziness, tiredness, poor concentration and work performance as well as increased urination. The sooner you test, the soon Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which the pancreas is under an on-going attack by the immune system, interfering with the production of a hormone called insulin. Without insulin, glucose (sugar) accumulates in the blood and cannot be used to produce energy. Insulin is necessary for survival. With Type 1 diabetes, lifestyle, diet, or exercise changes will not make insulin available again. Instead, the missing insulin must be replaced. Children and adults with Type 1 diabetes have to monitor their blood glucose and inject or pump insulin into their bodies everyday for the rest of their lives to carefully regulate glucose levels. Too much insulin (hypoglycemia) or too little insulin (hyperglycemia) is dangerous. Balancing blood glucose levels and insulin dosages is a minute-by-minute job, even while sleeping. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that unlocks cells to allow the entry of glucose (sugar) for energy production. Excess insulin causes fat to be stored for later use as energy. A healthy pancreas is very sensitive to the amount of glucose in the bloodstream and speeds up or slows down insulin production, as needed, to maintain perfect balance. To keep people with Type 1 diabetes alive, synthetic insulins have been developed and are taken as multiple daily injections (MDI) or continuously via an insulin pump. Normal pancreatic function is so complex that it's not possible for someone with Type 1 diabetes to have perfect balance. The complexity of counting the carbohydrate, protein, and fat intake, combined with overall health, ​activity, stress, and glucose levels to determine insulin dosages creates a reality that is not only difficult, but life-threatening. It also causes a tremendous emotional and financial burden for both patient and ca Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

What is a blood sugar test? A blood sugar test is a procedure that measures the amount of sugar, or glucose, in your blood. Your doctor may order this test to help diagnose diabetes. And people with diabetes can use this test to manage their condition. Blood sugar tests provide instant results and let you know the following: your diet or exercise routine needs to change your diabetes medications or treatment is working your blood sugar levels are high or low your overall treatment goals for diabetes are manageable Your doctor may also order a blood sugar test as part of a routine checkup. Or to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes, a condition where your blood sugar levels are higher than normal. Your risk for diabetes increases if any of the following factors are true: you are 45 years old or older you are overweight you don’t exercise much you have high blood pressure, high triglycerides, or low good cholesterol levels (HDL) you have a history of gestational diabetes or giving birth to a baby who weighed over 9 pounds you have a history if insulin resistance you are Asian, African, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, or Native American you have a family history of diabetes Checking your blood sugar levels can be done at home or at a doctor’s office. Read on to learn more about blood sugar tests, who they are for, and what the results mean. Your doctor may order a blood sugar test to see if you have diabetes or prediabetes. The test will measure the amount of glucose in your blood. Your body takes carbohydrates found in foods like grains and fruits and converts them into glucose. Glucose, a sugar, is one of the body’s main sources of energy. For people with diabetes, a home test helps monitor blood sugar levels. Taking a blood sugar test can help determine your blood Continue reading >>

No More Finger Pricks For Some With Diabetes

No More Finger Pricks For Some With Diabetes

If you have type 2 diabetes, chances are you prick your finger once a day or so to check your blood sugar. But a growing body of evidence shows that for most type 2 diabetes patients, routinely tracking your blood sugar, or glucose, doesn’t make any difference for your health. The exception is patients taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug such as glipizide (which goes by the brand name Glucotrol) or glimepiride (Amaryl), which stimulates beta cells in the pancreas to produce insulin. That’s according to Dr. Jack Ende, president of the American College of Physicians, a professional organization of internal medicine specialists. Both insulin and the sulfonylureas can lead to hypoglycemia, or too-low blood sugar, so it’s important to perform self-monitoring, said Ende, an assistant dean at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine in Philadelphia. Good News for Many with Diabetes “If you’re diet-controlled alone, or you’re just on metformin (a widely prescribed diabetes medication), which does not cause hypoglycemia, and you’re not interested in testing, there’s really no reason to do it,” he said. “It’s expensive [test strips alone cost around $1 each]. It’s burdensome.” But, Ende said, he has some patients who, even though they’re controlling their blood sugar by diet alone, continue to prick their finger regularly to check their glucose. Some health-care providers think self-testing makes patients feel empowered, thus enhancing their motivation to maintain control of their blood sugar. — Dr. Laura Young, University of North Carolina School of Medicine “It helps them stay on the diet,” he explained. “It’s a motivating technique,” kind of like hopping on the scale every morning if you’re trying to lose weight Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Glucose Testing Of Little Value To Some Patients

Type 2 Diabetes: Blood Glucose Testing Of Little Value To Some Patients

Many patients with type 2 diabetes consider finger-prick blood tests key for keeping blood glucose levels under control. But according to a new study, they are unlikely to be beneficial for patients who are not receiving insulin therapy. Researchers found that self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) for 1 year failed to improve blood glucose control or health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with type 2 diabetes who were not treated with insulin. Senior study author Dr. Katrina Donahue, of the School of Medicine at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill, and colleagues believe that their findings raise questions about the value of SMBG for many patients with type 2 diabetes. "Of course, patients and providers have to consider each unique situation as they determine whether home blood glucose monitoring is appropriate," says Dr. Donahue. "But the study's null results suggest that self-monitoring of blood glucose in non-insulin treated type 2 diabetes has limited utility. For the majority, the costs may outweigh the benefits." The team's findings were recently reported in JAMA Internal Medicine. Type 2 diabetes and blood glucose control According to the American Diabetes Association, around 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, accounting for around 90 to 95 percent of all cases. In type 2 diabetes, the body is unable to effectively use insulin, which is a hormone that helps to regulate blood glucose levels. As a result, glucose accumulates in the blood. Left untreated, high blood glucose levels can lead to severe complications, including kidney disease, stroke, and nerve damage. While some patients with type 2 diabetes require insulin therapy, the majority of patients are able to manage their Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

7 Ways To Make Blood-sugar Testing Less Painful

No more sore fingers You need to prick your finger to obtain a drop of blood for home blood-glucose monitoring. Does it hurt? Some people say yes, but they've gotten used to it. Others say they find it virtually painless. Only you can decide. But here are 7 tried-and-true methods for making it less painful. Find out what works for you When Nancy Chiller Janow, age 54, was first diagnosed with type 2, her endocrinologist "punctured me so hard in the middle of the finger pad, that I never wanted to test again," she says. "It really hurt." Janow's internist recommended she experiment to find a more comfortable spot. "I did and finally found that testing on the side of the pad, close to the nail, is the most comfortable," she says. "I often use my thumb. Maybe because that's more callused, it's more comfortable and doesn't hurt when I stick it." Avoid pricking the finger’s tip This part of the finger is especially sensitive and can be more painful than other parts of your finger. Aim for the side of your finger. Fingertips are a poor choice because they tend to have more nerve endings, says Nadine Uplinger, director of the Gutman Diabetes Institute at Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in Philadelphia. "We teach people to monitor on the sides of their fingers, not down by the knuckle but up by the nail bed on the fleshy part and not on the tips," she says. "Another thing to do is pinch or put pressure on where you're going to test to seal it and that seems to minimize pain." Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring

Blood Glucose Monitoring

One of the main aims of diabetes treatment is to keep blood glucose levels within a specified target range. The key is balancing your food with your activity, lifestyle and diabetes medicines. Blood glucose monitoring can help you understand the link between blood glucose, food, exercise and insulin. Over time your readings will provide you and your health professionals with the information required to determine the best management strategy for your diabetes. Maintaining good blood glucose control is your best defence to reduce the chances of developing complications from diabetes. Self-blood glucose monitoring allows you to check your blood glucose levels as often as you need to or as recommended by your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. To test blood glucose levels, you need: A blood glucose meter A lancet device with lancets Test strips. Blood glucose meters are usually sold as kits giving you all the equipment you need to start. There are many different types, offering different features and at different prices to meet individual needs. Most of these are available from Diabetes Australia in your state or territory, pharmacies and some diabetes centres. Your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator can help you choose the meter that’s best for you, and your Credentialled Diabetes Educator or pharmacist can show you how to use your meter to get accurate results. To test your blood glucose levels, you prick your finger with the lancet and add a small drop of blood onto a testing strip. This strip is then inserted into the meter, which reads the strip and displays a number – your blood glucose level. When and how often you should test your blood glucose levels varies depending on each individual, the type of diabetes and the tablets and/or insulin being us Continue reading >>

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Home Test To Check If You Have Diabetes

Testing blood sugar at home can be an effective way to treat and monitor your diabetes. Diabetes is one of the top 10 causes of death in North America. About 29.1 million people in the U.S. have diabetes – 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. Suspecting that you or a loved one might have diabetes can be scary. It is a condition that causes sweeping changes to a person’s lifestyle. In most cases, because the early signs of diabetes are not known, being diagnosed comes as a shock. However, there are affordable tests that can be done at home to help diagnose diabetes in its early stages. But before you embark on home testing, it’s important to recognize the symptoms that can help you determine if home testing is necessary. Major symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: Excessive thirst Frequent urination Excessive hunger Fatigue Blurry vision Sores and cuts that won’t heal What are diabetic home tests? Although going in to see your doctor will give you accurate blood sugar readings, it can be a hassle making an appointment, waiting to see your doctor and traveling to and from the office. Instead you can do at home testing, which can help you better monitor and control your diabetes. There are different types of at-home tests you can complete daily to properly monitor your blood sugar levels. You can do a blood test, urine test or use an A1C kit. Those who would benefit from diabetic home testing are those with type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, prediabetes and individuals who are showing signs of diabetes. By keeping track of blood sugar levels you can gauge how your current treatment and lifestyle habits are affecting your condition. A normal blood sugar reading, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), is between 70 and 140 mg/dL. Low blood sug Continue reading >>

How Is Pre-diabetes Diagnosed?

How Is Pre-diabetes Diagnosed?

Two Important Tests for Diagnosing Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is metabolic condition that is diagnosed when a person has either Impaired Fasting Glucose (IFG), or Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT). There are two blood tests that are generally used to diagnose or confirm pre-diabetes. Both of these tests are usually done in the laboratory and involve drinking a sugary solution and having blood drawn from a vein. The two main tests used in diagnosing pre-diabetes are: These tests do not check insulin levels – they only check your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. It is possible to have normal blood glucose levels but abnormally high insulin levels (insulin resistance). To rule out insulin resistance you need to have your fasting insulin levels checked and tested whenever you have blood drawn from a vein to check glucose levels. If blood tests show that you have impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) your doctor may suggest changes in your diet and exercise, or prescribe medications to help reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. You can easily check your morning fasting blood sugars at home. You can purchase blood glucose meters over the counter without a prescription at any pharmacy or drug store. If your blood sugar is not normal, call your doctor right away for medical advice. Morning Fasting Glucose Test (Fasting Blood Sugar) A fasting blood sugar test can be done with a simple finger stick using a home blood glucose testing kit, or in your doctor’s office. Some doctors might send you to a lab to have blood drawn other work done at the same time. If your doctor only wants to know your blood sugar levels and you have to pay for your lab work, be sure to ask your doctor about doing a finger stick (just like a person with diabetes Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For Making Daily Glucose Tests Easier

Gestational Diabetes: Tips For Making Daily Glucose Tests Easier

I have gestational diabetes. Now what? If your doctor has diagnosed you with gestational diabetes, you've already undergone some tests to check your blood sugar (or glucose) levels. Having gestational diabetes means that your blood sugar levels are too high. Gestational diabetes (along with high blood pressure, or hypertension) is one of the most common illnesses during pregnancy. Although the thought of having gestational diabetes may scare you at first, in most cases it's easily treated. At first your doctor will probably try to have you control your diabetes with a special diet. You'll have to avoid certain types of food that can cause your blood glucose levels to rise too high. You'll also need to eat less of certain foods, keep track of the time between meals, and measure your blood sugar regularly. If you can't control your glucose levels with this regimen, your doctor may prescribe insulin, which can either be injected or taken as a pill. Checking your blood sugar If you need to check your blood sugar levels at home, you can do so with a home glucose testing kit. Several types are available, but all kits have a device for drawing blood, digital measuring device, and a test strip. To get a small blood sample, you prick the end of your finger with a lancet designed to penetrate the skin only as far as needed to draw a drop of blood. This can be uncomfortable for some people, especially those who have to do the test three to six times a day. After pricking your finger, you put a small amount of blood on the strip and place the strip into the measuring device. The meter displays the blood glucose level in about 30 seconds. In most cases, blood sugar levels have to be measured after each meal, but your doctor may tell you that you need to do the test before eating as Continue reading >>

How Does The A1c Test Work?

How Does The A1c Test Work?

An A1C (glucose) test is a blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past three months. The A1C test is sometimes called the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin test. The results of the A1C test can tell you how well you are controlling your diabetes. The test can also be used to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes. Find a CareNow® clinic near you Sugar attaches to hemoglobin in red blood cells, which carry oxygen to different parts of the body. Red blood cells typically live about three months. An abnormal A1C result means that you have had high blood sugar over a period of weeks to three months. How are A1C test results reported? Results are reported as a percentage. Here’s what A1C levels usually mean: Normal blood sugar levels (no diabetes): Less than 5.7 percent Prediabetes: 5.7 percent to 6.4 percent Diabetes: 6.5 percent or higher Your healthcare provider may report your results as eAG, or estimated average glucose. This number is reported in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl), which is the same number you would see on a blood glucose monitor. If you have anemia, kidney disease or certain blood disorders, your A1C test might give invalid results. Certain medicines can also make the results false. Before taking the test, talk to your healthcare provider about your health conditions and medications. What should you expect with an A1C test? The A1C test is a simple blood test. Blood can be drawn from a vein or the test can be done with a finger stick. You don’t need to do anything to prepare for the test. Fasting is not required. Most healthcare providers recommend people with diabetes get their A1C tested twice a year. If you are at increased risk for diabetes, ask a healthcare provider if you need an A1C test. Contact the nearest Care Continue reading >>

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Tests For Blood Sugar (glucose) And Hba1c

Urine test for blood sugar (glucose) Urine (produced by the kidneys) does not normally contain glucose. The kidneys filter our blood, keeping substances the body needs, while getting rid of waste products. Your kidneys constantly reabsorb glucose so that it doesn't enter your urine. However, if the glucose level goes above a certain level, the kidneys can't reabsorb all of the glucose. This means that some glucose will 'spill' through the kidneys into the urine. A simple dipstick test can detect glucose in a sample of urine. In a dipstick test a doctor or nurse uses a special chemical strip which he/she dips into a sample of your urine. Colour changes on the strip show whether there is glucose in the urine sample. If you have glucose in your urine, you are likely to have diabetes. However, some people have kidneys that are more 'leaky' and glucose may leak into urine with a normal blood level. Therefore, if your urine contains any glucose, you should have a blood test to measure the blood level of glucose to confirm, or rule out, diabetes. Blood tests for blood sugar (glucose) Random blood glucose level A sample of blood taken at any time can be a useful test if diabetes is suspected. A level of 11.1 mmol/L or more in the blood sample indicates that you have diabetes. A fasting blood glucose test may be done to confirm the diagnosis. Fasting blood glucose level A glucose level below 11.1 mmol/L on a random blood sample does not rule out diabetes. A blood test taken in the morning before you eat anything is a more accurate test. Do not eat or drink anything except water for 8-10 hours before a fasting blood glucose test. A level of 7.0 mmol/L or more indicates that you have diabetes. If you have no symptoms of diabetes but the blood test shows a glucose level of 7.0 mmol Continue reading >>

Diabetes Type 2

Diabetes Type 2

There are two sorts of blood glucose tests for people with diabetes. The HbA1c test which is done by a health professional and the 'finger-prick test' which you can do for yourself. The HbA1c or glycated haemoglobin test is usually done once a year by the GP or specialist nurse as part of the annual check-up for people with type 2 diabetes (see 'Care and treatment for type 2 diabetes'). The test measures the amount of glucose that the body's red blood cells are carrying and indicates how blood glucose levels have been over the previous 2 or 3 months. If the result is high the test can be repeated in a few months after changes in diet or treatment. The finger-prick test gives an instant reading or snapshot of the glucose level in the blood at that moment which indicates whether your diabetes is under control. Regular testing had made many people we talked to more aware of foods they needed to limit or avoid altogether, and that exercise could help to reduce blood glucose levels. Many people with diabetes feel that they are bound to have better control of their blood sugar if they can monitor it themselves on a regular basis. But several large studies have failed to confirm this, and found that regular monitoring by people who are not taking insulin often increases anxiety about normal ups and downs in blood glucose levels without improving long-term control. A large part of the NHS annual spend on diabetes is taken up by the inappropriate use of blood testing strips, so in many parts of the UK there are local guidelines aimed at restricting their availability to appropriate levels for each stage of diabetes. Blood glucose targets Everyone with diabetes is advised to try to keep their blood glucose levels steady and within the recommended range. For most people with diabe Continue reading >>

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