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Can You Develop Gestational Diabetes In Third Trimester?

Yoga For Gestational Diabetes

Yoga For Gestational Diabetes

by Holly Keich What is Gestational Diabetes? Normally, insulin, secreted continuously by the pancreas, acts like a key to open the door to cells in our muscles, liver and fat tissue so glucose can enter. When pregnant though, generally between the second and third trimester, the mother’s insulin requirement increases by 2 to 3 times above normal levels. (1) Also during pregnancy, the placenta produces hormones that help the baby grow and develop. These hormones however make cells less responsive to insulin. Consequently, during pregnancy, the mother’s body needs to produce higher amounts of insulin to keep her blood glucose levels within the normal range. Typically this would not be a problem and the pancreas would secrete more insulin to lower the blood glucose levels. It’s when the pancreas cannot produce enough insulin to control blood glucose levels that glucose intolerance develops. When this happens during pregnancy it is called Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM). After the baby is born, the mother’s blood glucose levels usually return to normal. It is estimated that Gestational Diabetes affects 18% of pregnancies (2) based on new diagnostic criteria developed in 2015 by the International Association of Diabetes in Pregnancy Study Group and the American Diabetes Association, with it’s prevalence increasing worldwide. GDM usually has no obvious symptoms, therefore diagnosis is typically made through an oral glucose challenge screening between 24 to 28 weeks of pregnancy.(3) If a woman tests positive during this screening test, a second test, called the Glucose Tolerance Test (or the 3-hour challenge), may be performed. This test will diagnose whether diabetes exists or not by indicating whether or not the body is using glucose effectively. (4) This scree Continue reading >>

Pregnancy And Diabetes: When And Why Your Blood Sugar Levels Matter Most

Pregnancy And Diabetes: When And Why Your Blood Sugar Levels Matter Most

The following is an excerpt from the book Pregnancy with Type 1 Diabetes by Ginger Vieira and Jennifer Smith, CDE & RD There are two things you can definitely expect will be said to you by total strangers, friends, and several family members because you have diabetes: “Doesn’t that mean your baby will be huge?” “So, is your baby probably going to get diabetes, too?” Both questions are rather rude–sure–but both implications are also very far from accurate. Yes: persistent high blood sugars during pregnancy can lead to a larger baby…but people without diabetes have very large babies, too. And people with diabetes have good ol’ fashioned regularly sized babies, too. There is no way to assure the size of a baby at birth. Skinny women can have huge babies just like an overweight woman can give birth to a very small baby. Women who eat a lot during pregnancy can have small babies! Very little of this is in our control. In the end, you can manage your diabetes extremely tightly and still have a larger than average baby because blood sugar control is not the only thing that impacts the size of your baby at birth, and more importantly, a larger baby is not the only or even most important complication a baby can experience due to mom’s elevated blood sugar levels. No: just because you have diabetes definitely does not mean your baby will have diabetes! And guess what, there’s nothing you can do during pregnancy to prevent or reduce your baby’s risk of developing diabetes…at least not that science and research is aware of at this time. So take a very deep breath, mama, because that is not something you can control, and your baby’s risk of developing type 1 diabetes is actually only about 2 percent higher than the risk of a non-diabetic woman’s baby de Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Home » About Diabetes » Pregnancy » Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is the type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. Like other forms od diabetes, gestational diabetes affects the way the body uses the glucose [sugar] in the blood and as a result the blood sugars rise too high. The glucose in the blood is the body’s main source of energy. If gestational diabetes is untreated or uncontrolled, it can result in a variety of health problems for both that mother and baby. So it is important that a treatment plan is worked out to keep blood sugars within the normal range. The good news is that controlling blood sugars can help to ensure a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. Signs and Symptoms Most women do not have any signs or symptoms of gestational diabetes but your healthcare professional will check for gestational diabetes as part of your prenatal care. When signs and symptoms do occur they include: Excessive thirst Increased urination. About 3 to 5% of all pregnant women develop gestational diabetes. The Causes of Gestational Diabetes Normal metabolism Normally during digestion the body breaks down the carbohydrates you eat into simple sugars [glucose] and this glucose is absorbed into the blood and transported around the body by the blood vessel system to provide the energy needed for all our activities. This process cannot take place without insulin. Insulin is produced in the pancreas, a gland behind the stomach, and helps the glucose to pass into the cells to provide energy and maintains normal levels of glucose in the blood. The liver also plays a part in maintaining normal blood glucose levels. When there is more glucose in the cells than your body needs for energy, it is removed from the blood and stored it in the liver Continue reading >>

Healthy Pregnancy Series: Gestational Diabetes Test

Healthy Pregnancy Series: Gestational Diabetes Test

When you’re at the end of your second trimester or beginning of your third trimester, most practitioners like to do the gestational diabetes test. (If you are showing symptoms, your doctor will do this earlier as needed.) It is routine for all pregnant women, however, around 28 weeks, and many practitioners require it. What Is It? The gestational diabetes test checks to see if you have gestational diabetes — that is, if your blood sugar is too high only while you are pregnant (however, if so — you are at risk of developing diabetes later in life). If you have it, you’ll require a special sugar-free diet to control your blood sugar, and a few women even need insulin (but this is rare). There are two different tests, and most women take the first kind. The one-hour test doesn’t require fasting; you eat normally. Then, one hour before you take the test, you’ll drink a 50-mL glucose solution. Normally, you’ll have been given this at your last appointment so you can drink it at home. When you arrive, they’ll ask you what time you finished drinking the solution so they can take your blood as close to one hour later as they can. They’ll draw some blood and check out what your blood sugar is (they will probably also check for anemia). If it is within a normal range, around 100, then you are fine. If it is elevated, suggesting that you’re not metabolizing sugar well, then they will ask you to take the second test. The three-hour test does require fasting, so it’s usually completed in the morning. You won’t eat for 12 hours beforehand (or as your doctor instructs). You’ll be given a 100-mL glucose solution to drink, and your blood sugar will be tested at 1, 2, and 3 hours after to see how you are metabolizing the sugar. This test is more accurate than th Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is one of the most common health problems of pregnancy. Between 2 and 10 percent of expectant mothers develop this condition, usually around the 24th week of pregnancy. Most women who develop gestational diabetes do not remain diabetic after the baby is born. Once you have had gestational diabetes you are at higher risk of getting it again during your future pregnancies and for developing diabetes later in life. What is Gestational Diabetes? There are many kinds of diabetes, but to put it simply, it means that you have abnormally high levels of sugar in your blood. It affects how your cells use sugar, also known as glucose, which is your body’s main fuel. When you eat, your digestive system breaks down most of your food into glucose which then enters your bloodstream. With the help of insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, your cells use the glucose to fuel your body. However, if your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or doesn’t accept the insulin then too much glucose stays in your blood stream instead of moving into the cells and getting converted into energy. During pregnancy, the placenta that connects your baby to your blood supply produces high levels of various hormones. Almost all of these hormones impair the action of insulin in your cells, which raises your blood sugar. As your baby grows, the placenta produces more and more insulin blocking hormones. In gestational diabetes, the abnormally high levels of blood sugar can affect the growth and health of your baby. What are the Symptoms? Most women will not experience noticeable symptoms of gestational diabetes, but some will feel excessively thirsty and urinate more frequently. How Will I Know if I Have Gestational Diabetes? Testing for gestational diabetes is a part of your regu Continue reading >>

Special Health Concerns During Pregnancy

Special Health Concerns During Pregnancy

Pregnancy makes you more aware of your body. It also brings a long list of changes, so it's not always easy to know when to call your healthcare provider. Here's a look at some of the common complications women may experience - and what to do if they happen to you. Vaginal Bleeding One quarter of pregnant women will have some spotting or light vaginal bleeding. Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy is more common among women who have been pregnant before than in women who are pregnant for the first time. A small amount of bleeding in the first trimester doesn't mean you're having a miscarriage, but vaginal bleeding in the second or third trimester may be serious. When you call your healthcare provider, let them know the following: What colour is the blood? pink, brown or red? Are there any clots in the blood? When did it start? What were you doing when it started? How much is there? For example, is it spotting the size of a quarter, or soaking your underwear? Did it happen after intercourse or a vaginal examination? Are you having cramps, pain, or any other symptoms? Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy is always a concern. If you have bleeding or spotting, stop whatever you're doing and talk to your healthcare provider immediately. Gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes can develop during pregnancy when hormones change the way your body uses insulin. Sometimes, a pregnant woman has been living with diabetes without knowing it. Symptoms of diabetes may include: Increased thirst. Increased urination. Increased hunger. Blurred vision. Pregnancy causes most women to urinate more often and to feel hungrier, so having these symptoms does not always mean that a woman has diabetes. Regular exercise and a healthy diet can help keep your blood sugar level within a target range and p Continue reading >>

Original Research Hba1c As A Predictor Of Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Original Research Hba1c As A Predictor Of Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Highlights • Third-trimester HbA1c was investigated as a predictor of diabetes following GDM. • After five years, 73/196 (37%) of the women had developed diabetes. • HbA1c ≥36 mmol/mol (≥5.4%) was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of diabetes. • HbA1c showed high specificity but low sensitivity to predict diabetes post-partum. • HbA1c could be used as a means of selecting high-risk women for interventions. Abstract We wanted to investigate third-trimester HbA1c as a predictor of diabetes after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Women with GDM were followed up prospectively for five years from pregnancy to detect the development of diabetes. The ability of HbA1c to predict diabetes was evaluated with receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and logistic regression analysis. By five years, 73 of 196 women had been diagnosed with diabetes. An optimal cut-off point for HbA1c of 36 mmol/mol (5.4%) could predict diabetes with 45% sensitivity and 92% specificity. For HbA1c ≥39 mmol/mol (≥5.7%), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were 30%, 97%, and 91%, respectively. In logistic regression analysis, adjusting for the diagnostic glucose concentration during pregnancy, HbA1c levels in the upper quartile (≥36 mmol/mol) were associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of diabetes. Third-trimester HbA1c levels in the pre-diabetes range revealed women with post-partum diabetes with high specificity and high positive predictive value. HbA1c testing could be used as a strategy to select high-risk women for lifestyle interventions aimed at prevention of diabetes starting during pregnancy. The results should encourage further validation in other populations using new diagnostic criteria for GDM. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

How To Eat Paleo During Pregnancy: A Guide To Every Trimester

How To Eat Paleo During Pregnancy: A Guide To Every Trimester

How to eat Paleo during Pregnancy: A guide to every trimester Wow! Almost there...if you're like like most women you're starting to nest and get ready to meet this new little person who's been growing inside you for months. Your baby is growing and displacing your organs including your stomach. This means that you're likely not able to eat very much in one sitting. There are a lot of hormonal changes going on and you're body's insulin response is rapidly changing...curious? Well then, let's jump right into this next post and chat about what to eat in the third trimester. As I mentioned before, your tummy is being displaced by your growing baby and eating large meals just isn't an option anymore. If you haven't done so already, it's time to shift your focus from food quantity to food quality. I know that the idea of grazing or eating multiple mini meals is contrary to what many in the paleo world endorse, however, pregnancy is different. Intermittent fasting with infrequent large meals has no place in a healthy pregnancy. You should aim for 4-6 small meals spread through the day and night. Here's an interactive video that shows you where all your organs go! Sounds gross but it's really cool (or at least I think so). Many women also find that they are waking up A LOT through the night. Perhaps you have to pee every few hours or you just wake up rather randomly your body is preparing you to be up feeding a baby every 3-4 hrs and is just trying to ease you into this rhythm. Many women find themselves hungry when they wake up...please eat! Subtle drops in blood sugar can actually wake you up out of a deep sleep. Include some carbohydrate in your snack to help boost serotonin levels and help you get back to sleep. Sweet potato, warm apple with cinnamon, mashed pumpkin, chia Continue reading >>

Welcome To Auckland Obstetric Centre

Welcome To Auckland Obstetric Centre

This is to check your blood groupand rhesus group (positive or negative). Blood group antibodies are also checked. Blood group antibodies can interfere with cross matching blood for a transfusion or cause anaemia in a developing baby. This is to confirm that you are immune to rubella (also called German measles). Most women will have been vaccinated against rubella in childhood but a few women will have little or no immunity. This is to check for previous infection or immunity to hepatitis B. Hepatitis B carriers can pass hepatitis onto their children. There are very effective treatments thatcan prevent hepatitis B being passed onto your babyafter it is born. Occasionally, hepatitis B carriers will also need treatment with anti-viral drugs in pregnancy. This screens for syphilis. This is now a rare disease but if detected treatment in pregnancy can prevent baby being infected. HIV (the virus that causes AIDS) is still rare in pregnant women in New Zealand but carriers can infect their unborn child. Treatments are very effective in reducing the risk of fetal infection in women found to be carriers for HIV. A urine sample can check for unexpected urine infection or the presence of bacteria in your urine that increases your risk of kidney infections later in pregnancy. This is a measure of a womans blood sugar levels over the previous few weeks. High levels can indicate underlying diabetes or that you are more likely todevelop diabetes later in your pregnancy.Women are more likely to developdiabetes in pregnancy if they are overweight, have polycystic ovaries or have a family history of diabetes. Infections such as Chlamydia, which often cause few or no symptoms, can be checked for in pregnancy, though we usually wait until between 12 and 18 weeks to screen for this. At 1 Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

High Blood Sugar in Pregnancy Gestational diabetes is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. The term 'gestational' refers to pregnancy. When a woman develops high blood glucose (sugar) during pregnancy but has never had elevated blood glucose in the past, she is diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes affects how the cells use glucose, the body's main fuel source. Gestational diabetes causes high blood glucose levels that can adversely affect pregnancy and the baby's health. The good news is that expectant mothers can help control gestational diabetes by exercising and eating healthy foods ensuring a healthy pregnancy and baby. Gestational diabetes mellitus and type II diabetes mellitus are different problems but have some key similarities. In either case, your insulin is not working well or it is not being produced in sufficient supply to keep blood glucose levels normal. In pregnancy, some insulin resistance is expected, as the placenta makes hormones that work against insulin. But as long as the pancreas can keep up with the demand to counteract the pregnancy hormones from the placenta, blood glucose levels can remain normal. If the pancreas cannot keep up, then gestational diabetes is the result. Risks Factors for Gestational Diabetes Pregnant women with any of the following appear to be at an increased risk for developing gestational diabetes; the risk increases when multiple risk factors are present. They include: Obesity Glycosuria - sugar in your urine Family history of diabetes You have a prior history of gestational diabetes in previous pregnancies If you are of Black, Hispanic, Asian or American Indian descent Over the age of 25 What are the Risks to Babies Born to Mothers with Gestational Diabetes? Gestational Diabetes affects yo Continue reading >>

Lack Of Sleep In Pregnancy May Contribute To Gestational Diabetes; Try These Foods For Better Sleep

Lack Of Sleep In Pregnancy May Contribute To Gestational Diabetes; Try These Foods For Better Sleep

Lack of Sleep in Pregnancy May Contribute to Gestational Diabetes; Try these Foods for Better Sleep Lack of Sleep in Pregnancy May Contribute to Gestational Diabetes; Try these Foods for Better Sleep Lack of Sleep in Pregnancy May Contribute to Gestational Diabetes; Try these Foods for Better Sleep Pregnant women may develop gestational diabetes due to lack of sleep or any other sleeping disorders. According to the study published in the journal of Sleep Medicine Reviews, the amount of time spent sleeping has dropped significantly in the past 20 years with almost a quarter of women and 16 percent men experiencing insufficient sleep. Food NDTV Food Desk Updated: October 17, 2017 18:49 IST Pregnant women may develop gestational diabetes due to lack of sleep Short sleep duration may lead to elevated blood sugar levels Pregnant women may develop gestational diabetes due to lack of sleep or any other sleeping disorders. According to the study published in the journal of Sleep Medicine Reviews, the amount of time spent sleeping has dropped significantly in the past 20 years with almost a quarter of women and 16 percent men experiencing insufficient sleep. "Links between reduced sleep duration and increased diabetes risk have been reported in several large studies in non-pregnant populations," said Dr. Sirimon Reutrakul, associate professor at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine. The research has also linked short sleep duration to elevated blood sugar levels in pregnant women; however, many of them were small. "More information is needed to determine if short sleep duration is a contributing factor to the development of gestational diabetes," said Reutrakul who's also the lead author of the study. Pregnant women are said to suffer gestational diabetes, Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is gestational diabetes (GDM)? GDM is a type of diabetes that develops during pregnancy, usually in the second or third trimester. GDM causes your blood sugar level to rise too high. This can harm you and your unborn baby. Blood sugar levels usually go back to normal after you give birth. What causes GDM? The cause of GDM is not known. The hormones made by the placenta may cause insulin resistance. Insulin helps move sugar out of the blood so it can be used for energy. Insulin resistance means your pancreas makes insulin, but your body cannot use it. As the placenta grows, more of these hormones are produced. The hormones block insulin and cause your blood sugar level to rise. What increases my risk for GDM? Lack of exercise A close family member with diabetes A history of high blood sugar, high blood pressure, or high cholesterol Being overweight or obese Previous delivery of a large baby Glycosuria (sugar in your urine) or polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) Being African American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, or Pacific Islander heritage What are the signs and symptoms of GDM? More hunger or thirst than usual Frequent urination Blurred vision More fatigue (tired) than usual Frequent bladder, vaginal, or skin infections More weight gain than your healthcare provider suggests during your pregnancy Nausea or vomiting How is GDM diagnosed? An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. Your healthcare provider may order either a one-step or two-step OGTT. One-step OGTT: Your blood sugar will be tested after you have not eaten for 8 hours (fasting). You will then be given a glucose drink. Your blood sugar will be tested again 1 hour and 2 hours after you finish the drink. Two-step OGTT: You Continue reading >>

The Paleo Diet And Pregnancy - The Third Trimester

The Paleo Diet And Pregnancy - The Third Trimester

Home / Blog / The Paleo Diet And Pregnancy - The Third Trimester The Paleo Diet And Pregnancy - The Third Trimester This articles forms part of a series covering the Paleo diet and lifestyle to support reproduction from fertility to conception, pregnancy and nursing. PART5 - Third Trimester Pregnancy Gripes During the third trimester, week 28 week 40 of pregnancy, the physical demands on the mothers body reach their peak. The baby starts to receive signals from all five senses. The brain develops more than in any other trimester. The soft cartilage throughout the body is transformed into bones that make up the skeletal structure. Skin, hair and nails begin to develop. Around week 34 the baby starts to turn southward in preparation for delivery and in the final weeks of pregnancy, the meconium (an infants first bowel movements) build up in the intestines. During this time many women begin to experience some undesirable physical symptoms. As a result of this increased energy demand, expecting moms may lose some of that energy they regained in the second trimester. Backaches, fatigue and stretch marks may occur as both baby and moms body grow bigger. As the baby grows it starts displacing organs including the stomach resulting in some eating and digestive challenges. Hormonal changes and the bodys insulin response are shifting. Maintaining a Paleo diet and ensuring both mom and baby are receiving nutrient dense, whole foods will play a large part in helping to alleviate many of moms symptoms while setting both mom and baby up for helth and strength both through birth and beyond. Your growing baby is displacing much of your stomach and eating large meals is becoming more of a challenge. This is the time to be extra observant of the quality of the food you eat. Often, the i Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Gestational Diabetes During Pregnancy

Has your doctor diagnosed you with gestational diabetes (GD or GDM), a form of diabetes that appears only during pregnancy? While it might feel overwhelming at first, it turns out that this pregnancy complication is much more common than you might think. In fact, up to 9.2 percent of pregnant women have GD, according to a 2014 analysis by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Know that with careful monitoring and treatment, it can be managed, and you can have a safe and healthy pregnancy. READ MORE: What causes gestational diabetes? Who's most at risk? What are the symptoms? How is it diagnosed? What are the complications? How can you prevent gestational diabetes? How is it treated? What happens to mom and baby after birth? What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes usually starts between week 24 and week 28 of pregnancy when hormones from the placenta block insulin — a hormone produced in the pancreas that regulates the body's metabolism of fats and carbs and helps the body turn sugar into energy — from doing its job and prevent the body from regulating the increased blood sugar of pregnancy effectively. This causes hyperglycemia (or high levels of sugar in the blood), which can damage the nerves, blood vessels and organs in your body. Who’s most at risk for gestational diabetes? While researchers aren't certain why some women get gestational diabetes while others don’t, they do know that you may be at an increased risk if: You are overweight. Having a BMI of 30 or more going into pregnancy is one of the most common risk factors for gestational diabetes because the extra weight affects insulin's ability to properly keep blood sugar levels in check. You have a higher level of abdominal fat. Recent research published in the American Di Continue reading >>

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