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Can You Claim Disability With Diabetes

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

Disability Benefits for Uncontrolled Diabetes and Severe Diabetic Complications This is a guest post by Molly Clarke. Molly is the Social Media Coordinator for Social Security Disability Help. She contributes regularly to the Social Security Disability Help blog where she works to promote disability awareness and assist individuals throughout the disability application process. Diabetes is a fairly common medical condition that can often be controlled with medication and lifestyle changes. Unfortunately, not every diabetic is able to manage their symptoms. When diabetes cannot be controlled, serious health complications can arise. These may include kidney disease, vision loss, neuropathy, or tissue necrosis. Serious side effects such as these can make it impossible to maintain employment and earn a living. If—despite following medical instructions—serious complications keep you from working, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits.  The following article will give you a general overview of Social Security Disability and will provide you with the information needed to begin the application process. The Social Security Administration is responsible for two different types of benefits. These are: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - this type of benefit is offered to disabled workers and their dependent family members. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) - this type of benefit is offered to elderly, blind, or disabled individuals who earn very little income. To qualify for benefits from either program, you must first meet the SSA’s definition of disability. This definition is comprised of the following: You are considered to have a disability if you suffer from a medical condition(s) that prevents gainful employment (Gainful employment i Continue reading >>

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Claim Disability Benefits If You Have Diabetes?

There’s a lot to take in when you, or someone you love, is diagnosed with diabetes. Finding out what benefits you might be entitled to, now or in future, may not be top of your to-do list so here’s a quick overview. Is diabetes a disability? Under the 2010 Equality Act, type 1 diabetes is defined as a disability, in that it may have a ‘substantial, long-term, negative impact on a person’s ability to carry out normal, day-to-day activities’. Many people with type 2 diabetes are also covered by this definition. The aim is protect you from discrimination, such as needing time out during the working day to check your blood sugar levels or recover from a 'hypo' (low blood sugar) episode. It sounds confusing, but if your diabetes is being controlled by medication or diet, the impact of your condition on ‘normal activities’ is decided as if you were not taking medication or following a managed diet i.e. if you were not taking insulin to treat type 1 diabetes, this would have a severe impact on your abilities (it could even be fatal) and so is considered a disability. What can I claim for? If you have either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you will be eligible for certain benefits, depending on the extent to which your condition affects your life. For example, everyone in the UK with diabetes is entitled to free eye checks from the age of 12 – once yearly screening for diabetic retinopathy. And if you’re on any medication for your diabetes, you’ll receive free prescriptions. There are additional benefits available to those with diabetes related to disability and long-term health, such as if you need help or if you’re unable to work. Whether or not you’re eligible depends on factors like additional health issues and how much diabetes affects your day-to-day ac Continue reading >>

Can I Qualify For Disability If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Qualify For Disability If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Qualify for Disability if I Have Diabetes? As a condition that over 25 million children and adults suffer from, diabetes is a highly prevalent medical problem for Americans. Whether it is type 1 diabetes, in which the body simply does not produce insulin, or type 2 diabetes, in which the body develops a resistance to insulin (also called hyperglycemia due to the rise in blood glucose levels), every day, people across the country struggle to adapt to this condition. In fact, there are treatments available that can diminish the effects of diabetes on the body and allow people suffering from diabetes to lead normal, productive lives. If diabetes is so manageable, does that mean that you cannot apply for disability because of diabetes? In many cases, the answer would be no. Most cases of diabetes are manageable with proper treatment, and in order to qualify for disability, your condition has to continue to be disabling despite the application of recommended medical treatment. However, just because diabetes is the condition you suffer from, that does not mean that you have no chance of qualifying for Social Security Disability benefits . While not usually considered disabling on its own, diabetes can cause numerous other conditions that can qualify as being disabling enough for SSDI benefits. One of the effects diabetes can have on the body is the restriction of blood flow to the limbs, particularly the legs. According to the American Diabetes Association statistics page, over 65,000 lower-limb amputations had to be performed on people suffering from diabetes. Anyone whose employment requires the use of his or her legs would likely be permanently disabled by such a procedure. However, it is important to preserve any medical records proving the necessity of the amputat Continue reading >>

Disability Determination For Diabetes

Disability Determination For Diabetes

Diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, is a disorder in which too little insulin is produced in the body. Insulin is necessary to help convert glucose (a form of sugar) into the body's cells for energy. When not enough insulin is produced, it causes a build up of glucose in the blood. Symptoms of diabetes include fatigue, frequent urination, abnormal thirst, unusual hunger, weight loss, repeated infections, cuts that are slow to heal, and tingling or numbness in the hands and feet. Type 1 diabetes is ordinarily diagnosed in children and younger adults, and it is a type of diabetes in which the body produces no insulin. In type 2 diabetes, or adult onset diabetes, your body's cells ignore the effects of insulin. When diabetes goes untreated and too much glucose builds up in your body, long-term complications can result. These include neuropathy in your feet (nerve damage and a loss of feeling), kidney disease (nephropathy), high blood pressure (hypertension), heart disease, stroke, gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage in which food stays too long in the stomach), eye and vision problems, peripheral arterial disease (blood vessels in your legs become blocked and blood flow is decreased), and depression. Treatment of severe diabetes involves the careful monitoring of blood glucose levels along with taking insulin and controlling your diet. Your doctor can test you for diabetes using a fasting blood glucose test. Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least a year (or longer), then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplement Security Income (SSI) benefits. It is generally easier to obtain disability benefits if you have developed long-term complications from you Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Social Security Disability For Diabetes (type I Or Type Ii)

Diabetes happens when the body doesn't produce enough insulin to process glucose. Diabetes can often be controlled with treatment -- a combination of medication and diet. As a person gets older, sometimes diabetes can't be controlled, and then it can cause damage to internal organs and other problems. Symptoms and Complications of Adult Diabetes Symptoms of both diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2 include frequent urination, unusual thirst and hunger, and extreme fatigue. People with type 2 diabetes also can suffer from tingling or numbness in the hands and feet, frequent infections, and cuts that are slow to heal. Complications from diabetes include: retinopathy (eye and vision problems) nephropathy (kidney disease) neuropathy (nerve damage) in feet or hands that disrupts your ability to stand, walk, or use your hands hypertension (high blood pressure) gastroparesis (a type of nerve damage that interferes with digestion) peripheral arterial disease (reduced blood flow to your limbs) cellulitis (skin infections), and Qualifying for Disability Benefits with Diabetes If you have uncontrolled diabetes and you have been prevented from working for at least 12 months, or you expect that you won't be able to work for at least 12 months, then you may be eligible for Social Security disability (SSDI/SSD) benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. But to qualify for disability benefits, the damage caused by your diabetes must severely limit what you can do, or you must have complications that fulfill the requirements of one of Social Security's disability listings. If your diabetes is uncontrolled because you don't follow your doctor's prescribed treatment, you won't be eligible for disability. For more information, see our article on failing to comply with treatmen Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

If you are diabetic and unable to work because of your diabetes you may want to know if you qualify for social security disability benefits and how can you win your disability application. This article will give you a look at how I approach a SSDI or SSI claim to put in the best light possible for success at a financial future when your diabetes prevents you from working. How is Diabetes Defined by Social Security Social security used to recognize diabetes as one of its listed disorders. This means that if certain criteria are met then you are found disabled without regard to what you can or can not do in terms of basic work activities. However in 201l social security did away with the listing and only kept a new portion of it that gave what the ssa administration called guidance. (1) The social security administration guidance still is instructive in determining disability for diabetes as the “guidance” they give in listing 9.00 discusses in general endocrine disorders and how they can be disabling. Watch Tips for Diabetics and SSDI As paraphrased from listing 9.00, Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic gland disorder that disrupts the production of insulin. There are two types of diabetic disorders . Type 1 Diabetes: This goes by the name of insulin dependant diabetes or juvenile diabetes. It is an absolute deficiency in insulin that commonly begins in childhood and is a chronic lifelong illness. Type 2 Diabetes: This is often call adult onset or non insulin dependant where the cells of the body fight off insulin affecting blood sugar metabolism. In some cases diabetes can be controlled and in others it is not controlled well. These are usually the persons that end up with severe symptoms that affect their ability to work . Statistics on Diabetes Are Staggering The nu Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Social Security Disability Insurance

Diabetes & Social Security Disability Insurance

Determine if an individual is working (engaging in substantial gainful activity) according to the SSA definition. Earning more than $1,170 a month as an employee is enough to be disqualified from receiving Social Security disability benefits. Conclude the diabetes disability must be severe enough to significantly limit one’s ability to perform basic work activities needed to do most jobs. For example: Walking, standing, sitting, lifting, pushing, pulling, reaching, carrying or handling Understanding/carrying out and remembering simple instructions Responding appropriately to supervision, co-workers and usual work situations Evaluate impairments that result from endocrine disorders under SSA medical listings for other body systems. For example: Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) is an acute, potentially life-threatening complication of Diabetes Mellitis (DM) and usually requires hospital treatment to correct the acute complications of dehydration, electrolyte imbalance and insulin deficiency. You may have serious complications resulting from your treatment, which the SSA evaluates under the affected body system. For example, the SSA evaluates cardiac arrhythmias under the Cardiovascular System (4.00), intestinal necrosis under the Digestive System (5.00) and cerebral edema and seizures under Neurological (11.00). Recurrent episodes of DKA may result from mood or eating disorders, which SSA evaluates under Mental Disorders (12.00). Explore the ability of an individual to perform work they have done in the past despite their diabetes. If the SSA finds that a person can do his past work, benefits are denied. If the person cannot, then the process proceeds to the fifth and final step. Review age, education, work experience and physical/mental condition to determine what other wor Continue reading >>

Disability Living Allowance (dla) And Diabetes

Disability Living Allowance (dla) And Diabetes

Tweet Parents of children with diabetes who are under the age of 16 may be entitled to a tax-free social security benefit called Disability Living Allowance (DLA). DLA may be available if your child needs more care and assistance than other children their age. Is DLA means tested? DLA is not means tested, which means that it makes no difference how much money you or your child or your family get in income or from savings. How much benefit can I receive? Disability Living Allowance is available over 3 care rates and 2 mobility rates. If your child has care and mobility needs, he or she may qualify to receive benefits from both the care and mobility components. Fig 1: How much benefit can I receive? Benefit Tier Care Component Mobility Component Lower £21 £21 Middle £53 - High £79.15 £55.25 The rate is how much will be paid per week. You can usually expect to receive the payments once every 4 weeks and the money received will be tax free. Is my child eligible for DLA? *In May 2016, the Department of Work and Pensions updated their DLA guidelines for children with type 1 diabetes, stating that children up to the age of 16 will need help from parents and carers during the day. The new guidelines are designed to make it easier for parents claiming for children aged 12 years or older who require day-to-day assistance managing their diabetes. Children with diabetes are more likely to be eligible for the care component unless they have an additional health difficulty that affects their mobility. Your child may be eligible for the lower rate of DLA if they require some care and supervision, beyond that of other children their age, through some of the day or night. The middle care rate is available if your child requires frequent help or constant supervision through the day Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes

Social Security Disability Benefits for Diabetes If you have diabetes and can’t work, you may qualify for Social Security Disability benefits. Whether you have type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, if you can’t work, you can apply for disability benefits with the Social Security Administration (SSA). Winning disability benefits when you have diabetes can be difficult, but success is possible. On its own, having diabetes is not guaranteed to win you benefits, you must prove you have complications from your diabetes that prevents you from working. Whether your have type 1 or type diabetes, make sure you’re following your doctor’s treatment plan. If you don’t you won’t be eligible for benefits. Symptoms of Adult Diabetes and Social Security Disability Benefits The SSA does not consider a diagnosis of diabetes alone enough to qualify for benefits. You must show that you have symptoms that prevent you from working. Some of the complications from diabetes include: nerve damage (especially in the hands and feet) If you suffer from complications from diabetes and can no longer work, you will most likely have a stronger case to present to the SSA. It’s very important that you follow all of your doctor’s orders for treatment. If you don’t, it can hurt your claim for benefits. If Your Diabetes Stops You From Working, You Should Apply No matter the severity of your diabetes – and whether it’s type 1 or type 2 – you must prove to the SSA that you can’t work because of your condition(s). It’s important to have a history of medical records from any doctors or medical specialists that treat your diabetes. The more evidence you have, the easier it is to paint a clear picture of how your condition limits you when you present it to the SSA. If you’re denied af Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes - Condition Diabetes is a medical condition in which a person’s level of glucose, or blood sugar, is elevated. In a properly functioning circulatory system, blood carries glucose to all the cells in the body in order to produce energy, while the pancreas produces insulin to help the body absorb excess glucose. High levels of glucose in the blood are an indication that the body is not producing enough insulin, or that the insulin produced is not working as it should to help the body absorb glucose, indicating a Diabetic or pre-Diabetic condition. There are three types of Diabetes: Type 1, or “juvenile” Diabetes Type 2, or “adult onset” Diabetes, and Gestational Diabetes Diabetes mellitus is the medical name for both Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes. Pre-Diabetes is a condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, indicating that an individual has a high risk of developing full-fledged Diabetes. Diabetes is a very serious disease which can result in high blood pressure, damage to the eyes, nerve damage, kidney disease, heart disease, blindness, and stroke. In addition, it is not uncommon for a long term diabetic to loose limbs to amputation because of poor circulation. Symptoms The presence of Diabetes is generally indicated by some combination of several symptoms. A diabetic will often experience unexplained: frequent need to urinate, especially if it is combined with extreme thirst, chronic hunger, especially between meals, fatigue, weight loss, and/or general feelings of irritability Many diabetics report dry, itchy skin and trouble with genital itching and fungal infections. A tingling sensation or numbness in the feet is another indication, as is blurred vision. Finally, the skin of many diabetics is slow to heal from wounds, skin abrasions, or so Continue reading >>

Can I Work With Diabetes?

Can I Work With Diabetes?

Both Type I and Type II Diabetes, as well as the other forms of diabetes, can be debilitating if not controlled. Many can and do qualify for Social Security Disability benefits because of diabetes. However, simply having diabetes does not automatically qualify you for Social Security Disability benefits. Your eligibility for Social Security Disability depends on which symptoms you have and their severity. You may also qualify for Social Security Disability benefits due to diabetes-related conditions, such as having amputated limbs or blindness. Diabetes is a digestive disease which affects your insulin levels. Because of the imbalance in insulin, your levels of blood sugar become elevated. This causes an increase in hunger and thirst and frequent urination. A common side effect of the constant hunger associated with high blood sugar levels and diabetes is weight gain and obesity. Additional symptoms include abdominal pain, altered consciousness, vomiting, nausea, and dehydration (usually due to craving sweet or caffeinated drinks to quench thirst). Nearly 3% of the world’s population suffers from some form of diabetes, making it one of the most prevalent diseases in the world. Effects of Diabetes on Your Ability to Perform Physical Work Depending on the severity of your symptoms, and which symptoms you suffer from (some people with Type II Diabetes have no noticeable symptoms at all), your ability to perform physical work may or may not be affected. In order to be eligible for Social security Disability benefits, you must be unable to perform any kind of work which you have ever done in the past, and the SSA must determine that you could not reasonably be trained to do any other kind of work. In order to qualify for Social Security Disability benefits from diabetes, y Continue reading >>

If Filing A Social Security Disability Claim For Diabetes – Better Follow Doctors Orders

If Filing A Social Security Disability Claim For Diabetes – Better Follow Doctors Orders

Diabetes People with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) may be surprised to hear that SSA had proposed taking the condition out of the list of disabling conditions. Although for years diabetes had been considered a condition severe enough to be disabling, the conditions are now more readily detectable and well managed – that it is simply not as disabling as it used to be. It is thought that even people with recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia or diabetic acidosis do not remain in these states long enough to be disabled. If you are considering filing a Social Security disability claim for diabetes, the key is showing diligent management of your health and still suffering from debilitating symptoms. When DM causes end-organ damage, there are other parts of the regulations which will still apply. For example, if the diabetes is so advanced that there is impact on cardiovascular, visual or kidney systems; disability is considered under those standards. The same is true of neuropathies and amputations. Current recipients of benefits would continue to receive checks. Although medical advances have been made, not all patients have access to good medical care. Despite dramatic recent improvement in medications, diabetes at severe levels can still control the lives of its victims. In practical terms, if a patient’s functional capacities are impacted, a viable claim for disability may still exist. This might include impaired ability to see or walk normally, or having hands or arms so affected by numbness that work is impossible. For example, can you write? Use a computer keyboard? Perform repetitive motions? Lift and carry over ten pounds on a regular basis? These are the factors that need to be made clear to SSA in a diabetes claim. Another factor to consider in a diabetes disability cla Continue reading >>

How To Get Disability For Diabetes

How To Get Disability For Diabetes

If you have type 1 or 2 diabetes and cannot work as a result, you might be wondering what your options are for financial assistance. While diet and medication can often control diabetes, there is no cure for the condition. The list of symptoms is long, ranging in severity from mild fatigue and excessive thirst to heart problems and nerve damage. Because diabetes affects different people in different ways, the Social Security Administration (SSA) no longer lists it as a condition that it considers disabling. Instead, it reserves benefits for those who have specific complications from the condition or can demonstrate that their condition prevents them from working. These are hazy distinctions. The strength of your disability application plays a big role in whether you receive approval. That is why you need the most skilled and experienced disability attorneys on your side. At the Law Offices of Ogle, Elrod & Baril, PLLC, our job is to win disability benefits for those with medical conditions that keep them from working. We have fought enough cases that we have a full understanding of how the process works. We know how to build a winning claim on your behalf. We want to put our experience and resources to work for you. Come in for a free consultation with our attorneys. You can have all your questions answered and get free advice on getting disability for diabetes. Call 866-423-9503 today for an appointment. How Do I Qualify for Disability Benefits With Diabetes? There are two ways to qualify for disability for diabetes. The first is through the SSA’s Blue Book. This is a list of medical impairments the SSA considers so severe that they are disabling. To qualify under a Blue Book listing, we must provide proof to the SSA that your condition meets their specific medical c Continue reading >>

Can You Receive Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Can You Receive Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Can You Receive Disability Benefits for Diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association, a total of 25.8 million children and adults in the United States8.3% of the populationhave diabetes . In 2007 alone, more than 70,000 death certificates listed diabetes as the underlying cause of death. Diabetes is known to result in such severe conditions as blindness, kidney disease, neuropathy, and even necrosis of the limbs (usually legs) that necessitates amputation. With such an extensive list of complications and a skyrocketing death toll, one might think that diabetes would be recognized as a disabling condition in the SSAs blue book. So, Does Diabetes Qualify for SSDI Benefits? The answer to this question is both yes and no. In and of itself, diabetes is not considered sufficiently disabling by the SSA, though it can cause disabling conditions that do qualify. This is because diabetes, when managed through an appropriate treatment regimen, does not typically interfere with a persons ability to engage in substantial gainful activity, i.e. work. One of the SSAs most important screening tests is to determine if you can continue to perform the work you had been doing before with reasonableaccommodations from your employer that do not cause an undue burden on said employer. For many diabetics, the accommodations that employers have to make are more than reasonable and do not pose an undue burden on their business. Because of this, people with diabetes are not commonly considered disabled. Over time, however, diabetes can result in conditions that the SSA does recognize as disabling, such as blindness and nervous system disease (neuropathy). In some severe cases, diabetics may require amputation of their extremities, such as their feet. Yet, not even these horrific symp Continue reading >>

Making A Living With Diabetes: Disability

Making A Living With Diabetes: Disability

Working a job with diabetes can be tough, sometimes impossible. If you run out of work options, you may qualify for disability pay. Here are some things to consider. The Social Security Administration (SSA) has two disability programs: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). SSDI is insurance most workers pay into through payroll taxes. Depending on how much you’ve paid into it, your monthly payments might range from about $700 to about $1,700 per month. SSI is not insurance. It’s a need-based program for people who haven’t paid payroll taxes. SSI maxes out at about $730 per month for an eligible person and $1,100 per month for an eligible person with an eligible spouse. Here’s a calculator that will give a very rough estimate how much you might get on SSDI. There are also private disability insurance plans you can buy into, or your employer may provide. Having one could make your life much easier, if you qualify as disabled. Should you consider disability? Nobody wants to go on disability. Work is too important a part of most people’s lives. Some people may feel they will be freeloading if they receive disability benefits. People will say you’re not contributing. I reject those thoughts totally. I relied on SSDI for 15 years, since I could no longer work as a nurse. I have always regarded it as government paying me to do good things. I write books and health articles; I volunteer. I take care of myself and try to be of service. Like most people on disability, I spent all the payments on necessities, helping keep the economy going. Being disabled might be embarrassing, but it can be lifesaving. A Forbes magazine piece quoted one woman with lung disease. “Emotionally, going on disability insurance was a Godsend, k Continue reading >>

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