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Can You Claim Disability For Diabetes?

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Can I Get Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes?

Diabetes refers to a group of illnesses that result from the body’s inability to effectively produce or use insulin. This condition is characterized by high blood glucose levels. Over time, high blood sugar levels can affect other bodily functions. For example, diabetes can affect the body’s ability to fight infections and can cause serious problems for the heart, kidneys, nerves, eyes, and feet. Whether your diabetes has been recently diagnosed or you have had it for years, the complications associated with this disease can make it difficult to get around, to take care of yourself, and to hold down a job. Diabetes Can Have Serious Complications If your diabetes is well managed and you do not suffer any complications, then you can continue to work and your Social Security disability application will be denied. However, many people are not that lucky. Diabetes can have significant complications that may make you eligible for Social Security disability. These side effects include: Neuropathy. Diabetes can result in nerve damage in the legs and feet. Retinopathy. Diabetes may affect your vision to the point where you are unable to perform your work duties. Organ damage. Diabetes can cause severe damage to organs such as the liver or kidneys. These complications can be devastating and result in your total disability. Are You Eligible for Social Security Disability? The Social Security Administration (SSA) uses a five-step process to determine whether a person with diabetes qualifies for Social Security disability benefits. Specifically, the SSA is going to ask: Are you working? If you are employed and earning more than $1,170 a month ($1,950 if you are blind), then your application will likely be denied—regardless of the severity of your diabetes. Is your disability s Continue reading >>

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

Social Security Disability Benefits For Diabetes – How Can You Win A Claim

If you are diabetic and unable to work because of your diabetes you may want to know if you qualify for social security disability benefits and how can you win your disability application. This article will give you a look at how I approach a SSDI or SSI claim to put in the best light possible for success at a financial future when your diabetes prevents you from working. How is Diabetes Defined by Social Security Social security used to recognize diabetes as one of its listed disorders. This means that if certain criteria are met then you are found disabled without regard to what you can or can not do in terms of basic work activities. However in 201l social security did away with the listing and only kept a new portion of it that gave what the ssa administration called guidance. (1) The social security administration guidance still is instructive in determining disability for diabetes as the “guidance” they give in listing 9.00 discusses in general endocrine disorders and how they can be disabling. Watch Tips for Diabetics and SSDI As paraphrased from listing 9.00, Diabetes mellitus is a pancreatic gland disorder that disrupts the production of insulin. There are two types of diabetic disorders . Type 1 Diabetes: This goes by the name of insulin dependant diabetes or juvenile diabetes. It is an absolute deficiency in insulin that commonly begins in childhood and is a chronic lifelong illness. Type 2 Diabetes: This is often call adult onset or non insulin dependant where the cells of the body fight off insulin affecting blood sugar metabolism. In some cases diabetes can be controlled and in others it is not controlled well. These are usually the persons that end up with severe symptoms that affect their ability to work . Statistics on Diabetes Are Staggering The nu Continue reading >>

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

Disability Benefits For Uncontrolled Diabetes And Severe Diabetic Complications

This is a guest post by Molly Clarke. Molly is the Social Media Coordinator for Social Security Disability Help. She contributes regularly to the Social Security Disability Help blog where she works to promote disability awareness and assist individuals throughout the disability application process. Diabetes is a fairly common medical condition that can often be controlled with medication and lifestyle changes. Unfortunately, not every diabetic is able to manage their symptoms. When diabetes cannot be controlled, serious health complications can arise. These may include kidney disease, vision loss, neuropathy, or tissue necrosis. Serious side effects such as these can make it impossible to maintain employment and earn a living. If—despite following medical instructions—serious complications keep you from working, you may be eligible for Social Security Disability benefits. The following article will give you a general overview of Social Security Disability and will provide you with the information needed to begin the application process. Overview and Basic Requirements The Social Security Administration is responsible for two different types of benefits. These are: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) - this type of benefit is offered to disabled workers and their dependent family members. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) - this type of benefit is offered to elderly, blind, or disabled individuals who earn very little income. To qualify for benefits from either program, you must first meet the SSA’s definition of disability. This definition is comprised of the following: You are considered to have a disability if you suffer from a medical condition(s) that prevents gainful employment (Gainful employment is considered to be $1,040 a month for a disabled in Continue reading >>

If Filing A Social Security Disability Claim For Diabetes – Better Follow Doctors Orders

If Filing A Social Security Disability Claim For Diabetes – Better Follow Doctors Orders

Diabetes People with Diabetes Mellitus (DM) may be surprised to hear that SSA had proposed taking the condition out of the list of disabling conditions. Although for years diabetes had been considered a condition severe enough to be disabling, the conditions are now more readily detectable and well managed – that it is simply not as disabling as it used to be. It is thought that even people with recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia or diabetic acidosis do not remain in these states long enough to be disabled. If you are considering filing a Social Security disability claim for diabetes, the key is showing diligent management of your health and still suffering from debilitating symptoms. When DM causes end-organ damage, there are other parts of the regulations which will still apply. For example, if the diabetes is so advanced that there is impact on cardiovascular, visual or kidney systems; disability is considered under those standards. The same is true of neuropathies and amputations. Current recipients of benefits would continue to receive checks. Although medical advances have been made, not all patients have access to good medical care. Despite dramatic recent improvement in medications, diabetes at severe levels can still control the lives of its victims. In practical terms, if a patient’s functional capacities are impacted, a viable claim for disability may still exist. This might include impaired ability to see or walk normally, or having hands or arms so affected by numbness that work is impossible. For example, can you write? Use a computer keyboard? Perform repetitive motions? Lift and carry over ten pounds on a regular basis? These are the factors that need to be made clear to SSA in a diabetes claim. Another factor to consider in a diabetes disability cla Continue reading >>

Could I Collect Social Security Disability Benefits For Gestational Diabetes?

Could I Collect Social Security Disability Benefits For Gestational Diabetes?

The health effects of diabetes can significantly impact a person’s ability to earn a living. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are recognized as potentially disabling conditions by the Social Security Administration (SSA), as the illnesses are likely to last for a person’s entire life. However, there is another form of diabetes that could qualify a woman for benefits: a serious condition called gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes causes blood sugar imbalances due to insufficient insulin and hormonal changes during pregnancy. Women who suffer from gestational diabetes are more likely to have difficult pregnancies and experience birthing complications, and are likelier to develop type 2 diabetes in the years following pregnancy. Social Security Requirements for Women With Gestational Diabetes Even though it is not a permanent condition, gestational diabetes is compensable under the Social Security listing for diabetes However, the listing requires that diabetes sufferers must be diagnosed with at least one other of the following disabling conditions in conjunction with diabetes mellitus: Neuropathy. Diabetic neuropathy is a numbness, tingling, or burning in the extremities, usually the feet and toes. The SSA will consider a claimant disabled if neuropathy significantly affects the arms, the legs, or one arm and one leg to the extent that movement is impaired. Patients can be considered “impaired” if they have trouble sitting, walking, standing, or changing positions. Acidosis. Diabetes can change the acidity of the blood, causing potentially fatal effects for the patient. Disabling acidosis must be documented by blood tests and occur at least once every two months. Retinopathy. Diabetes can damage blood vessels inside the eye, causing blurred vision or even b Continue reading >>

What Form Do I Need For A Va Disability Comp Claim For Diabetes

What Form Do I Need For A Va Disability Comp Claim For Diabetes

If you are filing your VA disability compensation claim using private health care options, you can use a DBQ form, Disability Benefits Questionnaire, to evaluate your disability. To file a VA disability compensation claim for diabetes mellitus you need to add claims for all applicable conditions associated with your diabetes mellitus. No matter how controlled, diabetes mellitus is a progressive disease. Diabetes Mellitus affects all systems, organs, and functions of the body and causes other conditions. You will need your Private Physician or Physicians to complete a DBQ’s for the diabetes mellitus and each related condition. The DBQ’s for diabetes mellitus and related conditions can be viewed, filled for printing, downloaded or printed for your Doctor at website: Or, VA DBQ Forms can be viewed, filled for printing, downloaded or printed for your Doctor at website: The following is a list of some of the DBQ Forms related to Diabetes Mellitus. If you have another condition related that is not listed, go to the websites above and obtain the VA DBQ form associated with your condition or conditions. VA-21-0960E-1 – Diabetes Mellitus VA-21-0960C-4 – Diabetic Sensory-Motor Peripheral Neuropathy VA-21-0960A-4 – Heart Conditions (diabetic heart disease) VA-21-0960A-3 – Hypertension VA-21-0960A-2 – Artery and Vein Conditions (diabetic vascular disease) VA-21-0960M-1 – Amputations (diabetic vascular disease) VA-21-0960G-1 – Esophageal Conditions (diabetic reflux) VA-21-0960G-7 – Stomach and Duodenal Conditions (diabetic changes) VA-21-0960J-1 – Kidney Conditions (diabetic kidney impairment) VA-21-0960M-6 – Foot Conditions (diabetic foot drop) VA-21-0960F-2 – Skin Conditions (diabetic dermatitis) VA-21-0960J-2 – Male Reproductive Organ Conditions (diabe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Benefits

Diabetes And Benefits

Tweet There are a number of free welfare benefits that may be available to people with diabetes if complications lead to difficulty in daily life. In addition, all people with diabetes mellitus in the UK are entitled to free eye checks and all people on diabetes medication should receive free prescriptions. In terms of the benefits related to long term health conditions and disabilities, eligibility for benefits depends on to what extent the life of an individual is affected by diabetes or any addition health issues. The most likely people to be eligible for these kind of benefits include: What is the purpose of disability benefits? The aim of disability benefits is to help those people that need it, whilst incapacity benefits are intended for those that, physically or mentally, are unable to work. What benefits are available to me? There are a number of benefits available for people with diabetes and/or their carers. Disability Living Allowance (DLA) Disability Living Allowance is available for people over the age of 16 years old with care and/or mobility needs. For care needs, there are three tiers of benefit from needing care for short periods up to care covering both night and day. For mobility needs there are two tiers, covering care for those who need guidance and the higher tier for people who find the act of moving around difficult. DLA for parents of children with diabetes Parents of diabetic children may also claim for disability living allowance if there are significant care needs above those of other children of the same age. Personal Independence Payment (PIP) In 2013, Personal Independence Payment replaced Disability Living Allowance for people between the ages of 16 and 64. For care needs, there are two tiers of benefit for both mobility and daily living Continue reading >>

Entitlements & Social Welfare Information

Entitlements & Social Welfare Information

This is a reasonable summary of entitlements for people with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes and their carers. However, if you are aware of others, Diabetes Ireland would like to hear from you. The information provided is for guidance only, please refer to the official sites for full details – www.revenue.ie and www.welfare.ie. For help with accessing information, completing forms or non-judgemental information on your entitlements, contact your local office of the Citizens Information Service. For details please see www.citizensinformation.ie. This section covers the following topics: Entitlements for Diabetes Management Long Term Illness Scheme Medical card or GP visit card Eye Checks Foot checks Other Entitlements that may be applicable Carer’s allowance Entitlements around Employment/ Education Employment Entitlements for Diabetes Management Long Term Illness Scheme Everyone with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, regardless of income/circumstances is entitled to a Long term illness (LTI) book. All people with diabetes are entitled to receive their diabetes medications, pens/syringes lancets, blood glucose monitoring strips free of charge. You will also be able to receive medications for associated conditions such as cholesterol lowering and blood pressure medication, if prescribed. Speak to a member of your doctor, nurse or pharmacist and request a form for completion. Any supplies/medications are available free once the application is approved. Payments you make prior to approval will not be reimbursed. You can have a medical card and long term illness book. Since July 1st 2013, gestational diabetes is no longer a condition eligible for the LTI scheme because under the legal requirement for an LTI, it is not viewed as a lifelong condition. Medical card or GP visit card You Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes And Social Security Disability

Diabetes is a life-threatening condition that affects almost 30 million Americans, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) reported. The number of cases of diabetes has been rising steadily over the years, causing almost 70,000 deaths in 2010 and contributing to about 230,000 more. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with diabetes, there is help available. The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers financial benefits for those struggling to work due to a disabling disease. The Financial Costs of Diabetes Diabetes is an expensive condition, costing individuals more than twice as much in healthcare costs than their healthy counterparts. ADA reports that those suffering from the condition will pay an extra $7,900 each year in hospital care, prescriptions, supplies, doctor’s visits and other direct medical expenses. In addition to direct medical costs, diabetes caused $69 billion dollars in indirect costs, which include missed workdays, decreased productivity at work, and the inability to work. This means, on average, those with diabetes are also losing almost $2,500 per year. Diabetes Self-Management pointed out that many with diabetes have trouble affording the necessary prescriptions and supplies, even with the help of insurance. Though some pharmaceutical companies offer assistance for those who can’t afford to pay full prices, people with diabetes are two and a half more times likely to be unemployed or live in poverty. There are three types of diabetes. Type 1 or juvenile, is often diagnosed in children or young adults, and happens when their bodies can’t make enough insulin. Type 2 or adult onset, is usually caused by unhealthy lifestyles, and happens when their bodies can’t use insulin correctly. The third, gestational diabetes, occurs during pregn Continue reading >>

Will I Qualify For Veteran’s Disability Benefits If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Will I Qualify For Veteran’s Disability Benefits If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and believe that your condition was caused by or made worse by your service in the military, you could be eligible for veterans’ disability benefits. In fiscal year 2015 (the most recent year for which statistics are available), diabetes was the 9th most common disability among all veterans’ disability recipients. In that year, 431,166 veterans received benefits because of their type 2 diabetes. How They Qualified There is more than one way to qualify for veterans’ disability benefits if you have type 2 diabetes. Specifically, you may qualify for benefits if: You can prove that your diabetes was caused by your active duty in the military or by a condition that you suffered because of your active duty in the military. You served in Vietnam between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975. If you set foot on soil in Vietnam, the Department of Veterans Affairs presumes that you were exposed to Agent Orange, a toxic herbicide used during the Vietnam War that medical professionals have connected to a variety of illnesses, including type 2 diabetes. Vietnam veterans who can prove that they were not dishonorably discharged and that they have type 2 diabetes may qualify for disability compensation. When you apply for benefits, it is important to describe all of the conditions associated with your type 2 diabetes. For example, you should make sure that information about all related conditions is included with your applications, including: Vision problems Heart problems Stomach, gallbladder, or kidney problems Any other health impairments Don’t assume that you will get benefits simply because you are a veteran with type 2 diabetes. Instead, make sure that the Department of Veterans Affairs has all of the information it needs to make Continue reading >>

Disability Tax Credit For Diabetes

Disability Tax Credit For Diabetes

It’s estimated that 285 million people in the world are affected by some form of diabetes. It’s also estimated that seven million new cases of diabetes will develop worldwide each year. For this, the Canadian government offers support through the Disability Tax Credit for Diabetes. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that, today, more than nine million Canadians live with diabetes or pre-diabetes, with 10 percent suffering from Type I Diabetes, and the number of people diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes increasing at a dramatic rate. What is Diabetes? Diabetes is a chronic condition. It stems from the body being unable to produce or properly use insulin in sufficient amounts. The body uses insulin to break down sugars. Sugar is used as an energy source in our bodies. Diabetes can lead to serious complications including: Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure High Cholesterol Vision Loss Kidney Failure Amputations of the legs and feet Premature Death The Most Common Forms of Diabetes are: Type 1 Diabetes accounts for about 5 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 1 usually occurs in adolescents and children, but it can occur at any age. In Type 1 diabetes, the body no longer produces insulin and the patient must take daily insulin injections or use an insulin pump. Type 2 Diabetes accounts for about 95 percent of adult diabetes. Healthy eating and regular exercise in combination with oral medication can help control or prevent health complications. Gestational Diabetes develops during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for both mother and fetus, as well as lead to Type 2 Diabetes developing later on in the mother. Facts about the Rising Incidence of Type 2 Diabetes: There are a number of factors leading to the alarming increase in in Continue reading >>

Can I Qualify For Disability Benefits With Diabetes?

Can I Qualify For Disability Benefits With Diabetes?

Diabetes can be a debilitating disease that can also cause or contribute to a number of related conditions. Many people think that diabetes is not the type of sickness or impairment that Social Security Disability would cover. Fortunately, Social Security Disability (SSD) can, in certain situations, provide cash benefits for those with a severe condition. However to be approved for SSD benefits one must apply through the Social Security Administration and satisfy all requirements and the 5-step determination process. What do I need to qualify for SSD Benefits with Diabetes? Before you even reach the 5-step disability determination process as employed by the SSA, you must first show that you have a sufficient work history. A sufficient work history is required because the SSD program is an insurance program that pays cash benefits to workers who become disabled and unable to work. A sufficient work history consists of both adequate recent work and work history. In 2014, one credit may be earned for each $1,2000 in wages or earnings — up to 4 credits. Generally speaking the greater the age at which you become disabled, the greater the number of work credits that are required. For instance, a 50 year-old-worker would need 28 work credits while a 60 year-old would need 38 work credits to qualify. The 5-Step Determination Process and Diabetes If you have satisfied SSD’s work requirements, you must still be able to satisfy the 5-step process the SSA uses to determine if you have a qualifying disability. At the first step of the process the disability claims examiner or administrative law judge will determine if you are currently working. The arbiter looks to your substantial gainful activity (SGA), the amount of money you earn or are able to work for, to determine if you Continue reading >>

Money Matters

Money Matters

Money is often a problem, whether you're a student or have just started a job (people rarely start on decent salaries). You'll want to economise, but don't sacrifice your health for the sake of a slightly bigger bulge in your wallet. It's one thing you can't afford to do if you have diabetes. Life on a shoestring One big weekly shop at your supermarket will work out cheaper than lots of single trips to the local shops over the week.One big weekly shop at your supermarket will work out cheaper than lots of single trips to the local shops over the week. Bread, cereals, pasta and potatoes are relatively cheap and filling.Bread, cereals, pasta and potatoes are relatively cheap and filling. Look out for supermarket ‘own brands’ and in-house specials.Look out for supermarket ‘own brands’ and in-house specials. Some supermarkets sell produce at reduced prices near the end of the day (but always check the sell-by date).Some supermarkets sell produce at reduced prices near the end of the day (but always check the sell-by date). Market stalls are cheaper for fish, eggs, fruit and veg.Market stalls are cheaper for fish, eggs, fruit and veg. Buy some foods in bulk, such as pasta, potatoes, rice, dried beans and pulses.Buy some foods in bulk, such as pasta, potatoes, rice, dried beans and pulses. Frozen veg and tinned fruit are useful if you find fresh ones go off before you use them.Frozen veg and tinned fruit are useful if you find fresh ones go off before you use them. Beans and pulses are cheap, filling and as nutritious as meat or fish – they take more imagination to cook with, but it's worth it.Beans and pulses are cheap, filling and as nutritious as meat or fish – they take more imagination to cook with, but it's worth it. On prescription People with Type 1 diabet Continue reading >>

Making A Living With Diabetes: Disability

Making A Living With Diabetes: Disability

Working a job with diabetes can be tough, sometimes impossible. If you run out of work options, you may qualify for disability pay. Here are some things to consider. The Social Security Administration (SSA) has two disability programs: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). SSDI is insurance most workers pay into through payroll taxes. Depending on how much you’ve paid into it, your monthly payments might range from about $700 to about $1,700 per month. SSI is not insurance. It’s a need-based program for people who haven’t paid payroll taxes. SSI maxes out at about $730 per month for an eligible person and $1,100 per month for an eligible person with an eligible spouse. Here’s a calculator that will give a very rough estimate how much you might get on SSDI. There are also private disability insurance plans you can buy into, or your employer may provide. Having one could make your life much easier, if you qualify as disabled. Should you consider disability? Nobody wants to go on disability. Work is too important a part of most people’s lives. Some people may feel they will be freeloading if they receive disability benefits. People will say you’re not contributing. I reject those thoughts totally. I relied on SSDI for 15 years, since I could no longer work as a nurse. I have always regarded it as government paying me to do good things. I write books and health articles; I volunteer. I take care of myself and try to be of service. Like most people on disability, I spent all the payments on necessities, helping keep the economy going. Being disabled might be embarrassing, but it can be lifesaving. A Forbes magazine piece quoted one woman with lung disease. “Emotionally, going on disability insurance was a Godsend, k Continue reading >>

Diabetes Disability Insurance Claim Help And Information

Diabetes Disability Insurance Claim Help And Information

An estimated 24 million children and adults in the United States, and 240 million people worldwide, have diabetes. Most people with diabetes can manage it by taking medication and carefully monitoring what they eat. In some cases, though, diabetes can lead to debilitating illnesses, injuries and disabilities that prevent you from maintaining a consistent work schedule. In most long term disability cases diabetes is associated with additional medical illnesses which prevent a person from being able to work. Our disability insurance lawyers have represented numerous claimants with uncontrolled diabetes. Disability insurance companies are quick to argue that diabetes disability claims should only be short term and not long term disability claims. Another argument is that the claimant has been working with diabetes for years so why now do they claim they cannot work. We help our clients deal with these unreasonable insurance company arguments on a daily basis. If you suspect that a diabetes complication will prevent you from working a consistent job, or if your provider already denied your individual claim or group policy claim, contact our office. We can help you fill out the application for benefits or appeal a denial. I Have Diabetes… Do I Qualify for Disability Insurance Benefits? Diabetes by itself will likely not qualify you for disability benefits unless it is uncontrolled. Your disability company will want to see a lot of evidence that you are incapable of providing a continuous work schedule. If your diabetes progresses to the point where you can no longer perform your job functions or similar job functions, then you will likely qualifying for disability insurance benefits. We will work closely with your doctors to properly documents your claim for benefits. Cont Continue reading >>

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