diabetestalk.net

Can You Black Out With Diabetes?

Blackouts | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Blackouts | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Since early June this year I have been in and out of hospital about 6 times. The last two times were due to allergic reactions to insulin; however the others were due to (what I'm calling) blackouts. I have no memory of these episodes, my husband finds me as though I'm asleep but when he tries to wake me I am totally non-responsive. When he opens my eyes they do, however, respond to the light. He has shaken me, splashed my face with cold water, tapped my face to try and bring me round and none of it does anything. When I am finally able to hold my eyes open of my own accord he says they are slightly glazed, very unfocused and I am unable to speak. I do make sounds in my throat but cannot seem able to form proper words or acknowledge anything that's being said to me. Along with this I have palpitations/racing heart (the first time this happened the paramedic said my heart was barreling along to the point where that alone would have been enough to land me in A&E) and tightness in my chest which makes it hard to breathe; especially when trying to take a deep breath (such as yawning). I had another one of these episodes last night. The last thing I remember is hubby telling me to go and lie down while he had a shower as I was exhausted. He found me and thought I was asleep until he couldn't wake me up. It took him quite a while to get me to a point where I was able to hold my eyes open and focus a little better and once I was completely fine we had dinner and that was that. I decided to see if I could get some idea of why this was happening and called my GP earlier today. I explained everything and told him that the hospital doctors had just passed it off Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Cause Blackouts? | Yahoo Answers

Does Diabetes Cause Blackouts? | Yahoo Answers

my friend has diabetes.she was acting like a drunk one day.when she came around-she couldn't remember anything.as if she blackedout during that time.is that normal in diabetics? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: That can happen, but it's not "normal". That means either hypo or hyperglycemia; and the symptoms are pretty similar so it's impossible to know by just "look"; a diabetic who is not under control should have their kit with them at all times. And if you've seen this happen before and you're with her alot, it wouldn't be a bad idea to have her teach you how to test her, or inject insulin (and how much) in case. Or if she constantly suffers from hypoglycemia, how to use a glucagon shot. But if you ever see her in a position of extreme confusion, "drunkeness" or if she passes out, call 911 IMMEDIATELY. Source(s): Two Weeks Diabetes Cure - Source(s): Two Weeks Diabetes Cure : I m a diabetic and blackouts don t typically occur when you re hyperglycemic (high blood sugar). At least, in my twelve years of being diabetic, I ve never had a blackout from hyperglycemia. Blackouts occur when you re hypoglycemic, which is far more dangerous because the brain needs sugar to function, and when your sugar gets too low it literally stops functioning. I ve had episodes where I ve lost about two hours of time because my sugar had dropped to critically low levels. Having your diabetic kit wouldn t help this whatsoever, because it isn t caused from a lack of insulin. If someone that is diabetic is in a blackout state that s because they need to eat a simple carb (like glucose), and they need to do it very quickly. I am writing to tell you what an incredible impact these methods had on my life! I have had type 2 diabetes for 27 years. For me, the worst part of Continue reading >>

Is It Very Severe To Have A Blackout For Hours | Diabetic Connect

Is It Very Severe To Have A Blackout For Hours | Diabetic Connect

You say he doesn't remember leaving the bar. I don't mean to insinuate anything here but was he drinking? Diabetes and alcohol aren't always good friends. The liver is trying so hard to rid itself of the alcohol that it doesn't send out glucose to stabilize the blood sugar thus causing a low which could lead to the black outs you describe. I knew a woman years ago that refused to give up drinking and ended up in a rescue squad every weekend because of it. If he's drinking heavily or even moderately this could be the cause of his black outs. Just a thought as this jogged my memory of the woman I knew years ago. Continue reading >>

Blackouts (memory Time Loss), Confusion, Difficulty Concentrating And Difficulty Finding Words

Blackouts (memory Time Loss), Confusion, Difficulty Concentrating And Difficulty Finding Words

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms blackouts (memory time loss), confusion, difficulty concentrating and difficulty finding words including Medication reaction or side-effect, Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), and Stroke. There are 65 conditions associated with blackouts (memory time loss), confusion, difficulty concentrating and difficulty finding words. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Low blood sugar, or low glucose levels, causes shakiness, anxiety, clammy skin, irritability, hunger, and more. Stroke A stroke occurs when blood and oxygen to the brain are cut off, and causes numbness, confusion, and more. Alzheimer's disease Alzheimer's disease is type of dementia that causes memory loss, as well as thinking and behavior problems. Aspirin poisoning Aspirin poisoning is a medical emergency and can cause nausea, vomiting, drowsiness and more. Transient global amnesia Transient global amnesia is a sudden loss of memory. Symptoms usually last for hours and then memory returns. Intoxication Symptoms of intoxication include euphoria, slowed reaction time, dizziness, confusion, numbness, and more. Dementia with Lewy bodies Dementia with Lewy bodies is a brain disorder that causes problems managing memory and movement. Hypothyroidism (adult) Hypothyroidism your body functions slow down, making you gain weight and feel tired all the time. Head injury Symptoms of a hea Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

Why You Shouldn't Drive With Low Blood Sugar

Why You Shouldn't Drive With Low Blood Sugar

Most people know that driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs is dangerous, but driving with low blood sugar, also called hypoglycemia, is also very dangerous. People with diabetes who drive at the wrong time can black out behind the wheel and injure or kill another person — or themselves. Still, results released in April 2011 by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists from an online survey of more than 2500 Americans with type 2 diabetes found that about 19 percent had experienced hypoglycemia while driving. “If something happens and they pull your blood sugar records and find out that you didn’t check before you drove, you can lose your license. I have seen some patients have their license taken away and it is very difficult to get it back,” warns Amy Kranick, RD, a certified diabetes educator with the adult diabetes program at Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, Tennessee. When Blood Sugar Dips Having hypoglycemia means that your blood sugar levels have fallen too low to support the needs of your body and brain. This is usually defined as less than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). This dip in blood sugar is a possible side effect of some kinds of type 2 diabetes medication. Symptoms of low blood sugar include: Headache Dizziness Sweating Hunger Tremors or trembling Pale skin Anxiety Confusion Changes in behavior or mood Clumsiness Difficulty paying attention Seizures Loss of consciousness Most people are aware of having low blood sugar and report that it is not a pleasant experience. But a few people with diabetes have “hypoglycemia unawareness” and don’t feel any symptoms until it's too late. This is why it's important to check your blood sugar before you take the wheel, just in case your numbers are going down Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Causes Of Blackouts

Diabetes-related Causes Of Blackouts

Our information shows that 3causes of Blackouts are related to diabetes, or a family history of diabetes (from a list of 38total causes).These diseases and conditions may be more likely causes of Blackouts if the patient has diabetes,is at risk of diabetes, or has a family history of diabetes. The following drugs, medications, substances or toxins may possibly cause Blackouts as a side effect. [ See detailed list of 7drug side effect causes of Blackouts ] Conditions listing medical symptoms: Blackouts: The following list of conditionshave ' Blackouts ' or similarlisted as a symptom in our database.This computer-generated list may be inaccurate or incomplete.Always seek prompt professional medical advice about the causeof any symptom. Select from the following alphabetical view of conditions whichinclude a symptom of Blackouts or choose View All. Conditions listing medical complications: Blackouts: The following list of medical conditions have ' Blackouts ' or similar listed as a medical complication in our database. By using this site you agree to our Terms of Use . Information provided on this site is for informational purposes only; it is not intended as a substitute for advice from your own medical team. The information on this site is not to be used for diagnosing or treating any health concerns you may have - please contact your physician or health care professional for all your medical needs. Please see our Terms of Use . Continue reading >>

Low Sugar Blackout

Low Sugar Blackout

New Member T1 since May 5, 2007, MM722 pump since 2/08 This is the second time this type of situation has happened to me and I'm curious if it has happened to anyone else and what steps I can take to prevent this in the future. I do not recall doing any of this and it is all based on what my boyfriend witnessed. This morning I woke up acting "strange" and a little hyper. I walked out into my front yard and stood there in the sprinklers for about 5 minutes before my BF got me and realized I was acting this way because I was low. He grabbed me 2 capri suns (my sugar riser) and I decided to have a juice war against my BF and sister inside my house with them. Apparently I was not willing to sit still or let him test my sugar. By the time I "came to" and realized what was happening I was embarassed and completely clueless as to the events that just happened. I am pretty good about waking up in the middle of the night/morning if I am low, but how dangerous is it if I can't even remember about a half hour after waking up? It's like tripping some heavy duty drugs. I haven't had ones like you described in years, but they are quite humiliating. When you steal pleasure in any form--either by sneaking food or believing you don't deserve it--you become a thief of your own desires. You live your life believing that the only way to get what you want is to steal it. - Geneen Roth Member T1 Since 1998, Currently MDI, Going on Animas 2020 Even with great control, it can happen. With me it's happened twice in 11 years, and I agree it can be very scary. Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy Since you are a T1 and using the pump, have you considered changing your insulin dose for through the night? Almost all the Ds that have posted about extreme lows have described acti Continue reading >>

Hypo Black Outs - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Hypo Black Outs - Type 1 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. This morning I experienced for the first time a hypo which made me black out. I was driving at the time & crashed the car into the central reservation, fortunately no other vehicles were involved. Think I'm still in shock. Just cuts & bruises & a total wreck of a car. How can I stop this from happening again? It's wierd as I'd eaten a big breakfast so why did the hypo come on? Was it a hypo? I hope you are ok. I suppose the only way to know if it was a hypo would have been to test. Do you normally feel hypo's coming on? Could you simply have fallen asleep? I guess you would have been shakey when you woke up whether you were hypo or not but did you have any other symptoms after waking up? Did the crash wake you or did you wake to find yourself in a crashed car? I would certainly recomend switching to Lantus. It's so much easier to control. This morning I experienced for the first time a hypo which made me black out. I was driving at the time & crashed the car into the central reservation, fortunately no other vehicles were involved. Think I'm still in shock. Just cuts & bruises & a total wreck of a car. How can I stop this from happening again? It's wierd as I'd eaten a big breakfast so why did the hypo come on? Was it a hypo? wow i hope your ok,,, didnt you feel kind of different before this happened?? everytime i feel weird i pull over. but judging by what happened it doesnt sound like you had a warning at all...wow that freaks me out now. im so sorry about what happened to you I am truly sorry to hear that happened. Do NOT let it rattle you - I know where you are coming from. I had one expe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Alcohol Blackouts

Diabetes And Alcohol Blackouts

Is Alcohol Off-Limits? There are plenty of reasons to avoid drinking alcohol, starting with the obvious: inebriation and addiction. But assuming youre a responsible drinker is there room for alcohol in your diet if you have diabetes? Most experts agree that the answer is a qualified yes. Alcohol may even have some benefits in terms of preventing cardiovascular problems associated with diabetes. A Harvard study published in the Archives of Internal Medicine in early 2002 found that women who have a few alcoholic drinks over the course of a week stand an almost 15 percent lower chance of developing high blood pressure than nondrinking women. Other studies in both men and women have shown that alcohol raises HDL (good) cholesterol and thins the blood slightly, protecting against the formation of clots that can cause a heart attack or stroke. There are a number of caveats. In the recent Harvard study, women who had more than about 1 drinks a day had a 30 percent higher risk of elevated blood pressure than non-drinkers did. Furthermore, alcohol impacts people with diabetes more significantly than non-diabetics. The main threat is hypoglycemia. Alcohol is processed in the liver which also stores and releases glucose. Result: Wine, beer and spirits hinder the livers ability to release glucose, which can lead to hypoglycemia as much as a day after you drink. Moreover, symptoms of hypoglycemia mimic those of inebriation, making the danger harder to spot. Another consideration is that alcoholic drinks have seven calories per gramalmost as much as fatbut provide no nutrition, making them a poor choice if youre trying to lose weight. And if youre taking medication, alcohol may be out of the question. Should you drink? Talk it over with your doctor or dietitian. If you get the okay Continue reading >>

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Diabetic Hypoglycemia

Print Overview For people with diabetes, low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when there's too much insulin and not enough sugar (glucose) in the blood. Hypoglycemia is defined as blood sugar below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Several factors can cause hypoglycemia in people with diabetes, including taking too much insulin or other diabetes medications, skipping a meal, or exercising harder than usual. Pay attention to early warning signs, so you can treat low blood sugar promptly. Treatment involves short-term solutions — such as taking glucose tablets — to raise your blood sugar into a normal range. Untreated, diabetic hypoglycemia can lead to seizures and loss of consciousness — a medical emergency. Rarely, it can be deadly. Tell family and friends what symptoms to look for and what to do in case you're not able to treat the condition yourself. Symptoms Early warning signs and symptoms Early signs and symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia include: Shakiness Dizziness Sweating Hunger Irritability or moodiness Anxiety or nervousness Headache Nighttime symptoms Diabetic hypoglycemia can also occur while you sleep. Signs and symptoms, which can awaken you, include: Damp sheets or bedclothes due to perspiration Nightmares Tiredness, irritability or confusion upon waking Severe symptoms If diabetic hypoglycemia goes untreated, signs and symptoms of severe hypoglycemia can occur. These include: Clumsiness or jerky movements Muscle weakness Difficulty speaking or slurred speech Blurry or double vision Drowsiness Confusion Convulsions or seizures Unconsciousness Death Take your symptoms seriously. Diabetic hypoglycemia can increase the risk of serious — even deadly — accidents. Identifying and correcting the factors contrib Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

Insulin Shock: Warning Signs And Treatment Options

What is insulin shock? After taking an insulin shot, a person with diabetes might on occasion forget to eat (or eat less than they normally do). If this happens, they may end up with too much insulin in their blood. This, in turn, can lead to hypoglycemia, also called low blood sugar. A serious condition called insulin shock may occur if a person: ignores mild hypoglycemia takes too much insulin by mistake misses a meal completely does excessive unusual exercise without changing their carbohydrate intake Insulin shock is a diabetic emergency. It involves symptoms that, if left untreated, can lead to diabetic coma, brain damage, and even death. How insulin works When we consume food or beverages that contain carbohydrates, the body converts them into glucose. Glucose is a type of sugar that fuels the body, giving it the energy it needs to perform everyday functions. Insulin is a hormone that works like a key. It opens the door in the body’s cells so they can absorb glucose and use it as fuel. People with diabetes may lack enough insulin or have cells that aren’t able to use insulin as they should. If the cells of the body aren’t able to absorb the glucose properly, it causes excess glucose in blood. This is called high blood glucose, which is linked with a number of health issues. High blood glucose can cause eye and foot problems, heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, and nerve damage. Insulin shots help people with diabetes use glucose more efficiently. Taking an insulin shot before eating helps the body absorb and use glucose from the food. The result is a more balanced and healthy blood sugar level. Usually, it works great. Sometimes, however, things go wrong. What causes insulin shock? Having too much insulin in your blood can lead to having too little gluco Continue reading >>

What Is A Diabetic Blackout And Why Does It Happen?

What Is A Diabetic Blackout And Why Does It Happen?

What is a diabetic blackout and why does it happen? Diabetes mellitus, or simply, diabetes, is a disease that damages the body when the blood glucose (sugar) is allowed to remain too high for too many years. There are several major types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is the form that used to be called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. It starts most often in childhood. The patient has an absolute need for the hormone insulin, since his pancreas, the organ that makes insulin, can no longer do so. The insulin is usually given by injection and must be balanced by food intake in order to keep the blood glucose as normal as possible. Type 2 diabetes is the form that used to be called adult-onset diabetes. It is a lifestyle disease, resulting from excessive weight gain and lack of exercise. The patient does not lack insulin, but has insensitivity to his own bodys insulin. Treatment is started with diet and exercise but may ultimately require pills or insulin. Gestational diabetes is the form that occurs in pregnancy when the hormones of pregnancy overwhelm the bodys insulin so that the blood glucose rises. It can cause problems with the growing fetus who tends to grow large and have a difficult delivery. Gestational diabetes can also become type 2 diabetes later in life. The diagnosis of all types of diabetes is made when the blood glucose in the overnight fasting state is 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) or higher on more than one occasion. The diagnosis may also be made if the blood glucose after eating rises to 200 mg/dl or higher on more than one occasion. Recently the finding of a level of 6.5 percent or greater in a blood test called a hemoglobin A1c has been added to the recommended way of making a diagnosis of diabetes mellitus. The different types Continue reading >>

Diabetic Fainting - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Diabetic Fainting - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

I was diagnosed with Type 1 at the age of 50 (with a GC of 1250.) For five years previous to my diagnosis, I suffered blackouts (several each year). My endo thinks that the blackouts are different from the diabetes. This may be true because I never expereinced any of the given diabetes warning signs. There was never any increased urination. Never any increased thirst! Etc. What is the comment? Can Type 1 diabetic fainting happen (in adults) without the warning signs? We are volunteers here & not medical professionals.We do have a lot of experience with Type 1, however. I have read that in the years leading up to a diagnosis of diabetes, some individuals experience the condition of hypoglycemia.Some folks have chronic hypoglycemia, in which their bodies respond to glucose with an oversupply of insulin.In others, this condition seems to be present for a while before diabetes develops.I visualize that as a time period in which the beta cells are under duress and are spurting & sputtering along, a bit out of whack. While it may be interesting to know precisely what was going on during those years, it's terrific that you've achieved good enough control to not experience blackouts with diabetes.Blackouts can occur 'without warning' if we are not aware of our own signals for falling blood sugar, or if we have lost the ability to sense when our blood sugar is falling. Continue reading >>

More in diabetes