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Can You Beat Type 1 Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? - Topic Overview

Type 2 Diabetes: Can You Cure It? - Topic Overview

Can you "reverse" type 2 diabetes? Can you cure it? Diabetes can go into remission. When diabetes is in remission, you have no signs or symptoms of it. But your risk of relapse is higher than normal.1 That's why you make the same daily healthy choices that you do for active type 2 diabetes. There is no known cure for type 2 diabetes. But it can be controlled. And in some cases, it goes into remission. For some people, a diabetes-healthy lifestyle is enough to control their blood sugar levels. That means losing weight if you are overweight, eating healthy foods, and being more active. But most people with type 2 diabetes also need to take one or more medicines or insulin. Of those people who don't need diabetes medicine, some find that their diabetes does "reverse" with weight control, diabetes-healthy eating, and exercise. Their bodies are still able to make and use insulin, and their blood sugar levels go back to normal. Their diabetes is in remission. "Complete remission" is 1 year or more of normal A1c and fasting glucose levels without using diabetes medicine. When you have complete remission, you still get tested for high blood sugar, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and kidney and eye problems. You do regular foot checks.1 "Prolonged remission" is 5 years or more of normal A1c and blood sugar levels without using diabetes medicine. You might have lab tests less often. But your doctor will still check on any heart, eye, foot, or other health problems you have had from diabetes, even if they are better than before.1 Remission is most likely in the early stage of diabetes or after a big weight loss. It can also happen after bariatric surgery for weight loss, which can trigger healthy changes in the body's insulin system. Remission is less likely in the later st Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Be Cured? A Review Of Therapies And Lifestyle Changes

Can Diabetes Be Cured? A Review Of Therapies And Lifestyle Changes

Diabetes is a condition that affects blood sugar levels and causes many serious health problems if not managed well. The health impacts of diabetes can be limited, but can it ever be "cured"? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that develops when the body destroys the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. This means people with type 1 diabetes do not make insulin. In those with type 2 diabetes, there is a decreased sensitivity to insulin and the body does not make or use as much insulin as it needs. Type 2 diabetes is much more common than type 1 diabetes. This article reviews therapies and lifestyle changes that can help reduce the effects of diabetes on a person's health. It also explores whether these treatments can help "cure" diabetes, or if they are simply helpful ways to manage the condition. Contents of this article: Is diabetes curable? Medically speaking, there is no cure for diabetes but it can go into "remission." Diabetes in remission simply means the body does not show any signs of diabetes. However, the disease is technically still there. According to Diabetes Care, remission can take different forms: Partial remission: When a person has had a blood glucose level lower than that of a person with diabetes for at least 1 year without any diabetes medication. Complete remission: When the blood glucose level returns to normal, not simply pre-diabetic levels, for at least 1 year without any medications. Prolonged remission: When complete remission lasts for at least 5 years. Even if a person has had normal blood sugar levels for 20 years, their diabetes is still considered to be in remission rather than "cured." There is no known cure for diabetes. The good news is that remission is possible in many cases and can be as simple as making some lifestyl Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

Type 1 Diabetes - Symptoms, Causes, Treatment

With the right tools and support, you can do anything. Whether you've been newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, are helping a loved one or have been managing your condition for a while, help is here. No matter how type 1 diabetes has shown up in your life, you can find success by balancing your medications, and sticking to your daily exercise routine and nutrition plan. But wherever youre at with this challenge, you can always reach out for help of any kindfrom your caregivers, your family, or other people who live with type 1 diabetes. Stress is natural part of fighting type 1 diabetes, so if youre experiencing unusual stress, depression, or anxiety of any kind, know that youre not alone. A heightened risk for mental health challenges comes hand in hand with all of the physical challenges, so know that its not your faultand there are plenty of resources and support to help you along the way. Knowing what to eat with type 1 diabetes can be tough. You need a strategy for balancing food, insulin doses, and physical activity to maintain your blood sugar levels. Learning how different foods affect your blood sugar and figuring out how to balance that within your daily routine is key. And remember, it can be a little bit of trial and error. Experiment with different foods and watch your blood sugar as daily activities change. You can also work with a dietician to build a personalized nutrition plan that works for you. The Type 1 Diabetes Self-Care Manual can help you navigate any challenge with confidence. The manual covers everything, from blood sugar goals to complications and special considerations by age. Everyone manages their diabetes in different ways. But the key to finding the right way to manage type 1 diabetes lies in working with your healthcare providers to di Continue reading >>

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Introduction To Type I Diabetes

Three Articles On Type I Diabetes: Article #1: Introduction to Type I Diabetes (This Article) Article #2: Possible Causes of Type I Diabetes Article #3: The Treatment of Type I Diabetes Introduction to Type I Diabetes Did you know that there are two products that have cured advanced Type I diabetes cases? Both of them will be discussed in this article. But more importantly, one of these products can reverse cumulative severe side-effects of Type I or Type 2 diabetes. Type I diabetes is actually a set of symptoms, meaning it can be caused by several different things. The symptoms are that the blood lacks insulin. There are actually several things that can cause an abnormally low level of insulin in the blood. Type I diabetes is a very severe disease. The average lifespan of Type I diabetic is 5-8 years shorter than an average person. But death is not the worst thing about Type I diabetes. Here is a list of some of the health problems it can lead to: Amputation of limbs Blindness (retinopathy) – diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in America — 12,000 to 24,000 case annually Kidney failure (nephropathy) – frequently leading to dialysis or a kidney/pancreas transplant Liver disease Arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) Heart disease Stroke (e.g. paralysis) High blood pressure Nerve damage (neuropathy) Dementia Urinary tract infection (mostly in women) Depression – Note: Aspartame (e.g. Equal, NutraSweet, etc.) and sugar are the leading causes of depression in non-diabetics. However, because the average diabetic consumes more aspartame than the average person, it is highly possible that aspartame is by far the REAL cause of depression in diabetics!! A diabetic should absolutely avoid aspartame and all other artificial sweeteners! Bone quali Continue reading >>

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Caroline’s Story: Overcoming Type 1 Diabetes With Real Food

Today, Caroline Potter from Colorful Eats, has an amazing story of recovery for you. She’s worked with the same nutritionist that I have these last few years, and has been able to treat Type 1 diabetes with a nutrient-dense diet and natural supplements. It’s another encouraging story of how food can play a significant role in our fight against disease! Treating Diabetes with Real Food Life in your 20s seems pretty grand. You feel powerful, youthful and energized. Dreams seem within your reach and challenges seem conquerable. Then out of the blue, college bliss turns into doctors offices and waiting rooms. Countless tests of all forms, vague results and no answers as to what was wrong with me. As I came home from college that winter for Christmas break, I laid on the couch for most of my vacation. I was constantly starving, eating everything in sight but quickly loosing weight. Finally, one day while out to dinner with my family, I broke down in tears because my mouth was so dry, I could barely talk. I was experiencing dry mouth, one of the major symptoms of diabetes. Diabetes? I was 20, a seemingly healthy young girl, who grew up in a home where my mother fed us all organic food. I was the one in school with her carrot sticks and tuna salad sandwiches. I never drank soda or ate Oreos, so the thought of diabetes was never even on my radar. Barely able to walk up a flight of stairs, I checked myself into the ER to discover my blood sugar levels were in a diabetic coma range. Later the next morning, the doctor diagnosed me with type 1 diabetes. I was scared, hopeless and confused. The days that followed were difficult to say the least. I still felt sick all the time, gained over 20 pounds in 2 weeks and felt terribly alone. My legs turned black and blue from giving mys Continue reading >>

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

People With Type 1 Diabetes Are Living Longer

Better blood sugar control may be the key to longer survival Ninety years ago, type 1 diabetes was a death sentence: half of people who developed it died within two years; more than 90% were dead within five years. Thanks to the introduction of insulin therapy in 1922, and numerous advances since then, many people with type 1 diabetes now live into their 50s and beyond. But survival in this group still falls short of that among people without diabetes. A Scottish study published this week in JAMA shows that at the age of 20, individuals with type 1 diabetes on average lived 12 fewer years than 20-year-olds without it. A second study in the same issue of JAMA showed that people with type 1 diabetes with better blood sugar control lived longer than those with poorer blood sugar control. Types of diabetes There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. The immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys cells in the pancreas that make insulin. This usually happens before age 20. Insulin is needed to get blood sugar (glucose) into cells for energy. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the bloodstream. This damages cells and tissues throughout the body. People who develop type 1 diabetes need to take insulin via shots or a pump for life. Type 2 diabetes tends to occur later in life, usually among individuals who are overweight or inactive. It accounts for about 90% of all diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes often make enough insulin, at least at first, but their cells don’t respond to it. As with type 1 diabetes, glucose builds up in the bloodstream, damaging cells and tissues throughout the body. Type 2 diabetes is initially treated with lifestyle changes such as weight loss, more exercise, and a healthier diet. Medications that make the Continue reading >>

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

How To Beat Type 2 Diabetes With Diet And Lifestyle Changes

It's no secret that type 2 diabetes is on the rise in the United States and around the world. But if you've been diagnosed with diabetes, there's a lot you can do to improve your health — and the best place to start is likely by making some changes to your lifestyle. “Basic principles of good health like eating right, exercising regularly, and maintaining a healthy weight can be as effective as medicine in the management of type 2 diabetes for most people,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, lead medical nutrition therapist at Nebraska Medicine in Omaha. That's backed up by the Look AHEAD study, a large clinical trial funded by the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The researchers found that over a four-year period, changes like eating a healthier diet and getting more exercise led to weight loss and improved diabetes control in 5,000 overweight or obese participants with type 2 diabetes. A December 2016 review in Diabetologia similarly found through 28 studies that participants who were able to achieve about 150 minutes per week of moderate activity lowered their risk of type 2 diabetes by 26 percent compared with nonactive participants. If you're ready to make positive changes to help control diabetes, here's how to get started. Improve Your Diet to Help You Treat Type 2 Diabetes Naturally Keeping close tabs on your diet is a major way to help manage type 2 diabetes. A healthy diet for people with type 2 diabetes includes fresh or frozen fruit and vegetables, whole grains, beans, lean meats, and low-fat or fat-free dairy. Focus on eating fruit and non-starchy vegetables, like broccoli, carrots, and lettuce, and having smaller portions of starchy foods, meats, and dairy products. Be especially careful about loading Continue reading >>

How Immunotherapy Could Stop And Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

How Immunotherapy Could Stop And Prevent Type 1 Diabetes

How Immunotherapy Could Stop and Prevent Type 1 Diabetes Clara Rodrguez Fernndez - 17/01/2019 9 mins - Features People with type 1 diabetes need lifelong treatments of daily insulin injections to manage their condition that still leave them at risk of long-term complications. Immunotherapy could one day become an insulin-free alternative to stop, prevent, and potentially cure this chronic disease. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas are wrongly detected as foreign and destroyed by the immune system. There is no cure; once initiated, the disease will progress to complete destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, Pierre Vandepapelire, CEO of Imcyse, told me. This Belgian company is developing an innovative form of treatment that could change the way type 1 diabetes is treated. Currently, the standard treatment for the disease consists of monitoring glucose levels and frequent insulin injections to keep healthy blood sugar levels. However, even with the best control measures, patients are still at risk of complications affecting the eyes, kidneys and nerves in the long term. Insulin treatment also carries the risk of inducing episodes of extremely low blood sugar, also known as hypoglycemia, which can be life-threatening. There is currently research focusing on automating the process of measuring glucose and injecting the right amount of insulin through a so-called artificial pancreas. That solution is still not ideal, though. You would still be dependent on insulin and glucose measurement, and even the best closed loops would come with a risk of hypoglycemia, said Jacob Sten Petersen, Corporate Vice President and Head of Stem Cell R&D at Novo Nordisk. As a leader in diabetes treatments, Novo No Continue reading >>

I Reversed My Diabetes In Just 11 Days - By Going On A Starvation Diet

I Reversed My Diabetes In Just 11 Days - By Going On A Starvation Diet

A family bereavement, high blood pressure, an unavoidable job change. I thought everything came in threes — but I was wrong. There was more bad news around the corner. I was a fit 59-year-old and had just had an annual health check at my GP surgery. This revealed I had high blood sugar — 9millimoles per litre, whereas a normal level is 4-6mmol/l — and my doctor suggested I could have diabetes. Further tests confirmed that, yes, I was type 2 diabetic. I was stunned. I have always been a healthy weight (I am 5ft 7in and just 10st 7lb), had no family history of diabetes, ate a healthy diet, never smoked, and I definitely did not have a sweet tooth. Determined to find a solution, I began researching the condition and how to beat it. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas does not produce enough insulin to keep glucose levels normal (in type 1, the pancreas stops producing insulin altogether), and if I didn’t take action, I would be 36 per cent more likely to die early and could suffer bad sight, poor kidneys, heart failure and strokes. I’d also eventually be on medication. My GP said that my diabetes was mild enough to be controlled through diet alone, and gave me a wad of leaflets on nutrition for diabetics. I took up salads, cut down on carbohydrates and ate my five-a-day — but progress was slow. Over seven months I shed a stone but my blood sugar was still too high — around 7mmol/l. Not satisfied with this, further internet research threw up a more drastic approach. Scientists at Newcastle University had devised a radical low-calorie diet that studies suggested could reverse diabetes in under eight weeks. This involved eating just 800 calories a day (a man’s recommended intake is 2,500) — 600 calories from meal replacement shakes and soups and 200 calories fr Continue reading >>

This Man Says A 'rare Gene' Cured His Type 1 Diabetes. Experts Are Skeptical.

This Man Says A 'rare Gene' Cured His Type 1 Diabetes. Experts Are Skeptical.

Type 1 diabetes, or diabetes mellitus, is an incurable disease that requires lifelong treatment. That is, unless you're Daniel Darkes. About eight years ago, Darkes said, doctors diagnosed him with type 1 diabetes : a potentially life-threatening condition in which the immune system kills off the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, the hormone necessary for transporting glucose, or sugar, into cells so they can produce energy. But early last year, routine finger-prick tests showed his blood-sugar levels were normal, so doctors advised him to stop his insulin injections, Darkes said. Now, his doctors have told him they're 80 percent sure he's cured, the Northampton Chronicle and Echo reported. If true, this would mean Darkes could be the first person ever to naturally experience complete remission of type 1 diabetes. [ 27 Oddest Medical Cases ] Darkes has become a celebrity within the diabetes community, particularly in the United Kingdom, and he was happy to talk with Live Science about his experience. Daniel Darkes is a 30-year-old army veteran and type 1 diabetic who said he no longer needs insulin. But does Darkes' story really mean type 1 diabetes can be cured? Darkes declined to provide his medical records, and the experts Live Science spoke to said there were several missing or confusing pieces of information in his story. Usually, incredible medical stories like this one are reported as case reports in the medical literature, the experts said. And even if the details of his story can ultimately be confirmed, the experts emphasized that it's extremely unlikely that Darkes' case would lead to a widespread cure for type 1 diabetes, as reports in the media have wrongly suggested . Darkes, who is 30 years old and an army veteran, lives in Northamptonshire, En Continue reading >>

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

I Have Type 1 – Diabetes What Can I Eat?

From the moment you are diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes you are likely to be faced with what seems like an endless list of new tasks that need to become part of everyday life – injections, testing, treating a hypo, monitoring and eating a healthy, balanced diet. No wonder it can all seem so daunting and overwhelming. One of your first questions is likely to be “what can I eat?” But, with so much to take in, you could still come away from appointments feeling unsure about the answer. Plus, there are lots of myths about diabetes and food that you will need to navigate too. If you’ve just been diagnosed and aren’t sure about what you can and can’t eat, here’s what you need to know. I've just been diagnosed with Type 1 – what can I eat? In one word... anything. It may come as a surprise, but all kinds of food are fine for people with Type 1 diabetes to eat. In the past, people were sent away after their diagnosis with a very restrictive diet plan. This was because the availability of insulin was limited and the type of insulin treatment was very restrictive. As insulin treatments have been developed to be much more flexible, the days of “do's and don'ts” are long gone. The way to go nowadays is to try and fit the diabetes and insulin around the same healthy, balanced diet that is recommended for everyone, with lots of fruit and veg and some food from all the food groups. Is there anything I should avoid? Before your diagnosis of diabetes, it is likely that you experienced an unquenchable thirst. It is a good idea to avoid sugary drinks and fruit juices as a way of quenching thirst. They usually put blood glucose levels up very high and very quickly – which is why they can be a useful treatment for a hypo (low blood glucose levels). Instead, drink water, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes No Match For Primal Lifestyle!

Type 1 Diabetes No Match For Primal Lifestyle!

Type 1 Diabetes No Match for Primal Lifestyle! Its Friday, everyone! And that means another Primal Blueprint Real Life Story from a Marks Daily Apple reader. If you have your own success story and would like to share it with me and the Marks Daily Apple community please contact me here . Ill continue to publish these each Friday as long as they keep coming in. Thank you for reading! My name is Shawn and I am 28 years old. I was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes about a year ago. I havent seen many stories or articles related to diabetes on the MDA website so I thought I would share how going Primal has helped me take back control over my health and wellbeing. First of all, I have actually been very healthy most of my life (or so I thought). In college I lifted weights, ran, and did pushups and sit-ups in my dorm room on a regular basis. I despised salad and fresh veggies, and loaded up on Hamburger Helper, cereal, and PB&J because it was convenient and I worked it all off during my workouts. I am 6 tall and my weight maxed out at about 205 lbs (92 kgs) during my last year of college (2007)perfectly healthy I thought. Fast forward several years (during which I managed to drop about 10 lbs thanks to army basic training) to September of 2011. I started losing weightlots of weightabout 25 lbs in 3 weeks to be exact, I drank water by the gallons, and I could no longer exercise without getting severe cramping in my legs. Something was obviously wrong, so I made an appointment with my doctor who I hadnt seen in about 10 years. I had a fasting blood sugar level of 350 ( normal is 70-99 mg/dL ). The last several months of 2011 were very challenging. There was no explanation why I got this disease (no family history) and trying to come to terms with the fact that I would have to de Continue reading >>

Reversal Of Type 1 Diabetes Using Plant-based Diet: A Case Study.

Reversal Of Type 1 Diabetes Using Plant-based Diet: A Case Study.

All submissions of the EM system will be redirected to Online Manuscript Submission System. Authors are requested to submit articles directly to Online Manuscript Submission System of respective journal. Case Report - Biomedical Research (2019) Volume 30, Issue 3 Reversal of type 1 diabetes using plant-based diet: A case study. Medical Nutritionist, Indo-Vietnam Medical Board, India Medical Nutritionist Indo-Vietnam Medical Board India Visit for more related articles at Biomedical Research Type-1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease characterized by hyperglycemia, inability to produce insulin due to self-destruction of beta cells in the pancreas. The epidemic of type-1 diabetes causes irreversible suffering like retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, foot complications, high blood pressure, etc, and put patients on a life sentence with insulin. The common perception in medical science is that sugar levels cannot be normalized without the help of medication. However, in the present study we examined a type 1 patient by putting her on a diet plan with regular follow ups and studied all diabetes-related biochemical parameters. We were successfully able to eliminate her medication and insulin dependency. Diabetes is one of the most common metabolic disordersassociated with many life-threatening complications whichmake the life of a diabetic person worse. Diabetes is of twotypes- type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is the morecommon type of diabetes worldwide (90-95%), marked by anincreased blood sugar level, frequent urination and weight loss.The other is type 1 or gestational diabetes (5-10%). In type 2diabetes, impaired receptors do not respond to insulin,eventually leading to insulin resistance while in type 1 there isa deficiency of insulin [ 1 ]. According to a re Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Type 1 Diabetes . . . Cured?

Carrie posted this wonderfully thought-provoking comment about her diabetic son: My 13 yr old son was diagnosed over a year ago with Type 1 [diabetes]. Before his diagnosis, I was very ‘green’ — bought organic foods, bought meat from free-range, grass-fed local farms, cleaned my house with products I made myself from vinegar and natural products. But we did follow the low-fat, low-calorie, high-fiber, healthy whole grain diet. We were told “eat whatever you want” — just dose for it [with insulin] and be healthy (yep: low-fat, high-fiber, etc.) I didn’t think so: If he has a carb problem, then limit carbs! We immediately went low-carb, causing us to remove a lot of wheat products, but didn’t know about the damages of gluten then. His last two A1Cs [hemoglobin A1c’s, a 60-90 day reflection of blood sugar fluctuations] have been 5.3% [normal range]. He was taken off his basal insulin and his bolus, continuing to less and less. Today, he is OFF insulin! YES, he is a Type 1 diabetic: They double-checked for the antibodies in case he was misdiagnosed–they are there. Even without insulin, his blood sugars are better than me or his dad, or even sister (we all check now). And all this while growing over 5 inches in one year, going through puberty and the stomach flu with no problems (scary for Type 1 diabetics). His doctors are amazed. We all still did not know how he was this way, until someone shared with me Wheat Belly. We are all going completely gluten-free now and staying low-carb. Maybe my asthma will be gone and my daughter’s horrible itchy rash all over her arms will finally leave! Absolutely wonderful book, thank you! Wow. We know that consumption of modern wheat is associated with causing type 1 diabetes in children, average age of onset 4 years Continue reading >>

You Can Beat Diabetes

You Can Beat Diabetes

En español | FICTION: If you're at high risk for diabetes, you're going to get the disease. FACT: The Diabetes Prevention Program — which followed more than 3,000 overweight, prediabetic men and women at 27 research centers — found that people who lost even a little weight and exercised consistently (a goal of 30 minutes five days a week) reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58 percent. (People 60 and up cut their risk by a whopping 71 percent.) "If you're overweight, try to reduce your daily intake by 500 calories," says Christine Tobin of the American Diabetes Association (ADA). FICTION: Diabetics need a special diet. FACT: Not long ago diabetics were urged to forgo sweets and drastically limit their intake of carbohydrates. But a slew of new research suggests that diabetics are best served by following the same healthy guidelines everyone else does: plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean meat and dairy products, and sparing amounts of heart-healthy fats. FICTION: There's a cure for diabetes. FACT: Halle Berry's claims to the contrary — in 2007 she announced she had been cured of her type 1 diabetes — there is no cure for either type 1 or type 2 diabetes, says Sue Kirkman, M.D., senior vice president at the ADA. According to a study published last year in the Annals of Internal Medicine, however, 56 percent of type 2 diabetics who followed a Mediterranean-style diet could control their blood sugar without medication. FICTION: Being overweight causes diabetes. FACT: Just because you're heavy doesn't mean you'll automatically get diabetes. In fact, 34 percent of adults 20 and older are obese, but just 10.7 percent have diabetes. Still, experts agree that being obese, especially combined with a genetic predisposition for diabetes, can tr Continue reading >>

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