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Can You Be A Paramedic With Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 Diabetes In The Fire Service?

Type 1 Diabetes In The Fire Service?

Being diabetic, I am a Fire Explorer, and I have been diabetic since 8 months old. Is there any advice that can help me to get hired either on an ambulance or a fire department? Permalink Reply by Jim Conrad on May 28, 2013 at 12:03am We have no policy against diabetics in the dept. But I know a private pilot who is diabetic, he just has to keep it under perfect control. Permalink Reply by Timothy John Dodson on May 28, 2013 at 12:12am There is no reason why you cannot get hired by a Fire/Rescue/EMS agency, as long as your DM is under control. I have worked with several EMT's/FF's who were diabetic and they functioned just fine. Don't let it stop you from realizing your goal. Permalink Reply by Ben Peirce on May 28, 2013 at 1:06am Thank you! The reason I ask is because my friend that works in a hospital has a friend who is diabetic and an ER Tech who got a job on an ambulance as an EMT and 6 months later got a letter from California saying that she had to resign, because she was not allowed to have an ambulance license and shouldn't have been able to get one in the first place,and can't be a firefighter. She tried to fight it in court and still was denied. Permalink Reply by FETC on May 28, 2013 at 7:50am Ben good question and to be honest it all depends on the agency you are looking to work for. Depends ifthey useamedical standard, and if they do does the standard havepre-disposed medical conditions that would disqualify you in a pre-employment medical screening. Some places use the DOT medical standard like a truck driver or an ariline pilot. Where I work we use the NFPA 1582 Part A standard for new hires and NFPA 1582Part B standard for re-current annual physicals. Then againI know many fire and EMS departments in the United States thatprovide no physicals what so e Continue reading >>

What Kind Of Jobs Can We Have As Type 1's?

What Kind Of Jobs Can We Have As Type 1's?

What kind of jobs can we have as Type 1's? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. What kind of jobs can we have as Type 1's? I know you cannot be a police officer, fire fighter, air controller, etc. I'm curious as to what kind of jobs you all have, or jobs you've been knocked back for? I personally wish that one day I can be a paramedic, but i'm worried that it will have restrictions as per the air force, military, police, fire, etc. I'm currently a qualified child care worker. I'm a Registered Nurse Have been nursing for 29 years now been diabetic for nearly 28 years. I have managed in all areas and have worked all shifts as well as double shifts etc. I've been in the ER twice in 24hrs and I feel for the nurses who had to tell with some increasingly "problematic" people who entered the ER @ 2am. I'm a Registered Nurse Have been nursing for 29 years now been diabetic for nearly 28 years. I have managed in all areas and have worked all shifts as well as double shifts etc. I know you cannot be a police officer, fire fighter, air controller, etc. I know we all hear about these things, I heard years ago it was fighter/commercial pilot and scuba diving that were barred, but I think we need to be really careful about assuming we are right about these things we have been told, often casually or from people who might have known a year ago but don't know now! I would take the line "innocent until proven guilty"... don't assume you are barred for any job until you get an answer in black and white from the relevant authority. Cassandra, I see nothing mentioned in the queensland ambo info about diabetes or conditions being a general problem. Continue reading >>

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is a systemic disease of the endocrine system resulting from the insufficiency/dysfunction of the pancreas. It is a complex disorder of fat, carbohydrates, and protein metabolism. Diabetes mellitus is potentially lethal, putting the patient at risk for several types of medical emergencies. It is characterized by a lack of insulin, or a persons inability to use insulin. In order to properly manage the numerous calls for diabetics, it is important for EMS professionals to have a basic knowledge of diabetes (DM) before dealing with the associated emergencies that may arise as a result of the disease. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, as well as, it is estimated that 5 + million US citizens become diabetic annually and don't realize they have the disease until an emergency arises. To truly understand the signs and symptoms of the various related conditions, we must first, comprehend some basic pathophysiology. The primary energy fuel for cells is glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar that accounts for approximately 95 percent of the sugar in the bloodstream after gastrointestinal absorption. Thus, it is the blood glucose level that EMS and other health care practitioners are most interested in determining. The key function of insulin (A hormone secreted by the beta cells in the pancreas) is to move glucose from the blood into the cells, where it can be used for energy. However, insulin does not directly carry glucose into the cell, it triggers a receptor on the plasma membrane to open a channel allowing a protein helper (through the process of facilitated diffusion), to carry the glucose molecule into the cell. As long as any insulin is available in the blood, is active, is effective, and is able to stimulate the rece Continue reading >>

Hypos With Emergency Assistance – What Happens During A Diabetic Emergency?

Hypos With Emergency Assistance – What Happens During A Diabetic Emergency?

back to Overview Know-how Type 1 You're strolling home after a long day, you feel wiped out and pretty hungry. A quick meal and bumming around on the couch sounds perfect. At least that was the plan... But suddenly your brain screams 'hypo' and the next thing you know you wake up to strange people looking down at you. It's your worst nightmare; a low blood sugar that requires emergency assistance. If I’m too slow or get caught off guard Hypos make us feel lousy, shaky, and just bad. We often just want to feel better again! And most of the time, we can handle it ourselves with a bit of juice, glucose, or whatever we choose. But sometimes we might need a little help from friends, family, or co-workers. Even then, it’s usually not too bad. But what if we’re out alone and get caught off guard, or if the low happens too fast, and we lose our senses or pass out? What exactly happens while we’re “not there” to experience it? I was really curious, so I started asking some questions. Quick and effective help – usually I interviewed some first responders, paramedics, and firefighters here in Austria and asked them about their experiences helping us Monster Tamers. I’m sure there are many differences according to regional practices, licensing, and guidelines, but I think it’s still useful to share what I learned. What happens should you pass out is actually pretty uneventful, save the worry and concern of those around you. Hopefully someone sees that you need help and calls quickly. There is another article’s worth of discussion on this point alone, but for today, let’s assume rescue has been called and are on their way. In most populated areas, it shouldn’t take more than a few minutes for them to arrive. Medical ID Upon arrival, they will check if you are Continue reading >>

Emt Crews Often Unprepared For Diabetic Crises

Emt Crews Often Unprepared For Diabetic Crises

EMT Crews Often Unprepared for Diabetic Crises FRIDAY, Jan. 26, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- If you call 911, you expect to get the medical services you need. But new research suggests that when it comes to severe low blood sugar episodes in people with diabetes , first responders might not be able to administer a potentially lifesaving medication called glucagon . Glucagon is an injectable medication that prompts the liver to release stored glucose. This quickly raises blood sugar. "In most states, basic EMTs [emergency medical technicians] cannot administer glucagon," said study senior author Dr. Robert Gabbay, chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. But paramedics can give the injections, said Dr. Craig Manifold, medical director of the National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians. That's because paramedics get between 750 and 1,500 hours of education compared to about 100 to 150 hours of training for EMTs. Low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia) generally occur in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes taking insulin or other blood sugar-lowering medications. Researchers said more than 100,000 serious hypoglycemia episodes occur each year. Gabbay noted even U.S. Supreme Court justices aren't immune to this problem. Earlier this month, Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who has type 1 diabetes, had to call emergency services for help with serious low blood sugar. Early symptoms include shakiness, confusion and sweating. Left untreated, low blood sugar can cause seizures, unconsciousness and even death, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). These episodes can usually be treated with a food or drink containing fast-acting carbohydrates, such as glucose tablets, juice or sugar-sweetened soda, the ADA said. Sometimes the episodes are more Continue reading >>

The Ambulance Of Shame

The Ambulance Of Shame

I came out of my dreamlike state, trying to figure out where I was and what was happening. This didnt feel like my bed, or my couch. I could hear things but I didnt recognize the voices that were around me. He looks like hes coming out of it now, said one voice. Things started making a little more sense. It had happened again. I was in the back of an ambulance. I was coming out of an insulin shock. Can you hear me? shouted another. You had a little trouble. This isnt very good for you, you know. Suddenly I was awash in shame. I couldnt believe this happened to meagain. You really shouldnt let this happen to you, the second voice shouted. Then, just as quickly, shame changed to anger. I had been through this drill before. I had met an EMT team like this: Good EMT and Bad EMT, the one who did his/her job with compassion and skill, while the other castigated you. I wished I had said to the Bad EMT, How dare you! Who do you think you are, judging me? Instead, I was mute and in no condition for an argument. Ive lived 31 of my 44 years with Type 1 diabetes and, like everyone else whos dealing with this condition, sometimes my blood sugar levels drop. Usually Im able to handle it without anyone noticing. This time, though, it just got the better of me. During the ride, I slowly tried to retrace my steps to how I ended up this way. I had to drop a car off at my in-laws condo a little over a mile from my house. I could have taken a cab to get home, but it was just such a short walk and I thought Id get to enjoy the beautiful summer weather. Also, theres a Trader Joes just a couple blocks from the condo, so I figured Id do a little shopping on the way home. I was wearing my insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor on the walk. However, I had awakened several times the night b Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

This is a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having Type 1 Diabetes. If something has inspired you or enraged you, here's your opportunity to let everyone know. I'm after some advice from a diabetic who is a career firefighter in either the MFB or the CFA, but feel free to give advice if you're from another state. I'm trying to get into the MFB however I'm not sure if it's possible for a type 1 diabetic. I've read conflicting information online. I've had diabetes for 10 years, a pump for 8 and my control is pretty good. HbA1C's for the last 12 months have been 6.6, 6.5, 6.9 and 7.9. If it would help my chances of getting in I'd even look into getting a CGM. Will they consider me for the job if I can prove that my diabetes will not affect my ability to perform the necessary tasks or will having type 1 diabetes automatically disqualify me from getting past the medical examination? I'm not sure about the fire service (sorry), but as a paramedic (Qld) I'm proof that T1ers can be accepted into Emergency Services... with a bit of running around and jumping through hoops... My initial suggestion would be get personal. Directly write to/email the person in charge of the services you are specifically interested in. State that you are interested in joining. Tell them that you are diabetic and that the purpose of your writing is to ascertain what additional evidence/measures (if any) would be required to be undertaken/submitted with your application. Explain that you are an exceptionally well-controlled diabetic and that you don't believe that your T1 would interfere with your ability to do the job. Unless they specifically ask prior to giving you an answer, I also recommend not being to be too detailed in your history or too te Continue reading >>

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Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. After completing the CAPTCHA below, you will immediately regain access to Continue reading >>

Dos And Don Ts Of Medical Id For Type Diabetics | Diabetic Connect

Dos And Don Ts Of Medical Id For Type Diabetics | Diabetic Connect

Dos and Don'ts of Medical ID for Type 1 Diabetics By Dr John Latest Reply2014-02-05 17:24:16 -0600 I used to train paramedics. So, I know how they react or don't react. Also, many places are so desperate for volunteer paramedics, they often train people who are less qualified than they should be. Therefore, make it easy for them to identify your condition. I know of a paramedic who wears a morphine pump and has difficulty walking. Enough said 1. Type 1 diabetics MUST WEAR a MEDICA ID. 3. Wear a bracelet or wear a necklace. Paramedics are trained to look for a bracelet or necklace. 3. DO NOT wear an id that say "Diabetes." What does that mean - type 1 or type 2? What does that indicate - Hypoglycemia or cardiac arrest? 4. Wear an ID that says "Type 1 Diabetes." It can also say Insulin Dependent in addition to Type 1 Diabetes or insulin pump in addition to Type 1 Diabetes. 5. Most custom ID's are hard to read, especially in low light conditions. Pre-engraved is much better. Make it easy for the paramedics. 6. Bracelets pre-engraved on the back are less effective than one pre-engraved on the front. Make it easy for the paramedics. 7. In addition to your medical id, carry a card or piece of paper in your wallet providing all of your medical information such as type of insulin used, insulin pump, insulin to carbohydrate ratios, allergies, etc. Make it easy for the doctors at the hospital. 8. Remember, make it easy for the paramedic to identify your condition. Continue reading >>

Can A Person With Type 1 Diabetes Become A Paramedic?

Can A Person With Type 1 Diabetes Become A Paramedic?

Can a person with Type 1 Diabetes become a Paramedic? Hello, I am 16 and have had Type 1 Diabetes for 4 years now. I really would like to train as a Paramedic, however many people have told me that because of... show more Hello, I am 16 and have had Type 1 Diabetes for 4 years now. I really would like to train as a Paramedic, however many people have told me that because of my Diabetes they will not allow me! I was wondering whether anyone had any advice and whether this is true? Thank you! Go for it! Don't let anyone tell you you can't do something because of your diabetes. I wanted to join the police - everyone told me I'd never get in because of my diabetes and I listened. I recently met a police officer with type 1 diabetes and thought "if only I hadn't listened ... that coulda been me!!! Now I compete as a figure athlete - everyone told me I couldn't do it, but I did - if I can do that then you can save people from heart attacks etc etc. Follow your dream - don't be the one who always regrets not trying! xxx This Site Might Help You.RE:Can a person with Type 1 Diabetes become a Paramedic?Hello, I am 16 and have had Type 1 Diabetes for 4 years now. I really... show more This Site Might Help You. Can a person with Type 1 Diabetes become a Paramedic? Hello, I am 16 and have had Type 1 Diabetes for 4 years now. I really would like to train as a Paramedic, however many people have told me that because of my Diabetes they will not allow me! I was wondering whether anyone had any advice and whether this is true? Thank you! Source(s): person type 1 diabetes paramedic: Source(s): Reverse Any Diabetes Easily : Diabetes, also called diabetes mellitus, has become a very common heath problem. How to reverse diabetes naturally are two main... show more Diabetes, also called dia Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Is On The Rise In Kids: Here’s What Parents Need To Know

Type 1 Diabetes Is On The Rise In Kids: Here’s What Parents Need To Know

More kids are being diagnosed with juvenile diabetes. Here’s how to manage the disease and keep your kid healthy. Photo: iStockphoto “We just thought he had a stomach bug,” Rebecca Cook recalls, thinking back to the day two years ago when her only child, 10-month-old Theo, became ill. “He was throwing up, seemed really thirsty and was peeing a lot.” But then Theo took a turn for the worse. “He started doing this strange breathing pattern and he was actually borderline unconscious.” Cook and her husband called the public health nurse who got an ambulance to bring their limp, non-responsive son to Janeway Children’s Health & Rehabilitation Centre ER in St. John’s. A blood test conducted by the paramedics revealed that Theo had type 1 diabetes. His extreme thirst and vomiting were classic signs of the disease, which can also include symptoms such as extreme tiredness, frequent urination and sudden weight loss despite constant hunger. Rogers Media uses cookies for personalization, to customize its online advertisements, and for other purposes. Learn more or change your cookie preferences. Rogers Media supports the Digital Advertising Alliance principles. By continuing to use our service, you agree to our use of cookies. We use cookies (why?) You can change cookie preferences. Continued site use signifies consent. Play Video Play Mute Current Time 0:00 / Duration Time 0:00 Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Stream TypeLIVE Remaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate 1 Chapters Chapters descriptions off, selected Descriptions subtitles off, selected Subtitles captions settings, opens captions settings dialog captions off, selected Captions Audio Track Fullscreen This is a modal window. Captions Settings Dialog Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window. Continue reading >>

Does Anyone Know If A Type One Diabetic Can Get A Job As A Paramedic? - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

Does Anyone Know If A Type One Diabetic Can Get A Job As A Paramedic? - Diabetes - Type 1 - Medhelp

does anyone know if a type one diabetic can get a job as a paramedic? 1 cousin is a Firefighter, Another is a EMT and Another is a Paramedic.. and all a T1's.... I suggest you ask for the Application and Qualifications for the Medical first... You best not only have Very good Control,( <6% A1c's )andknow how and what to do when ( not if) you don't have the time to be testing ever couple of hours to keep control and how oyu handle to keep yourself from going Hypo under Very Physical Conditions... One way? Start out with a 60-80 Level and go Jog on the treadmill and when you start getting your Hypo? What do you do to correct it..? and your not going to be able to keep a bottle of Juice with you either... More like harder things like Gum Drops, Jelly Beans, etc.. And go to a Gymn and Do some weight lifting.. again, starting out with 80 BS levels... When you have proven you canhandle these kinds of situations, you will have alot more confidence and it will show that your In control...Or not... and also keep in mind... You maybe able to pass the test now, but this is a Progressive disease and you best be "on top" of it like a Duck on a June Bug 110% of the time, for you don't get even to make 1 Mistake on these kinds of Jobs... Also,Towns are getting more and more reluctanthiring "Medically /Physically Challendged" people.. Because they causemajor financial impacts on their Retirement and/or Disability Health Care....and thus " Improving" their training programs... And what DLife and the ADA would LIKE to it to be and what it IS are 2 different things..in the Real World.... regardles of what the State laws might say about it.. Since the States What to get everyone else to hire them so they won't have to support them thru Public aid/Welfare, Unemployement, etc... Good Luck, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetic Emergencies paramedics regularly attend a variety of diabetic emergencies. Many diabetic emergencies can be avoided through good diabetic education. This is why it is so important for paramedics to have a thorough understanding of the disease process of diabetes, so that you can provide good basic diabetic advice. Pancreas Is both an exocrine and endocrine gland. The exocrine portion functions in digestion. Its endocrine functions are relevant to the pathophysiology of diabetes. It is a flattened organ of 12.5-15cm length, consisting of a head, body and tail. It is located posteriorly to the stomach and is attached to the small intestine and the spleen. The majority of the pancreas (99%), is made up of clusters called acini which are the exocrine portion. It has 700 000 1000 000 small endocrine glands, the pancreatic islets (islets of Langerhans) which are scattered throughout the organ and consist of: Delta cells (5%) that secrete somatostatin F cells that secrete pancreatic polypeptide In the average adult the liver weighs between 1200-1600gms. It is located in the right upper quadrant below the diaphragm and consists of two lobes. It has numerous functions. The functions related to diabetic crises are described below. The liver stores excess glucose in the form of the polymer glycogen. When stimulated by certain hormones the liver performs glycogenesis and gluconeogenesis. Glycogenolysis the breakdown of glycogen into glucose. Gluconeogenesis the creation of glucose from lactate, amino acids (not including leucine and lysine) and glycerol. Diabetes comes from the Greek word meaning to siphon Mellitus comes from a the Latin word that means sweet like honey (Lundstrom & Rossini, 1998) It was first described by Ebers Papyrus in 1500 BC. In 10 AD Celsus develop Continue reading >>

Are Type 1 Diabetics Allowed To Join The Army?

Are Type 1 Diabetics Allowed To Join The Army?

Are Type 1 Diabetics allowed to join the army? I really wanna join the military but i doubt if they wold accept me since i am an insulin dependent. I was rejected to work in a cruise ship because of that, i'm afraid the military would reject me too :( Short answer, yes. I tried and was denied. However, there are exceptions to that rule. I was told that if I stopped taking insulin, lied, passed a physical and made it to basic training they would take me- what a joke! In other words, if you find out once you are already in you can stay, but if you already have it its not worth their time. Unfortunately you would never get through basic training, They would surely find that pump :) You can't be a police officer or a firefighter, or a paramedic either, It is obvious why, If you were separated from your unit for even a few days, you would likely die. Any job where you would have to drive, they just don't want the added risks. I was a paramedic when I was diagnosed. I was offered a desk job. I moved into laboratory science instead. Now Tim I must disagree with you in the aspect of the firefighter, paramedic part. I have been a paramedic for the last 14 years and am still riding the gut bus 3 days a week. Maybe in some areas they will not accept you for the job but it seems that it would be against the law. Just saying!!! Yes they will denie you into the military!! It sucks but they are way better jobs out there. Trust me, I spent 6 years in the military, I loved what I did but i found that civi life has more to offer. No theres not a lot of glory in EMS but its a great job and you can go so far with it. And this is a job they can never do without. Dont give up hope on jobs or following your dreams. I'm sorry, you won't be allowed to enlist and it is not just T1, any form of Continue reading >>

Can You Be An Emt/paramedic With Diabetes?

Can You Be An Emt/paramedic With Diabetes?

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 8 Comments Note: This article has been updated after numerous comments. Recently, Jared contacted us with a question could he obtain a license to drive an ambulance in his home state of California, and work as an EMT/Paramedic while taking insulin? California is a bit tricky when it comes to who can obtain an Ambulance Drivers License, as are many other states. Becoming an EMT/Paramedic with diabetes, you may be required to drive the ambulance. Some states follow the federal guidelines for interstate trucking, where drivers must obtain a medical waiver for diabetes from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), when getting an ambulance drivers certificate as an EMT/Paramedic. Before we continue with this article, I wanted to let you know we have researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to your diet and reverse your diabetes. Want to check out our insights? Download our free PDF Guide Power Foods to Eat here. For an EMT/Paramedic to get an ambulance drivers license with insulin-requiring diabetes, you must go through the process that exists in your home state. Each state and some jurisdictions have their own rules for driving and for levels and certification requirements for EMT personnel and Paramedics. It can take up to 90 days or more to get an ambulance drivers certification from your state Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV). You can appeal the decision if you get turned down the first time. The second time, you will have to provide your medical records to demonstrate that you are self-managing your diabetes. The rules and regulations are quite complicated, and a person with diabetes has a long process to go through when trying to get started in an EMS/Paramedic career. With perseverance, even a person Continue reading >>

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