diabetestalk.net

Can You Be A Diabetic And Have A Cdl?

End Of The Road: Diabetes Care When Insulin May Not Be An Option

End Of The Road: Diabetes Care When Insulin May Not Be An Option

Go to: PRESENTATION J.U. is a 53-year-old man with uncomplicated type 2 diabetes who requires a commercial driver’s license (CDL) for his occupation as a truck driver and mechanic. His diabetes was controlled with increasing doses of metformin and glipizide during the first 4 years after his diagnosis. Despite nutrition counseling, diabetes education classes, and physician visits every 3–6 months, nonadherence with therapeutic lifestyle changes contributed to his A1C fluctuating between 7.2 and 10.2% over 3 years. His health care provider recommended insulin therapy numerous times, but J.U.’s needle fear, lifestyle preferences, and fear of losing his job led to patient refusal and clinical inertia. He is seen for an urgent appointment after his Department of Transportation (DOT) physical was failed for hyperglycemia (glucose > 200 mg/dl) and significant levels of glucose in the urine. He reports fatigue, polyphagia, polydipsia, and polyuria. He has not been compliant with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) or recommended therapeutic lifestyle changes. At the time of this visit, his diabetes medication regimen consists of metformin 1,000 mg twice daily and glipizide 10 mg twice daily with meals. His A1C is 8.1%, weight is 207 lb (BMI 32.5 kg/m2), blood pressure is 110/72 mmHg, pulse is 80 bpm, serum creatinine is 0.9 mg/dl, total cholesterol is 116 mg/dl, triglyceride level is 207 mg/dl, LDL cholesterol is 46 mg/dl, and HDL cholesterol is 29 mg/dl. He has a known history of hyperlipidemia treated with a statin, hypertension treated with an ACE inhibitor, and gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with a proton pump inhibitor. He has smoked two packs of cigarettes per day for 32 years, with multiple failed quit attempts, and denies alcohol or illicit drug use. Continue reading >>

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Rules And Routines For Truckers With Diabetes

Truck drivers often work long hours, travel great distances and are responsible for the safe operation of large trucks. Long haul truck drivers have more than twice the risk of diabetes due to high stress and unhealthy food options. A study published in 2010 stated “”88% of truck drivers suffered from at least one risk factor including smoking, hypertension or obesity. There is a rate of 28% in long haul truck drivers at risk for sleep apnea, a condition which limits proper sleep”. Because of these problems, truck drivers may have been targeted about their health and driving. Recently there has been a lot of confusion about truckers with diabetes obtaining a CDL license. Learn more about the rules for truckers with diabetes. Years ago, there was a ban that prevented truck drivers with diabetes who used insulin from driving commercial vehicles for interstate operation. In 2003, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMSCA) introduced the Diabetes Exemption Program. This permitted people with insulin treated diabetes to drive a commercial vehicle in interstate commerce; however, you needed three years of previous commercial driving experience to qualify. By 2005, this was changed. Even if you are on insulin, there is no need to show previous commercial driving experience. While the new law alleviated the need to have previous driving experience for individuals with diabetes who take insulin, there are 57 provisions, guidelines and screenings to pass in order to get a CDL. Applicants must also watch state requirements related to obtaining a commercial driver license. Drivers with insulin treated diabetes must show they have control of the condition while on insulin. Those with type 1 diabetes must be on insulin for a minimum of 2 months before they can appl Continue reading >>

Driving On Insulin: Diabetes Forecast

Driving On Insulin: Diabetes Forecast

I am a 74-year-old who has had diabetes for the past 20 years. I work part-time driving large trucks 3 1/2 days or more every week. I now take two pills a day. How am I going to be able to keep my Department of Transportation (DOT) license if I need to start using insulin? The exam states in large print not to use insulin. I sent a request to DOT in Washington for an exemption, but with the doctors they want me to see and the papers they want me to fill out, I'm not sure if it's worth it. Herb Bertsche, Woodburn, Indiana Katie Hathaway, Associate Director, Legal Advocacy, American Diabetes Association, responds: The situation you are facing is common and is why ADA has been fighting for so long on behalf of commercial drivers with diabetes. For many years, federal law prohibited anyone with insulin-treated diabetes from operating a commercial motor vehicle in interstate commerce. While some states permitted people who use insulin to drive within their state, that only allowed a few people to maintain jobs in commercial driving. These rules, dating back to the 1970s, were based on a misunderstanding of diabetes, especially how the disease is managed today. It is true that some people, because of the complications of diabetes, cannot safely drive a commercial vehicle. That is not true for most people. Fairness requires that each person be judged as an individual based on how diabetes affects him or her. ADA worked for many years, through Congress and the administrative process, to eliminate this blanket ban. In 2003, we succeeded, and the Diabetes Exemption Program was born, establishing a system of individual assessment. This was a big step forward, but the program contained a provision that disqualified anyone who hadn't been driving a commercial vehicle while using in Continue reading >>

Insulin Diabetes And The Cdl Truck Driver

Insulin Diabetes And The Cdl Truck Driver

There still appears to be some confusion concerning whether or not persons with insulin diabetes are able to obtain a CDL license. For years, there was a ban that prevented those with diabetes who used insulin from driving commercial vehicles within interstate operation. However, in 2003, the FMCSA introduced the Diabetes Exemption Program which allowed individuals with insulin treated diabetes the ability to operate a CMV in interstate commerce. In the beginning, this new regulation still had its problems. Mainly, it still required that people with insulin diabetes must have already driven commercially for the previous three years. If not, they would not be qualified for the exemption. Therefore, this three year rule made the new regulation, basically worthless for any new, potential CDL holders. This three year rule made it so difficult, that from 2003 to 2005, only four exemptions were issued. Then, in late 2005, everything changed for the better. Due to the effort by the American Diabetes Association, President Bush signed into law, doing away with the three year requirement. There is no longer any need to show previous commercial driving experience, even if you are on insulin. However, there still are 57 other screenings, guidelines and provisions that one must pass in order to be granted the exemption. Also, one must abide by any particular state requirements in regards to the commercial driver license. There are many questions and answers floating around the net stating that it is not possible to receive a CDL if you have insulin diabetes. The Truth is . . . it is now possible to do so, with some exceptions, thanks to the new regulations of the Diabetes Exemption Program, signed into law in 2005. Until the physical qualification standards within the regulations a Continue reading >>

Orlando Cdl Physical Facts: Diabetes And The Commercial Driver Physical Exam (cdl Medical Exam)

Orlando Cdl Physical Facts: Diabetes And The Commercial Driver Physical Exam (cdl Medical Exam)

Orlando CDL Physical Facts Will Diabetics Ever Rule the World? Maybe Not But At Least They Can Now Drive Around It for A Living Orlando CDL Physical Facts: Diabetes and the Commercial Driver Physical Exam ( CDL Medical Exam ) Not too long ago, being an insulin-dependent diabetic meant you couldnt drive commercially because you couldnt pass the CDL physical examor the CDL medical exam . Of course, this resulted in many drivers being considerably upset. But this was not the fault of any or all DOT physical locations or doctorsit was the law. Then, the law was changed in 2003 to add a Diabetes Exemption as part of the commercial driver physical exam (CDL physical / CDL physical exam) process. Yet, to qualify for this diabetes exemption you already had to have been driving commercially for 3 years with your insulin-dependent diabetes under control (A1C of 7 10) as evidenced by a successful commercial driver medical exam that covered the full range of physical tests and testing. Because this exemption caught most of these drivers in a catch-22 (they couldnt previously drive with insulin-dependent diabetes but had to have been driving for 3 years while being insulin-dependent in order to qualify for the exemption), only 4 people were able to pass the CDL physical exam and obtain their CDL physical certification between 2003 and 2005. In 2005, the law regarding diabetics and the commercial driver physical exam was amended. Intrastate insulin-dependent drivers are able to be certified. Interstate drivers on the other hand, must still qualify for the commercial driver physical exemption as determined by the commercial driver physical exam (CDL physical / CDL physical exam). Unfortunately, the exemption to the CDL physical requirements regarding insulin-treated diabetes, can tak Continue reading >>

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Feds Greenlight Exemption For Truckers With Diabetes

Certain truck drivers who suffer from diabetes will be allowed to operate commercial motor vehicles in spite of their health conditions, federal regulators said Tuesday. The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is exempting dozens of truck drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes from rules that would otherwise prohibit them from operating a truck. "FMCSA evaluated the eligibility of the drivers and determined that granting the exemptions to these individuals would achieve a level of safety equivalent to or greater than the level that would be achieved by complying with the current regulation," the agency wrote in the Federal Register. The rules are intended to prevent truck drivers from endangering other drivers on the road. Federal regulators have begun cracking down on truckers who violate these and other safety regulations, particularly in the wake of the crash that nearly killed comedian Tracy Morgan. The FMCSA said Tuesday that these 72 drivers who use insulin to treat their diabetes have it reasonably under control and do not pose any additional danger to other drivers on the road. They will receive a two-year exemption from the rules. The FMCSA is not exempting all drivers who use insulin from the rules, however — only those that it believes do not pose a risk on the roads. Furthermore, truck drivers that no longer need insulin to treat their diabetes are also exempt from the rules. Continue reading >>

Commercial Driver's Licenses-applicants With Diabetes

Commercial Driver's Licenses-applicants With Diabetes

Topic: DISEASES; AUTOMOBILE SAFETY STANDARDS; DRIVER LICENSES; DRIVER EDUCATION; Location: MOTOR VEHICLES - LICENSES; October 28, 2005 2005-R-0805 COMMERCIAL DRIVER'S LICENSES-APPLICANTS WITH DIABETES By: George Coppolo, Chief Attorney You asked if there is any new legislation about commercial driver's licenses (CDL) for people with diabetes. SUMMARY State law requires anyone driving a “commercial motor vehicle” in Connecticut to hold a CDL issued by Connecticut or some other state, with applicable endorsements valid for the vehicle he is driving (CGS § 14-44a). The CDL law defines a “commercial motor vehicle” as any vehicle (1) with a gross vehicle weight rating of 26,001 pounds or more; (2) designed to transport 16 or more passengers, including the driver; (3) designed to transport 11 or more passengers, including the driver, and used to transport students under age 21 to and from school; or (4) transporting hazardous materials and required to have warning placards under federal hazardous materials transportation regulations (CGS § 14-1(a)(13)). Thus, some vehicles are commercial in nature, such as a truck with a gross weight rating of less than 26,000 pounds, but do not require the operator to have a CDL. The law exempts the following from CDL requirements: vehicles used for farming purposes within 150 miles of the farm, fire fighting apparatus, authorized emergency vehicles, recreational vehicles, and military vehicles operated by military personnel. Connecticut's laws on CDLs generally reflect the requirements of federal law. The federal Commercial Motor Vehicle Safety Act of 1986 established a program under which state-issued licenses for drivers of commercial motor vehicles have to meet minimum national standards. State law prohibits the motor vehicles Continue reading >>

Driving A Truck With Diabetes

Driving A Truck With Diabetes

Leonard Auter has lived with type 2 diabetes for 12 years, with an insulin pump, while living in Colorado. Everyone on his mother’s side of the family has lived with diabetes. As a commercial vehicle truck driver, Leonard has to take his diabetes management very seriously. At one time in history, not too long ago, this line of work was out of the question for a person taking insulin. This means all people with type 1 diabetes, and type 2s who manage their diabetes with pumps, pens, or syringes. Tractors, trailers, semi-trucks, and more…all require a CDL (commercial driver’s license), but a person with diabetes has a few obstacles to overcome before they can even take that test. Ginger: Tell me your story of getting into this line of work with your diabetes along for the “ride.” Leonard: In 1970, they passed legislation for a blanket ban on type 1 diabetics not allowed to drive a truck. Up until 1992 they did a few studies, mostly talk, on type 1 diabetic’s being allowed to drive a CMV in interstate driving. The blanket ban was still in effect, and they started the first federal test waiver program, with 488 applicants. Only 139 of those drivers met the qualifications and were issued waivers. The program ended in 1996, and the federal government turned the authority over to each individual state, most states stayed with the federal ban, Colorado is one of the states that adopted the waiver program for intrastate only, and it’s on a case-by-case basis. Today there is a federal waiver program again, it’s also a case-by-case basis. Strict rules and restrictions apply to the waivers. Ginger: What is the hardest part of being a truck driver with diabetes? Leonard: I’ve been working for my current employer since 1981, so I was already driving and operating he Continue reading >>

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

Truck Drivers With Diabetes Dot Regulations

The Department of Transportation (DOT) and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) adapted medical guidelines that diabetic truck drivers must meet. They are part of the requirements for obtaining an interstate Commercial Driver’s License (CDL). At one point in time, a truck driver with diabetes had to prove they have had diabetic episodes for three years to qualify for the diabetic exemption program. Since the diabetic exemption program was revised, this qualification no longer applies. Read below to find out what the new DOT regulations mean for prospective truck drivers with diabetes. Changing DOT regulations for diabetic truck drivers The first diabetic exemption program was established in 2003. It contained a long list of stipulations that made it hard for diabetic truck drivers to qualify for their CDL. This kept many capable truck drivers from employment with interstate trucking companies. One of the main DOT regulations hindering diabetic drivers from qualifying for the exemption program was the three-year rule. The three-year rule stated truck drivers with diabetes must have a record of driving for three years without a diabetic episode, and must have been on insulin for that time. It prevented nearly all potential drivers with diabetes from meeting the old DOT regulations. Between 2003 and 2005, only four exemptions were granted to diabetic truck drivers. On November 8, 2005, the FMCSA overturned some of the rules stated in the 2003 diabetic exemption program. The agency made vital changes, opening the road to more diabetic truck drivers. The FMCSA started accepting applications for the revised diabetic exemption program on September 22, 2005. Implementing changes in the DOT program for diabetic truck drivers The 2005 DOT regulations for the Continue reading >>

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

How To Pursue Your Cdl If You Have Diabetes

Have diabetes and want to pursue a CDL? While you will have to take some extra steps, it is totally possible and will be worth the effort if this is the career path you are passionate about. Some History First Prior to 2005, people with diabetes taking insulin were not able to become truck drivers. Thanks to a 2005 transportation bill, however, things have since changed. Now a person with Type 1 Diabetes who takes insulin is able to drive in interstate commerce. Although there are numerous requirements that the individual must meet, it is now possible for those with diabetes to become CDL drivers. What is Necessary to Obtain a CDL if You Have Diabetes Those with Type 2 diabetes that do not take insulin only need to follow their state guidelines related to obtaining and keeping a CDL. They will not need to file a Federal Diabetes Exemption and can still cross state lines; however, if you find out that you are going to be on insulin, you will have to file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Those with Type 1 Diabetes can get a CDL but will need to meet certain medical criteria and file for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. To begin, applicants for the Federal Diabetes Exemption with Type 1 diabetes will need to have been taking their insulin for at least 2 months prior to applying for the exemption. Applicants with Type 2 diabetes must have been taking their insulin for one month. You will need to have a health evaluation performed by a physician that is listed as a “medical examiner” on the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration’s (FMCSA) National Registry. Other evaluations may include tests conducted by an endocrinologist, ophthalmologist, or optometrist. There is also a list of medical criteria which must be met, including: • You must not have had had one o Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Dot Medical Waivers

Type 1 Diabetes And Dot Medical Waivers

I thought I would tap the hive mind on here to give me some advice/information on obtaining a Class A CDL license with insulin dependent Type 1 diabetes. I did a search on here but it looks like the thread I found was over 2 years old and I didn't want to look at old/changed info. I did a search online and saw that there is a waiver that can be obtained and that an insulin dependent Type 1 diabetic cannot be outright disqualified as a driver anymore. I'm hoping that at some point my husband will take an interest in driving and eventually want to team with me, but he's insulin dependent. It's well controlled, and it's been over 20 years since he was hospitalized for anything related to his diabetes. He has no peripheral vascular disease (yet), no eye problems, and really no other problems other than taking a long acting insulin before bed and fast acting insulin before each meal. He checks his blood sugars regularly, and when he feels he's getting low a quick glass of orange juice usually does the trick. I was just wondering if the medical waivers are difficult to obtain, and if anyone on here has had to obtain the same waivers and what it was like and what it is that we might need to keep in mind. Now that I've started CDL school he's actually seemed more interested in the idea, and I would like to encourage him as much as I can. A CDL is required to drive any of the following vehicles: Any combination of vehicles with a gross combined weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 or more pounds, providing the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the vehicle being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds. Any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing another not in excess of 10,000 pounds. Any vehicle, regardless of size, designed to transport 16 or Continue reading >>

News Dedicated To A Healthy Workplace

News Dedicated To A Healthy Workplace

The Department of Transportation (DOT) Medical Examination is very highly regulated as illness complications can have serious consequences for the driver, the examiner, and the general public. DOT medical guidelines outline the health criteria that commercial vehicle drivers must meet to qualify for certification. One health condition that is closely reviewed by the DOT is diabetes. Individuals with known or suspected diabetes are required to provide specific medical information to the DOT-certifying physician regarding diabetic control. The DOT definition of diabetic control often causes confusion for individuals seeking certification, as well as their employers. The following information provides answers to common questions and clears up misconceptions about diabetes and DOT certification. The maximum certification for a person with diabetes is one year. According to DOT guidelines, a person with diabetes, whether controlled with diet alone or diet plus medication, must meet the following criteria: Maintain a glycosylated hemoglobin (Hemoglobin A1C or “HBA1C”) of 8% or less. The HBA1C is a measure of the average amount of sugar in the blood over the last 3 months. A normal HBA1C is less than 5.7%. Values between 5.7 and 6.4% are classified as being in the pre-diabetic range. These individuals should be closely monitored. If the level is above 6.4%, then the person is diabetic. The HBA1C correlates very well with end organ (blood vessels, nerves, kidneys, heart, or eyes) damage and therefore is a popular marker for disease control. Red blood cells have a lifespan of about 90 days before they are removed by the spleen. Glucose sticks to the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Therefore, the glycosylated hemoglobin can be a good estimate of the average blood sugar and is Continue reading >>

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

Commercial Truck Driving And Diabetes: Can You Become Truck Driver With Diabetes

In this article we will explore what it takes to get a commercial driver’s license with diabetes, and how to get an insulin waiver for Type 1 and Type 2 persons who use insulin. We will look at requirements for Type 1 vs. Type 2 diabetes. We will look at insulin vs. non-insulin users. We will look at state vs. interstate CDL requirements. We will also look at the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) diabetes waiver program, and how you can be evaluated to drive a commercial vehicle across state lines when you have diabetes and use insulin. Intrastate guidelines for CDL with diabetes If you want to work in the trucking industry only within your state, and you do not plan to cross any state lines, you can get approved to drive a commercial vehicle in your state. For drivers driving within state lines, you do not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption. Likewise, you would not need to apply for the Federal Diabetes Exemption if you do not use insulin. Whatever rules and regulations your state has for holding a CDL with diabetes is what you have to follow for intrastate or interstate trucking. It is important to know that most commercial driving will be considered interstate, not intrastate driving, even if you do not cross state lines. If you are carrying cargo or passengers to or from another state, this is also considered as interstate commercial driving. For information on intrastate commercial driving, check with your home state for CDL requirements and see if they are applicable to you. They vary from state to state, with each state having its own regulations. You can look up the laws governing your state by visiting this page at the American Diabetes Association website, You can type your home state in the search for laws and requirements fo Continue reading >>

**must Read** Diabetes And The Dot Physical

**must Read** Diabetes And The Dot Physical

**MUST READ** Diabetes and the DOT physical I think what some of us are missing is that it takes more to treat diabetes than pills. It also takes LIFELONG proper diet and exercise. So even though we manage to get our physicals approved the companies have to fire us when we fail to demonstrate proper knowledge and control of our blood sugar. The federal DOT exemption is for proper lifelong management WITH INSULIN so typically it's not appropriate... I have had a tough road; I take jentadueto and metformin and have high blood pressure and cholesterol. Monitoring is expensive and the medications and doctors visits can be also... Trucking schools and companies "fool you" and "screw you" because they need to keep you "in the dark" to keep your health and physical STUDY accurate and also to keep you from running away from the job. This is a frustrating road... believe me I KNOW!!! Every month 400 people find a job with the help of TruckersReport. I take pills to control my sugar I've also lost weight so its not nearly as high, but I've never had a company check my sugar levels, as long as I pass my physical that's all that matters and as long as I only take pills and control my diabetes with diet and exersise I'm good I see my dr 2x a year, I take metformin, I get a 1 year card....... simple I'm curious, what is the highest A1C any of you have had and still passed a DOT physical. My last one was 8.3% and I'm guessing my next one will come in just under 8% with my physical due at end of August. well heres one for you....hubby was diagnosed back in 09 with diabetes.....was put on several types of meds last dec (2012) his sugar started dropping too low...so he stopped taking his meds... went again in april 5.5.....his new doctor (not the one who orig diagnosed him), told him sh Continue reading >>

New Optional Designation On Driver's Licenses And Non-driver Identification Cards For Insulin-dependent Diabetics

New Optional Designation On Driver's Licenses And Non-driver Identification Cards For Insulin-dependent Diabetics

New Jersey statute (N.J.S.A.) 39:3-10.8a allows a person who is an insulin- dependent diabetic to voluntarily inform the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC) of his/her diabetic status with the sole intent of having his/her MVC-issued driver's license or identification card (ID) and MVC record reflect that medical condition. Any person who wishes to have the insulin-dependent diabetic designation indicated on his/her driver's license or non-driver identification card and entered into the MVC database must follow the appropriate instructions. On the driver's license or identification card document there will be a "5" imprinted under "restriction." This will alert the law enforcement official or emergency medical personnel that there should also be a pink "designation/restriction" card on this person that will indicate the condition. Persons who wish to have this designation indicated on their driver's license or non-driver ID and entered into the MVC database must bring all of the following documentation to any motor vehicle agency. This cannot be done by mail. A statement on your doctor's prescription pad indicating that you have insulin-dependent diabetes. A completed "Request for Insulin-Dependent Designation" form (Form MR-20). Note: You will get this when you are at the agency. The applicable fee: If it is not time to renew your driver's license or non-driver ID, the fee will be $11.00 for a duplicate license. If it is time to renew your driver’s license or non-driver ID, the fee will be $24. The renewal fee is applicable for your type of license. We are required to capture a customer’s full face when taking a picture for a driver license or non-driver ID card; therefore we need to be able to see from the top of your forehead to the bottom of your chin. If Continue reading >>

More in diabetes